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At the beginning of this month, I went to Canada to meet a friend. We went to see Lake Ontario by bus, but my friend didn't plan the trip correctly. So we ended up walking for an hour or so in a residential area with no restaurant or commercial building in sight. Needless to say we were hungry and thirsty. My friend also needed to go. You can battle hunger and thirst, but it's very hard if you need to go. And because of this we couldn't even stop to take a breather. It was a nightmare.

We thought of knocking at someone's door and ask to use the toilet, but we weren't sure of the cultural norms. Pakistan is not one of the nicest countries in the world, but if you knock at someone's door and ask for help in a situation like this, most likely they'll let you in and help you. When I was in Pakistan, people would knock on the door and ask to use the toilet or ask for a glass of water, and we would let them in all the time.

Since MTF represents many counties and cultures of the world, I thought I'll open this to you guys; would you let a stranger in if they need to use a toilet or have another emergency? What are the cultural norms?
 

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You know funny you say this. I would have to say yes. Of course no one is obliged, but I'd say if you're in need and you ask politely, more often than not, you should get help. Perhaps the reason I'm more inclined is that when I was 8 years old, my mum took me to the doctors and our car wouldn't start on the way after having parked it in one street, so we got out and walked 10 minutes. At the time my mum didn't have a mobile phone, and she wanted to contact my dad to try and pick us up. It was getting very dark, so we knocked on a stranger's house and asked if we could use their phone. It was a Turkish family and they were very hospitable. They offered us some snacks and drinks while we waited. But they did even more than that. My mother couldn't remember where she had parked our car, so they drove us around in their car street by street till we located it (which may have taken 20 minutes - I remember the car being overflowed with passengers with my younger brother as well in tow) and even brought jumper leads to try and start it for us. They weren't successful but by the time we got there, my dad had arrived and we got home and the car was towed for service. Even though I was very young, I appreciated what that family did for us, not because we deserved any help or was entitled, but because they understood what we were going through and were glad to assist.

However, every person is different. In Australia, it's fairly relaxed but there's always preliminary anxiety about letting strangers in. 30 years ago, you could leave your doors unlocked in Australia without fuss. Today, you never know who will be the next crook to try and rob or assault you at times. But approach always with politeness and you should find some help. I'm also an ABC (Aussie born Chinese) so its quite common to have Asians help each other out. However that may not always extend to outward circles. I do find a lot of Anglo-Australians tend to be very friendly and accommodating, however.
My Christian faith also inclines me to 'love thy neighbour'. As it is taught that Jesus gave himself unconditionally for sinners, no task of mercy (within reason) is too hard towards others. However it's much harder than we think at times. Thanks for bringing up this topic.
 

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Living in London, the answer might probably be No, unless the stranger was incredibly hot, as well as needy. Hate to say it, but London is a magnet for every scammer in the entire World.

On the other hand, in specific circumstances, e.g. someone clearly in mortal danger after an injury of some kind, it could be necessary to go out on a limb.
 

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Depends of the context, in Colombia i think people are helpful and colaborative but with the insecurity problems and poverty, it's diffcult to allow a stranger to enter your house and use a bathroom. I mean, even if you go to a house and ask for that, they will probably call the police. I can give them a glass of water of course but without opening the fence.;)
 

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Depends, like another poster said. If they were badly wounded/dying, I'd let them in and call emergency services. But if they were "only" financially destitute/homeless, I'd be far more wary of letting them in. I'd probably refer them to a community housing/shelter organization, and let people who are more qualified and have the resources take care of the situation.

If someone needed to use the restroom, I...might let them in, but that's only because I currently live in suburbia. Depends on the person.
 

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If they were well presented, spoke well and gave me a good first impression then I would let them use my phone, maybe my toilet. I would not let them stay unless it was a very hot girl.

If it was a homeless person / ugly person I would slam the door in their face.
 

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At the beginning of this month, I went to Canada to meet a friend. We went to see Lake Ontario by bus, but my friend didn't plan the trip correctly. So we ended up walking for an hour or so in a residential area with no restaurant or commercial building in sight. Needless to say we were hungry and thirsty. My friend also needed to go. You can battle hunger and thirst, but it's very hard if you need to go. And because of this we couldn't even stop to take a breather. It was a nightmare.

We thought of knocking at someone's door and ask to use the toilet, but we weren't sure of the cultural norms. Pakistan is not one of the nicest countries in the world, but if you knock at someone's door and ask for help in a situation like this, most likely they'll let you in and help you. When I was in Pakistan, people would knock on the door and ask to use the toilet or ask for a glass of water, and we would let them in all the time.

Since MTF represents many counties and cultures of the world, I thought I'll open this to you guys; would you let a stranger in if they need to use a toilet or have another emergency? What are the cultural norms?
Couldn't your friend just shit in the nearby forrest or wherever you were
 

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At the beginning of this month, I went to Canada to meet a friend. We went to see Lake Ontario by bus, but my friend didn't plan the trip correctly. So we ended up walking for an hour or so in a residential area with no restaurant or commercial building in sight. Needless to say we were hungry and thirsty. My friend also needed to go. You can battle hunger and thirst, but it's very hard if you need to go. And because of this we couldn't even stop to take a breather. It was a nightmare.

We thought of knocking at someone's door and ask to use the toilet, but we weren't sure of the cultural norms. Pakistan is not one of the nicest countries in the world, but if you knock at someone's door and ask for help in a situation like this, most likely they'll let you in and help you. When I was in Pakistan, people would knock on the door and ask to use the toilet or ask for a glass of water, and we would let them in all the time.

Since MTF represents many counties and cultures of the world, I thought I'll open this to you guys; would you let a stranger in if they need to use a toilet or have another emergency? What are the cultural norms?
In your case. Yes.

But the issue heavily depends on general safety of the populace. City or village.
 

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unfortunately , with the way the world is today probably not. It would depend on the time of day for me. middle of the day or morning i would be more likely to but after 7:00 no chance
 

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unfortunately , with the way the world is today probably not. It would depend on the time of day for me. middle of the day or morning i would be more likely to but after 7:00 no chance
that's a good measure against vampires indeed.
 

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Hard to say. I suppose I'd really have to make this decision on the spot based on the appearance of the stranger, time of day, some other factors.

It's really, really hard trying to picture this scenario when you live in an apartment building. :lol: Like, why me? why did you come to my door of all the doors in the building? Also, there's a 24-hour donut shop and a 24-hour pharmacy a few blocks from my apartment, so no remote area here. :p
 

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Look, I am all for helping people. But no. A stranger I don't know, I am willing to help in any way ... feed them ... whatever. But my home is my sanctum
 

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Was more common years ago, before the age of mobile or cell phones.
Somebody had a broken down car and needed to ring for assistance etc, even had to do that myself once or twice.
Very rare somebody would do such a thing now, and would be apprehensive about allowing someone else in, even with myself and adult son in the house.
 
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