Mens Tennis Forums banner

141 - 152 of 152 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
312 Posts
Yeah Frank :D Finally a good result again :yeah:

Win this now :bounce:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27 Posts
^ ha ha...........Go Frank!!!.......win one for the Christians! :angel: lol

Good to see Frank back in the game.....I really hope he can pull through this one and win a title to get back on track.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,866 Posts
:woohoo:

(and way to make the final Frank, coming back from some time off and all :D )
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
312 Posts
Frank probably lead 7-5 and 5-something :rolleyes:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
17,866 Posts
BUD COLLINS
Major chances in minors
By Bud Collins, Globe Correspondent | November 5, 2005

SUDBURY -- There were no cockroaches in the locker room and, for that, Justin Gimelstob was grateful. He has showered in such places. ''Fergara in Uzbekistan -- you know, central Asia -- was the worst, I guess, in my travels, but there have been some pretty bad ones.

''But this is one of the best."

The surroundings and cushy atmosphere of the new tennis club on Route 20, Bosse Sports, may have taken some of the sting out of Gimelstob's tight loss to young Canadian Frank Dancevic Thursday night. Still, he would have gladly suffered a cockroach convention for a win.

''I need the computer points to make sure I can get into the Australian Open in January without going through qualifying."

After wandering the planet for a decade, Gimelstob, a 28-year-old pro out of Livingston, N.J., had a new address for a few days -- Sudbury, MA 01776. And Sudbury became a new destination on the unending global tennis cavalcade in the form of the $75,000 USTA/ADTECH Challenger, a weeklong tournament for guys that concludes with semifinals today at 1 (Dancevic and Paraguayan Ramon Delgado, respectively, against Americans Paul Goldstein and Kevin Kimand) and the final tomorrow.

''It's the minors, but a chance to move up to the big league or, for me, to get back there."

A lanky, 6-foot-3-inch All-American at UCLA, where his grade-point average was 4.0 for the two years he stayed, Gimelstob has been a high-low commuter. Five months ago, it was nirvana as he fought a good, but losing, battle with 2002 champ Lleyton Hewitt on Wimbledon's Centre Court. The world was watching.

Two nights ago, maybe 100 folks sat in on his 7-5, 6-3 defeat by No. 194 Dancevic. Centre Court to Sudbury -- part of the journey. Exotic Sudbury. Not exactly Bangkok, where Gimelstob very nearly beat Hewitt in September, and was momentarily big in Thailand. Gimelstob collected $860 for his brief role here, but in fluctuating between the bigs and littles this year has won $200,000. ''Look, I've got two brothers, investment bankers working 15 hours a day in an office. They make more than me, but I'm having more fun."

D.J. Bosse, 38, may be rescuing professional tournament tennis in the area.

''We're all for him and the title sponsor, ADTECH," said Tim Curry of the US Tennis Association. The USTA puts more than $5 million in organizing and helping the minor league in this country, a network of more than 70 internationally open tournaments. ''This is where most Americans get their start."

Or finish. Or keep hanging in like Gimelstob, once as high as No. 63, but now at No. 97, hoping to climb into the 80s and right into the Australian. It's the same goal that lured Delgado, Brazilian Andre Sa, Pole Adam Chadaj, Czech Jiri Vanek, Croat Roko Karanusic, and Aussie Chris Guccione to Sudbury, along with Americans Bobby Reynolds, Goldstein, Scoville Jenkins, Kevin Kim, and Jeff Morrison.

Bosse laughingly describes his role as ''feeding the starving. I know the Boston area has a lot of hungry tennis fans who've felt left out since Longwood folded the US Pro in 1999. This is historically tennis country, and this is the start to restore a local tournament. We welcome the return of the Boston Lobsters and World TeamTennis. The more tennis the better. But the tournament format shouldn't be lost.

''I think we can bring in the best players as we offer more money and redevelop the pro game in Boston."

Bosse has formed the first full-time teaching academy in this area, staffed by 11 pros. His Bosse Foundation is underwriting three promising teenagers from overseas: Rupesh Roy, 16, from India, and South Africans Ruan Roelofse, 15, and James Monroe, 14.

Roy, a shy yet friendly kid, uneasy with the transition from Hindi to English, flashes eager brown eyes. Sudbury isn't Calcutta, and lacks an Indian restaurant. The youngest of seven children of a struggling farm worker, Rupesh played barefoot on dried cow dung courts. But he was spotted as a talent, sent to Bosse, and even won a doubles match here Tuesday with Tom Blake.

Sudbury, now on the worldwide map of tennis, might be the start for Rupesh, too.

http://www.boston.com/sports/other_sports/tennis/articles/2005/11/05/major_chances_in_minors/
 

·
Pacific Northwest Home
Joined
·
31,842 Posts
Thanks Fee that was great! Roy is only 15? Wow he looks older than that. Very shy. And I used to park cars at the Longwood Tennis and Cricket Club from the years 73-77. Arrghghgh...
 
141 - 152 of 152 Posts
Top