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I think it would be nice if there are more colors than just one. For example, orange, pink, light green, sky blue, or rainbow color would come in nice combinations. It can be a small touch which this traditional sport traditionally lacks. :smile2:
 

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Why aren’t tennis balls white, like baseballs or golf balls? Or, more accurately, why aren’t they white*anymore?

That’s right: tennis balls used to be white. As recently as the mid-1980s, for example, when top pros took to England to participate in the annual Wimbledon tournament, they weren’t hitting yellow balls of fuzz. As seen in the photo below (via ESPN) of John McEnroe — it’s pretty clear that they’re using a white ball.

So, what changed? Television.

Televisions became commercially viable in the 1920s and became commonplace over the next decade. In 1937, with much fanfare, the BBC aired a tennis match at Wimbledon for the first time. But it didn’t look like the photo above. For the first thirty years of Wimbledon on television, it was broadcast in black and white, as for most of that time period, the color TV hadn’t yet been invented, and certainly wasn’t something you found in most households.

In the 1960s, that changed. Color TVs were increasingly popular, and the sports world had to react. In 1967,*the BBC broadcast the tournament like it always did, but this time did so in color. Many other tournaments had already made the switch and many others would follow. By the early 1970s, if you were watching tennis on your TV, you no longer were doing so in black and white.

But the experience wasn’t great for fans watching at home. The culprit? The white ball. As Tennis Week*notes, “research showed that TV viewers had a tougher time seeing the ball in motion on the courts.” Further, as an ESPN television producer*told a reporter, the balls “always turned green from grass stains [at Wimbledon, at least; not all courts are grass courts]. They blended so much with the grass the visuals were compromised.”

In the 1970s, the International Tennis Federation responded by looking for a non-white option for tournaments. After much research, the ITF decided on a color which would appear well on television and landed on something called* “optic yellow” or sometimes, yes, fluorescent lime green. Regardless, it was easier for those watching at home to follow along. In 1972, the ITF first authorized the yellow tennis balls we use today for competitive*use.

In 1986, Wimbledon — the final holdout of tennis’s four major tournaments — gave in to the needs of technology and adopted the optic yellow ball. Since then, players of all levels and abilities have done the same, even though few of us will ever play tennis on television. And today, we take for granted that tennis balls are yellow (or green, fine).
Why Tennis Balls Are Yellow | Now I Know
 

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It's a very good question. Rather than messing with a successful point system, the nextgen finals could have been played with a different coloured ball. It makes sense that the colour of the ball should not be similar to that of the court so we could have 3 possibly 4 different coloured balls throughout the slams.

I personally think rather this is a great idea. I like subtle changes to make the sport interesting and this is a subtle change. Cricket has done it with a pink ball at night and it's proven to be quite successful.
 

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How about lights out, glow-in-the-dark tennis balls, racquets, lines and net?

Sent from my LGL84VL using Tapatalk
LOL, and players wearing fluorescent kits and facepaint?
 

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I think the yellow balls seem bigger than white balls or any less optic colour even for the players on court so they help the players to play more consistently avoiding shanks and playing with sweet spot more often.
 

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When I first started playing tennis, the ball were white. Yellow balls were a huge improvement.

And no--I'm not 100 years old.

Yellow is the easiest colour to see, and it stands out best against blue--they are "complementary" colours. This is why most hardcourts are blue, and balls are yellow. This is also why they tried blue clay in Madrid, to help see the ball.

Any other colour of ball would be inferior.
 

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I’ve wondered this myself. I particularly don’t understand why Madrid went so far as to change to blue clay in 2012 for better TV viewing instead of just changing to a different-colored ball that would stand out against normal clay.
 

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I buy nothing else than bright orange balls (Penn). When I was a beginner, my partners and I could be very off too often and since there was no net between the courts, it meant that those balls invaded our neighbors, getting mixed with their balls. It was extremely annoying to have to check each ball to find out which one were ours, so I started buying orange balls - problem solved. Even if we would hit very off, everyone knew instantly they were ours even two or three courts away and it was so much more convenient for everyone. One of my partners even started buying the same Penn balls, but in fluo pink.

Now I have a ball machine and again, very convenient when you bring 85-90 balls, even though where I use it, there is a net in between the courts (I can't imagine using a ball machine without a net unless there really was nobody else). It definitely wouldn't be fun to try to account for every ball otherwise, because the net doesn't completely prevent balls from crossing to another court. But even before I got the ball machine, with a much improved accuracy from the beginning, I never went back to yellow. There is a group of people sometimes who are also using some orange balls at the same time than I do and I find that annoying.

I must admit that perhaps the yellow ball is slightly more visible than orange, perhaps a little more while playing in the dark, but it's not like it's an issue in any way for me. The difference is extremely small, basically negligible. Of course, no one among us is trying to return Raonic's serves either. :biggrin:
 

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I have deuteranopia which makes it increasingly difficult for me to see and distinguish different colours that others can easily tell the difference. I can barely watch clay court tennis without really experimenting with my TV set, with colour settings, contrast settings and brightness settings. Then when the sun is extra shiny I have to then play about with it again, switching courts, I have to do it again.

Hard Courts, yellow on blue and green, is fine. Grass courts seems to be fine which surprises most people.

So when others say it would add nothing to the sport of tennis, that may be true for the players but for others with colour blindness it would certainly make it more inclusive. If I was going to choose a colour of ball I would go for black, easy to see on all courts and wouldn't interfere with lines peoples calls.
 

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I think it would be nice if there are more colors than just one. For example, orange, pink, light green, sky blue, or rainbow color would come in nice combinations.
I think French Open should change those every year until Nadal retires, with a slogan:

"We may not be able to change the outcome, but we can totally change the ball colors."
 

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I think the yellow balls seem bigger than white balls or any less optic colour even for the players on court so they help the players to play more consistently avoiding shanks and playing with sweet spot more often.
Well, guitarra 'the MTF clown' has spoken. That must be IT. Sheesh.

Another stupid thread but whatever. Why oh why ... Life is so strange.
 
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