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Best of 5 set matches , where one match alone can last 4+ hours , times 7. Also you factor in the weather , the variety of opponents and the mental toughness needed to even hit that match winning shot or keep the ball in one more time, just so you can lift that one coveted trophy. Everything has to click in place for you to win the trophy....

For me, I think 2 is a pretty amazing number. It takes so much just to win that one grand slam and somehow you are able to make it all happen again.... probably on a different surface too.
Weather, varied opponents , stamina , tactics , scheduling , mental toughness , even some luck , all just so you can have a measly two slams and be looked at as a choking mug with no talent, who happened to fluke two slams.

That's not the truth though. Anyone who has one a Grand Slam , regardless of the the Era , the opponents , etc. is a F'ing legend!

15+ grand slams is just ridiculous , but one other thing I would like to look at is the CYGS

What Rod Laver did in 1962 still has to be one of the most historic moments in tennis history. For one whole 365 day period you were able to amass 4 trophies with all the conditions listed above. It's still impressive to win a Grand Slam and win one two years later... but getting all four at once makes me appreciate Rod Laver.

MTF might come through and destroy my post, but I just want us to think about all the legends who were able to pull off this feat regardless of the circumstances
 

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In the current Big 3 era, only 3 active players have won more than 3 grand slams, only 5 active players have won at least 3 grand slams, and only 7 active players have won a grand slam.

*** People often write off Rafa as a clay specialist, but, IMO, Rafa is the one that poses the most problems to players outside Big 3, due to him being lefty and a unique way of playing tennis. Murray and Cilic won USO'12 and USO'14 respectively, when Rafa withdrew from playing it during those years, and Wawrinka won USO'16, when Rafa was just coming back from the injury layoff after withdrawing from RG and Wimbledon in 2016.

Players like Nalbadian, Davydenko, Ferrer, and Berdych retired without winning a grand slam. Tsonga (Gasquet and Monfils) will retire without winning one. Winning one grand slam takes a humongous effort.
 
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The current era is the toughest IMO and its true winning even 2 slams is a massive achievement.

But didn't they play 3 slams on grass back in 60s an 70s? and AO was pretty much a non-existent slam since not many top players travelled?

Not trying to discredit Laver's achievement but I believe Novak's achievement was much more tougher to accomplish. Considering he played on 3 different surfaces and had to face 2 of his biggest rivals in the finals.
 

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The current era is the toughest IMO and its true winning even 2 slams is a massive achievement.

But didn't they play 3 slams on grass back in 60s an 70s? and AO was pretty much a non-existent slam since not many top players travelled?

Not trying to discredit Laver's achievement but I believe Novak's achievement was much more tougher to accomplish. Considering he played on 3 different surfaces and had to face 2 of his biggest rivals in the finals.
People often forget that about Laver. He is a legend yes, but I have to agree with you. What Djoker did was more impressive.
 

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Best of 5 set matches , where one match alone can last 4+ hours , times 7. ...

What Rod Laver did in 1962 still has to be one of the most historic moments in tennis history. For one whole 365 day period you were able to amass 4 trophies with all the conditions listed above. It's still impressive to win a Grand Slam and win one two years later... but getting all four at once makes me appreciate Rod Laver.
...
AO-USO is eight months period, though, and it was about six months on a few occasions when AO was held by the end of the season.

In 1962 AO was 48 players draw i.e. five rubbers for top players and six rubbers at RG'62.
In 1969 AO was again 48 players draw i.e. five rubbers for top players.

There was no TB, though, so e.g. the 2nd set of Laver/Roche AO'69 semifinal ended at 22-20 i.e. they have played more games in that set alone than M.Court in her first three matches that she would've quickly won 60 62 or in the similar fashion, similar to Wimb'10 when Isner&Mahut have played more games in their 70-68 5th set than winner Serena for the whole tournament.
 

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Best of 5 set matches , where one match alone can last 4+ hours , times 7. Also you factor in the weather , the variety of opponents and the mental toughness needed to even hit that match winning shot or keep the ball in one more time, just so you can lift that one coveted trophy. Everything has to click in place for you to win the trophy....

For me, I think 2 is a pretty amazing number. It takes so much just to win that one grand slam and somehow you are able to make it all happen again.... probably on a different surface too.
Weather, varied opponents , stamina , tactics , scheduling , mental toughness , even some luck , all just so you can have a measly two slams and be looked at as a choking mug with no talent, who happened to fluke two slams.

That's not the truth though. Anyone who has one a Grand Slam , regardless of the the Era , the opponents , etc. is a F'ing legend!

15+ grand slams is just ridiculous , but one other thing I would like to look at is the CYGS

What Rod Laver did in 1962 still has to be one of the most historic moments in tennis history. For one whole 365 day period you were able to amass 4 trophies with all the conditions listed above. It's still impressive to win a Grand Slam and win one two years later... but getting all four at once makes me appreciate Rod Laver.

MTF might come through and destroy my post, but I just want us to think about all the legends who were able to pull off this feat regardless of the circumstances
You were also talking about Djokovic with that bolded part, just in case you chose to somehow forget about his achievement ie. Nole Slam. And he did it in 3 different surfaces. Much tougher than Rod Laver.
 

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Well, 2 slams means pretty much Hall of Fame status. So obviously it's no joke winning 2 slams.
 

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Agreed, especially in this era. That's why players like Stan the Man and Sir Andy are and will always be great champions.
 

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There are ATGs that never won more than 2 slams in one year. Borg, Sampras, Agassi, Jmac, Becker, and many others. 2 slams per year are colossal achievement, no matter who you are
 

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You were also talking about Djokovic with that bolded part, just in case you chose to somehow forget about his achievement ie. Nole Slam. And he did it in 3 different surfaces. Much tougher than Rod Laver.
That's true. Nole did do that and that was quite the accomplishment, but for me it's not the same as a Calendar Year... even though on paper it techincally is.

If anyone did the Calendar Year Grandslam in the modern era it would be even more special, but this achievement has alluded Nadal, Djokovic and Federer a like.

Each guy has come real close, but no cigar.

If Novak had better mental strength/ fitness at RG he could have made it happen. But it just wasnt meant to be.

Yeah No hate on Novak, big achievement
 

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2 slams is a great career

I doubt any of tsitsipas, zverev or Medvedev will win more than 2-3. Kyrgios 1-2 at most but probably 0

Only guys of this gen I can see winning more than 2-3 are Theim and Felix.
 

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Laver played in an era where being able to hit a ball without hurting themselves already qualified as a tennis player. His achievements are overrated imo
 

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Best of 5 set matches , where one match alone can last 4+ hours , times 7. Also you factor in the weather , the variety of opponents and the mental toughness needed to even hit that match winning shot or keep the ball in one more time, just so you can lift that one coveted trophy. Everything has to click in place for you to win the trophy....

For me, I think 2 is a pretty amazing number. It takes so much just to win that one grand slam and somehow you are able to make it all happen again.... probably on a different surface too.
Weather, varied opponents , stamina , tactics , scheduling , mental toughness , even some luck , all just so you can have a measly two slams and be looked at as a choking mug with no talent, who happened to fluke two slams.

That's not the truth though. Anyone who has one a Grand Slam , regardless of the the Era , the opponents , etc. is a F'ing legend!

15+ grand slams is just ridiculous , but one other thing I would like to look at is the CYGS

What Rod Laver did in 1962 still has to be one of the most historic moments in tennis history. For one whole 365 day period you were able to amass 4 trophies with all the conditions listed above. It's still impressive to win a Grand Slam and win one two years later... but getting all four at once makes me appreciate Rod Laver.

MTF might come through and destroy my post, but I just want us to think about all the legends who were able to pull off this feat regardless of the circumstances
Your Laver comment was not precisely right.

His 1969 Open era Calender Grand Slam was far more impressive.

His 1962 run happened during a weaker competition of amateurs.

Djokovic won 4 Grand Slams in 365 days. You forgot to appreciate this achievement. No other player has done this on three different surfaces.
And he is the only player in the history of mens singles tennis to have won the NCYGS.
The CYGS has been achieved thrice in comparison (2x Laver, 1x Budge).
 
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Laver played in an era where being able to hit a ball without hurting themselves already qualified as a tennis player. His achievements are overrated imo
You have gone over the top, but it's true that Laver's achievements are a little overrated. Given access to today's equipment and training, Laver would still be a hell of player.
 
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