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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
You know what I am talkin about..
I believe there are players who but usually I notice the players that give the point away is when they are in the winning position like 2 sets up or maybe a game away from the match (e.g 5-1) or in a exhibition match so might as well feel 'generous' giving the point away when the umpire or linesman made the wrong call. I always think those players just feel like they are in a mood to give away or they want a bonus applause from the spectator/commentator like "wow, that was a nice gesture" but to me, it doesn't make a difference because they are 'likely' to win the match anyways or otherwise I feel.....do it in critical time, now that is what I call the legitimate sportsmanship

One example is the 2015 Aussie Open Nadal facing Smyczek, a spectator yelled out loudly during Nadal's ball toss which distracted him and served a fault.
In this scenario, Nadal was serving for the match in the 5th set 30/0. It could have been a second serve. Instead, Smyczek gave him the opportunity to serve again. I was quite shocked when he did that honestly and I am sure no one expected that. This is a classic example where during these type of tense situation I bet other players would keep quiet and take advantage (and thank the crowd inside their heart as it gives them a little chance of coming back). Imagine if it was Jerzy Janowicz, Zverev, Tomic, F'a'ginni etc, you can ensure there is absolutely no way they would give Nadal a chance as those peers have also a lot of ego issues.
 

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The famous one:

Honesty backfires as Roddick loses

Thursday, May 5, 2005 Posted: 2059 GMT (0459 HKT)

ROME, Italy -- A fair-play gesture backfired for Andy Roddick as Fernando Verdasco came back from the brink of defeat to oust the top seed 6-7 7-6 6-4 in the third round of the Rome Masters.
One set down and serving at 3-5 and 0-40 in the second, a linesman called Verdasco's second serve out and the umpire announced Roddick the winner.
Roddick, however, corrected the call, telling the umpire the ball was in.
Verdasco went on to hold serve and then break his distracted-looking opponent in the following game.
The set went to a tiebreak, which the Spaniard won easily by whipping crosscourt winners off both wings.
Roddick then put a forehand wide to drop serve in the opening game of the decider and the unseeded Verdasco, now playing with increasing confidence, went on to claim victory.
 

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True, but (as someone pointed out recently) all it did was save the umpire from checking the mark - the serve was in and the mark was visible...
Additionally, Roddick had good reason to think he had the match fully under control and was about to win. The Smyczek example is more powerful as they were in a fifth set and the match was tight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Rafter reversed a call on himself against Cherkasov in Adelaide and it cost him the match.


Interesting, never knew that
I surely knew he was a nice bloke and fair man but didn't know he was 'that' good willing to almost give away the match in that SUPER tense point as it was either do or die situation. One interesting to note that no player has done that his when he won his 1st US grand slam title , he gave 1/2 of the prize money to Starlight Children’s Foundation. Even his countryman Rusty or Federer has not done it so nor I think we will ever have a player that will do that
Even Federer won the Sportsmanship Award many times, I think it's very hard to topple Rafter in that category....

Looks like now we have Rafter The Man...

Furthermore more, I just found another article understanding his deeper personality

 

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17 years old, mp for a final slam, no more words.

Yes, that one is hard to beat. It also should be considered that this was WIlanders first appearance in the later stages of a big tournament, and that he had already wasted a match point when leading 7-5 6-2 1-6 5-1. Clerc came back to 5-5 in that fourth set and had the momentum on his side. After these ups and downs it was very well possible that Wilander could still lose the match. I don't think there are many players who would have told the arbiter to replay in this situation.
 
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