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Discussion Starter #101
It's a shame W cancelled their event, since it looks like the USO and FO will be held, W should've just held it without any fans!! Tennis should've resumed around June 8th, ah well...
 

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^ Federer made the Roland Garros SF last year, so if he plays he'll probably reach the SF.
His draw was very easy. Ruud was his most complicated challenge prior to the QF. He is not a threat to the top contenders. He would also get destroyed without the crowd support.

He has a terrible 2-5 H2H record against Thiem. Against Nadal, he cannot win on clay, period. And good luck to him having any shot in a Bo5 against Djokovic. He likely would also lose to Tsitsipas, Zverev, etc. All things considered (including the lack of crowd support), I would say Federer would not be among the top 10 favourites at Roland Garros.
 

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How about the USO, how do you fancy Rogie's chances there in 2020??
It would be 12 years since he won his last US Open. I think the window has closed. It is also not like he had been losing to the best. He had terrible losses in the last few years here (Del Potro, Millman, Dimitrov). Factor in the knee surgery and the lack of crowd support, and it will be even more difficult, if not impossible.
 

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Discussion Starter #105
I don't see it that way, Rogie will be healthy this time, not tired, hot, or injured, and he'll do some serious damage there... I still wish W was being played!!
 

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US Open plan in works, including group flights, COVID-19 tests
6:19 PM ET



Charter flights to ferry US Open tennis players and limited entourages from Europe, South America and the Middle East to New York. Negative COVID-19 tests before traveling. Centralized housing. Daily temperature checks.

No spectators. Fewer on-court officials. No locker-room access on practice days.
All are among the scenarios being considered for the 2020 US Open -- if it is held at all amid the coronavirus pandemic -- and described to The Associated Press by a high-ranking official at the Grand Slam tournament.
"All of this is still fluid," Stacey Allaster, the U.S. Tennis Association's chief executive for professional tennis, said in a telephone interview Saturday. "We have made no decisions at all."

With that caveat, Allaster added that if the USTA board does decide to go forward with the Open, she expects it to be held at its usual site and in its usual spot on the calendar. The main draw is scheduled to start Aug. 31.
"We continue to be, I would say, 150% focused on staging a safe environment for conducting a US Open at the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center in New York on our dates. It's all I wake up -- our team wakes up -- thinking about," Allaster said. "The idea of an alternative venue, an alternative date ... we've got a responsibility to explore it, but it doesn't have a lot of momentum."
An announcement should come from "mid-June to end of June," Allaster said.
All sanctioned competition has been suspended by the ATP, WTA and International Tennis Federation since March and is on hold until late July.
The French Open was postponed from May to September; Wimbledon was canceled for the first time since 1945.
There is no established COVID-19 protocol for tennis, a global sport with several governing bodies.
"Everybody would agree to the fundamental principles, I'm sure: protecting the health of participants, following the local laws and minimizing the risk of the transmission of the virus," said Stuart Miller, who is overseeing the ITF's return-to-tennis policy. "But then you have to get down into the specific details."
One such detail: The USTA wants to add locker rooms -- including at indoor courts that housed hundreds of temporary hospital beds at the height of New York's coronavirus outbreak -- and improve air filtration in existing spaces. Also being considered: no locker-room access until just before a match. So if anyone goes to Flushing Meadows just to train, Allaster said, "you come, you practice and return to the hotel."
The USTA presented its operational plan to a medical advisory group Friday; now that will be discussed with city, state and federal government officials.
"The fundamental goal here is to mitigate risk," Allaster said.
If the Billie Jean King National Tennis Center hosts the US Open this year, it might be doing so without fans in attendance. The main draw is scheduled to begin play on Aug. 31.
Governors around the country, such as New York's Andrew Cuomo, who are open to allowing professional sports to resume say that should be without fans.
"We are spending a lot of time and energy on all the models, including no fans on site," Allaster said. "The government will help guide us."
In 2019, about 850,000 people attended the US Open site from the week before the main draw through the finals.
Lew Sherr, the USTA's chief revenue officer, told the AP it is "less and less likely" spectators would be at the US Open this year.
That, Sherr said, means "forgoing ticketing revenue, forgoing hospitality revenue, forgoing a portion of your sponsorship revenue." But TV and digital-rights fees, plus remaining sponsorship dollars, are "significant enough that it's still worth it to go forward with a no-fans-on-site US Open," he said.
Other areas Allaster addressed:
SCORING:
Having best-of-three-set matches in men's singles "has hardly been discussed," she said. "If the players came to us and said, 'That is something we want to do,' we would consider it. But we will not make a unilateral decision on that without player input."
TESTING:
Before traveling to New York, players would need proof of a negative COVID-19 test. "Once they come into our, let's say, 'US Open world,'" Allaster said, "there will be a combination of daily health questionnaires, daily temperature checks and ... some nasal or saliva or antibody testing."
CHARTERS:

Paris, Vienna, Frankfurt, Buenos Aires and Dubai are among the cities where players could catch a flight to John F. Kennedy International Airport on an airline that is a tournament partner. Afterward, players might be taken to where they play next; tournament sites in late September could include Paris, Madrid or Rome.
ENTOURAGES:
"A player coming with an entourage of five, six, seven, eight is not something that's in the plan," Allaster said. One possibility: Tournaments could provide physiotherapists and masseuses so players don't bring their own.
OFFICIATING:
Matches could use fewer line judges than usual, with more reliance on line-calling technology. "It's a hard one," Allaster said. "Obviously, we want to ensure that we have the highest level of integrity."
BALL PERSONS:
The current plan is to have them -- only adults, no kids.
 

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SCORING:
Having best-of-three-set matches in men's singles "has hardly been discussed," she said. "If the players came to us and said, 'That is something we want to do,' we would consider it. But we will not make a unilateral decision on that without player input."
So this shit begins....
 

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"best-of-three-set matches in men's singles "

In the 70s, there were bo3 set at the Australian, French and US Open until the 4th round a few editions, but not at Wimbledon
 

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Does seem from all these warm up events starting to pop up in July there is reasonable confidence there may be some sort of regular schedule from August/September perhaps?
 

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Rafael Nadal not sure US Open can be played in 2020
7:59 AM ET
  • Associated Press
If it weren't for a coronavirus pandemic-caused postponement, the French Open would have been in Week 2 now, and Rafael Nadal might still have been in contention for a 20th Grand Slam title.

Instead, he's home in Spain, practicing lightly -- and wondering along with everyone else in tennis whether the next Grand Slam tournament, the US Open, will be held.

"If you [ask] me today, I will say, 'No,''' Nadal said with a shake of his head during a video conference call with The Associated Press and other wire services Thursday
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"In a couple of months? I don't know. Hopefully, 'Yes,''' he continued. "But we need to wait probably until we have more clear information about how the virus evolves and how the situation is going to be in New York in a couple of months. Because, of course, New York has been one of the places that have been very strongly hit by the virus. So let's see.''
Nadal thinks there are two key requirements for the U.S. Open to happen -- and for tennis to resume anywhere: assurances about being protected from the coronavirus and having everyone be able to fly internationally.
"We can't come back until the situation is completely safe enough in terms of [health],'' he said, ''and fair enough in terms of all the players from every single [country] can travel to the tournaments under safe circumstances to compete.''

Tennis, like most sports, has been on hold since March because of the COVID-19 outbreak.

The ATP and WTA tours are suspended at least until late July. The French Open's start was pushed back from May until September. Wimbledon was canceled for the first time in 75 years.

A decision about the US Open is expected within weeks; the tournament's main draw is scheduled to begin in New York on Aug. 31.
The U.S. Tennis Association's chief executive for pro tennis, Stacey Allaster, told the AP on Saturday that contingency plans include providing charter flights from around the world for players and requiring proof of negative virus tests before travel.

"I really believe we need to be patient, be responsible,'' Nadal said, ''and we need to [be] calm and do the things the right way.''

Nadal, who turned 34 on Wednesday, said he didn't touch a racket for more than two months before recently resuming training in a less-intense way than normal and ''not testing my body.''

"I am going very slow, step by step, not playing every single day and not practicing much,'' he said.

Usually at this time of year, he is exerting himself on the red clay of Roland Garros, where he has won a record 12 of his 19 major championships.

He's neither optimistic nor pessimistic right now about whether the French Open can be played later in 2020.

"I miss playing tennis. I miss playing the tournament that I love the most,'' Nadal said. ''But at the same time, my mind is not thinking about that. My mind is focused on trying to recover the normal life. The first thing we have to do is recover the normal.''
 
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