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Blown Out On the Trail
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OK, here are their interviews. Both guys are so likable and so funny. I feel like giving the biggest hug ever to DP. Pay attention in Nole's interview when DP asked Nole if he should challenge or not ... funny stuff :D
DP: "Should I challenge it"
Nole: "I'm not sure, it was close"
DP: "You just want me to waste my challenge" :lol:
Nole

DP
That was cute. Thanks for posting.
 

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Blown Out On the Trail
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This doesn't make much sense if you actually watched the match.
One can conclude only that he didn't watch the match. How can the person who rarely approached the net be the one who played better grass court tennis. Yet, the one who came to the net a great deal played clay court tennis. :scratch:

Sometimes I wonder if posters like this watch the match, and if they do watch the match do they understand what is happening, and if they do, are they just posting for effect. Is the idea just to promote an agenda or just to post nonsense to get people stirred up?
 

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One can conclude only that he didn't watch the match. How can the person who rarely approached the net be the one who played better grass court tennis. Yet, the one who came to the net a great deal played clay court tennis. :scratch:

Sometimes I wonder if posters like this watch the match, and if they do watch the match do they understand what is happening, and if they do, are they just posting for effect. Is the idea just to promote an agenda or just to post nonsense to get people stirred up?
None of what you said. No one goes to the net anymore. Definition of grass court tennis has changed with time. In this era grass court tennis means taking high risks from the baseline. Del Potro did the risk taking part for most of the match, clawed back from 0-40 situations with high risk tennis. Gymnast just retrieved everything and used a cheap trick at the end to get the break in the fifth(sarcastic appreciation). It is an ugly victory on grass.
 

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None of what you said. No one goes to the net anymore. Definition of grass court tennis has changed with time. In this era grass court tennis means taking high risks from the baseline. Del Potro did the risk taking part for most of the match, clawed back from 0-40 situations with high risk tennis. Gymnast just retrieved everything and used a cheap trick at the end to get the break in the fifth(sarcastic appreciation). It is an ugly victory on grass.
Now you're just making stuff up as you go along.

Nole's hit 80 winners, came to the net... The definition of grass court tennis didn't change; you changed it to suit your embarrassing argument.
 

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Now you're just making stuff up as you go along.

Nole's hit 80 winners, came to the net... The definition of grass court tennis didn't change; you changed it to suit your embarrassing argument.
How many times did he serve and volley or go to the net to force the issue?
 

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http://www.wimbledon.com/en_GB/news/articles/2013-07-06/201307061373118758903.html
This is confusing. Anyone who'd rather watch the second SF rather than the first is a little strange to me, but I guess that's patriotism.

How many times did he serve and volley or go to the net to force the issue?
Here you go: http://www.wimbledon.com/en_GB/scores/stats/day19/1601ms.html
Click on rally stats for a breakdown of the winners. They're pretty similar with groundstroke winners.
 

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How many times did he serve and volley or go to the net to force the issue?
Djokovic 42/56 (75%) net points won.

Del potro 25/37 (68%) net points won.

Djokovic had more winners, approached the net more, played better (slightly) and won. He played good grass court tennis, they both did. You have zero argument.

You clearly didn't even watch the match. Either that, or you're just trolling.
 

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How many times did he serve and volley or go to the net to force the issue?
look at the stats and see for yourself who played attacking tennis:

 

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look at the stats and see for yourself who played attacking tennis:

None of them played attacking tennis.

56 netpoints out of 368 points overall doesn't mean he played attacking tennis. Djokovic went to the net, because he served well yesterday and Delpo is not the best returner on Tour. Whenever he couldn't get a clear advantage with his serve, he just grinded it out. Not much to do with attacking tennis.

Delpo grinded a lot too, which is a clear indicator that it wasn't his best match (good and promising, but far from his best), as he should make proper use of his powerful groundstrokes and serve.
 

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Djokovic 42/56 (75%) net points won.

Del potro 25/37 (68%) net points won.

Djokovic had more winners, approached the net more, played better (slightly) and won. He played good grass court tennis, they both did. You have zero argument.

You clearly didn't even watch the match. Either that, or you're just trolling.
Murray went to the net 36 times in his semis to track down Janowicz's drop shots. So Djokovic's 42/56 does not mean he hit 42 edberg volleys at the net. Come to me with points on which he took the initiative and forced the issue. Get me the highlights of his high risk tennis a la Del Potro on some of the break points.
 

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None of them played attacking tennis.

56 netpoints out of 368 points overall doesn't mean he played attacking tennis. Djokovic went to the net, because he served well yesterday and Delpo is not the best returner on Tour. Whenever he couldn't get a clear advantage with his serve, he just grinded it out. Not much to do with attacking tennis.

Delpo grinded a lot too, which is a clear indicator that it wasn't his best match (good and promising, but far from his best), as he should make proper use of his powerful groundstrokes and serve.
You sure you watched the match? This was the match of the year, an instant classic. The standard was amazing in all 5 sets, there were no let downs as there often is in a 5-set match, the quality was immense throughout and each of the 5 sets could have gone either way (bar perhaps the first where JMDP didn't have any BPs). Djokovic hit 22 aces and 80 winners, he was not grinding at all, don't remember any other match where he got so many winners - also most of his errors came off daring attempts to change direction off delPo's missiles; there were long rallies but both guys were hitting with attacking intent, there was no pushing at all.

On grass, this was definitely del Potro's best match to date. Don't know what you're on about saying he didn't make proper use of his powerful groundstrokes, he was murdering the ball for the most part. He had a bit of an off day on serve (still pretty decent though, and let's not forget facing Djokovic's return puts a lot more pressure on your serve than Seppi and co.), but off the ground he had never played better on grass. He pushed the best player in the world to his very limits, I'd say that's pretty good and encouraging.
 

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You sure you watched the match? This was the match of the year, an instant classic. The standard was amazing in all 5 sets, there were no let downs as there often is in a 5-set match, the quality was immense throughout and each of the 5 sets could have gone either way (bar perhaps the first where JMDP didn't have any BPs). Djokovic hit 22 aces and 80 winners, he was not grinding at all, don't remember any other match where he got so many winners - also most of his errors came off daring attempts to change direction off delPo's missiles; there were long rallies but both guys were hitting with attacking intent, there was no pushing at all.

On grass, this was definitely del Potro's best match to date. Don't know what you're on about saying he didn't make proper use of his powerful groundstrokes, he was murdering the ball for the most part. He had a bit of an off day on serve (still pretty decent though, and let's not forget facing Djokovic's return puts a lot more pressure on your serve than Seppi and co.), but off the ground he had never played better on grass. He pushed the best player in the world to his very limits, I'd say that's pretty good and encouraging.
There were a lot of long rallies and situations when both players just pushed the ball to the middle. He ballbashed once in a while, but definitely too rare for such a great ballbasher he is. No wonder it was the longest semi at Wimbledon, ever. At some later point of the match they even showed an interesting stat: his average FH speed was lower than Nole's!
 

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There were a lot of long rallies and situations when both players just pushed the ball to the middle. He ballbashed once in a while, but definitely too rare for such a great ballbasher he is. No wonder it was the longest semi at Wimbledon, ever. At some later point of the match they even showed an interesting stat: his average FH speed was lower than Nole's!
There were long rallies, but not pushing rallies at all. And del Potro is not a ballbasher, he's a power baseliner, he never was and never will be the sort of players that tries to end the point as soon as possible, but rather get his opponent out of position and create a chance to unleash his forehand. He uses his power in a constructive way. If you want to see someone swinging wildly from impossible positions, better look elsewhere.

It was the longest semi at Wimbledon because it took almost 400 points to decide and both players were producing amazing shots from every part of the court, even from defensive positions.

I think Novak described this match in a very apt manner:

I've had some epic matches in my career and some long five‑setters. Especially the one that stands out is the finals Nadal Australian Open a few years ago. It went for six hours.

But I have the experience of playing a long matches, and I know that I have been pushed to the limit today, as my opponent was also. It was one of the most thrilling matches that I have ever played, especially here in Wimbledon.

It was a very high‑quality tennis from the first to the last point. There's not many unforced errors. I think there was a lot of, lot of winners. So both of us, we tried to dictate the play. I did have opportunities in the fourth set when I was a break up and match points in tiebreaker to end out the match earlier.

But credit to him, because he show his fighting spirit. He came up with from back of the court some amazing flat backhands and forehands that you cannot say anything but congratulate him on that and move on.

But I managed to hang in there, stay tough, and really glad to win.
Two of the best players in the game pushing each other to the limit in a match where winners dominated and incredible shots in clutch situations, doesn't get much better than this in this baseline-oriented era.
 

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There were a lot of long rallies and situations when both players just pushed the ball to the middle. He ballbashed once in a while, but definitely too rare for such a great ballbasher he is. No wonder it was the longest semi at Wimbledon, ever. At some later point of the match they even showed an interesting stat: his average FH speed was lower than Nole's!
IMO the last place you should look is rallies. Just look at the points won on second serve, which is the cause for many longer rallies. He won a majority on his and a bigger majority on Nole's. Whatever he was doing with the rallies, it was the right thing, and not where the problem lies.
 

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Murray went to the net 36 times in his semis to track down Janowicz's drop shots. So Djokovic's 42/56 does not mean he hit 42 edberg volleys at the net. Come to me with points on which he took the initiative and forced the issue. Get me the highlights of his high risk tennis a la Del Potro on some of the break points.
You seem to have this ridiculous idea that attacking tennis is about 'high risk'...what you refer to 'high risk' many would call ball-bashing. In fact, attacking tennis is not about taking 'high risks'. Sometimes, sure, you have to paint the lines and take your chances, but attacking tennis is simply about taking initiative, it has nothing to do with 'high risk'. Nole, for example, plays many backhands/forehands with great initiative/power, moving his opponent from side to side, but his margin for error is quite high - for him those are not high risk shots. For others, mainly ball-bashers, they might be high risk, but not for players like Nole, Federer, Murray, Nadal etc.
 

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There were long rallies, but not pushing rallies at all. And del Potro is not a ballbasher, he's a power baseliner, he never was and never will be the sort of players that tries to end the point as soon as possible, but rather get his opponent out of position and create a chance to unleash his forehand. He uses his power in a constructive way. If you want to see someone swinging wildly from impossible positions, better look elsewhere.

It was the longest semi at Wimbledon because it took almost 400 points to decide and both players were producing amazing shots from every part of the court, even from defensive positions.

I think Novak described this match in a very apt manner:



Two of the best players in the game pushing each other to the limit in a match where winners dominated and incredible shots in clutch situations, doesn't get much better than this in this baseline-oriented era.
Don't get me wrong, Delpo played a really good match and I said it was promising before US Open. I just can't agree with "his greatest match" and "lots of powerful hitting" texts, as they are not true in case of this match.

Delpo can hit a FH as powerful as nobody and he did try to dictate points more often at USO 2009. At IW or here he was much more defensive, by which I don't mean "taking opponent out of position", but rather pushing the ball.

When Nole's average groungstrokes are faster than Delpo's, you know JMDP is not playing too offensive.

I don't think 368 points was the most in Wimbly semi history. It was the length of rallies that made it the longest.

As for the interview, we all know Novak is very cordial in them.
 

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look at the stats and see for yourself who played attacking tennis:

Net points doesnt mean serve and volleying. it includes net approaches.
 

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IMO the last place you should look is rallies. Just look at the points won on second serve, which is the cause for many longer rallies. He won a majority on his and a bigger majority on Nole's. Whatever he was doing with the rallies, it was the right thing, and not where the problem lies.
Maybe you're right that his defensive skills mixed with ballbashing from time to time did a good job after Nole's 2nd serves, but IMO at least at his service games he should have been more aggressive. The same for those rare occasions of 1st serves, that managed to return deep.

That's why I agree, that it's an optimistic performance before USO, which gives him chances to compete for the title there, but at the same time he should find more power. Especially at his serve, but also groundstrokes.
 

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Don't get me wrong, Delpo played a really good match and I said it was promising before US Open. I just can't agree with "his greatest match" and "lots of powerful hitting" texts, as they are not true in case of this match.

Delpo can hit a FH as powerful as nobody and he did try to dictate points more often at USO 2009. At IW or here he was much more defensive, by which I don't mean "taking opponent out of position", but rather pushing the ball.

When Nole's average groungstrokes are faster than Delpo's, you know JMDP is not playing too offensive.

I don't think 368 points was the most in Wimbly semi history. It was the length of rallies that made it the longest.

As for the interview, we all know Novak is very cordial in them.
del Potro is a player of the Djokovic/Murray generation, he's a baseliner - only relying on power/depth/consistency instead of defense/movement... he was never and will never be a ballbasher. It's about time people stop being surprised when he gets often engaged in long rallies; it's not an anomaly, it's his game and has always been: hitting powerful shots to get his opponent off position/draw a short ball and then unleash his forehand. He never ever beat the top players (bar Nadal) by just blowing them off the court, but by outrallying them, by his ability to hit a lot of powerful deep shots in rallies, relentlessly. There's a difference between dictating points and blasting the ball for winners at the first chance, del Potro definitely did try to dictate rallies as often as possible.

Where did you get those groundstroke stats from? That said, although I doubt Novak was hitting harder, it'd not be that surprising, since he can produce much better shots from defensive positions than del Potro, which obviously influences the average. del Potro pushing the ball is an hilarious concept, with his movement he'd be routined by any top 20 player without his power/depth/weight of shot keeping opponents at bay.

It wasn't just Novak, the match has been hailed as a classic already by many, even MTF has more or less collectively agreed on it and you know how negative MTF usually is.
 
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