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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone else noticed that there seem to be a lot of medical timeouts in grand slam finals due to "groin" injuries that allow players to leave the court and disrupt the rythm of their opponent. I wouldn't mind the players using the timeouts if they are truly injured, but it seems as though they always seem to take it when the other player happens to break their serve or get "hot". I've seen both Djokovic and Federer use this tactic several times especially in grand slam finals. Perhaps they should implement a rule that if you have to use a timeout you get mildly penalized in some way in order to dissuade players from abusing it. For example, you lose your challenges or something in order to cut back on it.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
I have no doubt that sometimes people get injured. I don't think they should be disrupting the match as much as they do. Perhaps your opponent is more physically fit than you if you can't play well. If you cramp up in your legs you don't get to leave the court but if its your groin that's okay?
 

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Don’t hate the player, hate the game.

Athletes at this level, no matter what PR spin they use, have no issue bending or breaking rules to suit them.

There should be no medical time outs in tennis. Ant treatment should only be done on changeovers.

But if you do want them in tennis, and you want treatment, there should be escalating game and set penalties every time one is taken. Then the fake MTO’s cease to exist.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Don’t hate the player, hate the game.

Athletes at this level, no matter what PR spin they use, have no issue bending or breaking rules to suit them.

There should be no medical time outs in tennis. Ant treatment should only be done on changeovers.

But if you do want them in tennis, and you want treatment, there should be escalating game and set penalties every time one is taken. Then the fake MTO’s cease to exist.
I agree, the ATP needs to look at the medical time out rules and update them.
 

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It can't be an injury if the player suddenly plays better after the long delay. It's obvious a fake stall to break up the opponents winning rhythm and momentum. Playing possum and faking an injury to change a match is a part of the sport forever. The great players use it when needed. The great players do not unravel when used against them.
 

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Federer was clearly injured, you could tell just by watching him he couldn’t move well. Djokovic’s was just pathetic.
 

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Federer was clearly injured, you could tell just by watching him he couldn’t move well. Djokovic’s was just pathetic.
That's just your biased opinion. What matters is that the rule is available to every ATP player, they all are free to use it, and I didn't see Federer, Djokovic or Thiem complain when used by their opponents.

It's fun to watch Novak haters turning up the frustration and despair to 11. It's all in your head.
 

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It can't be an injury if the player suddenly plays better after the long delay. It's obvious a fake stall to break up the opponents winning rhythm and momentum. Playing possum and faking an injury to change a match is a part of the sport forever. The great players use it when needed. The great players do not unravel when used against them.
It's not called an injury timeout, but a medical timeout. You can absolutely be having a physical issue that doesn't constitute as an injury. Such as feeling light headed or dizzy. You can't receive treatment for cramping, but you can be treated for other things that are related to dehydration such as dizziness or feeling light headed.
 

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Federer was clearly injured, you could tell just by watching him he couldn’t move well. Djokovic’s was just pathetic.
Djokovic was clearly not feeling well, chugging water and energy drinks and eating bananas and dates like never seen before. Federer was just pathetic.

See, we can all play that game.
 

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That's just your biased opinion. What matters is that the rule is available to every ATP player, they all are free to use it, and I didn't see Federer, Djokovic or Thiem complain when used by their opponents.

It's fun to watch Novak haters turning up the frustration and despair to 11. It's all in your head.
Anyone with common sense can tell Federer was injured.
 

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Anyone with common sense can tell Federer was injured.
Actually, no, we have to take Federer at his word that he was not faking it. Unless the injury is an open wound with blood gushing through it, we have to take players at their word when they say that they are hampered by something. And unless there is clear and blatant evidence to the contrary, it's futile to call it into question because it's all about perception. Even with on-court performance, it's hard to tell for sure whether a physical issue is hampering play or if it's due to a psychological issue, whether connected to a physical injury or not. And then there are cases of visibly injured and limping players redlining and beating healthy opponents, even raising their level after injury and while limping around on court. What I'm trying to say is that things are a bit more complicated... Unless there is a clear benefit to the time-out, e.g. a visibly exhausted player needing a breather or a player disrupting an opponent who was painting the lines, a timeout is neither here nor there in terms of the result. It's more about the injured player collecting his own thoughts and maybe doing some placebo-style treatment to feel better (few injuries can be healed during a MTO) than disrupting the opponent in any way.
 

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Djokovic is not injured. He is just pissed Thiem is better from the ground.
He was definitely pissed - but at the umpire, not at Thiem. He applauded Thiem's shots as he usually does when his opponents play well... It's hard to say that Thiem was better overall, though, when the stats and the outcome tell a different story...
 

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It's not called an injury timeout, but a medical timeout. You can absolutely be having a physical issue that doesn't constitute as an injury. Such as feeling light headed or dizzy. You can't receive treatment for cramping, but you can be treated for other things that are related to dehydration such as dizziness or feeling light headed.
And yeah, this is also stupid. What makes cramps so different that you can't take a timeout for them while you can for "dizziness" (that's easily faked BTW). Either you should be able to take a timeout for everything including cramps, or nothing.
 

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It's crazy to me that you can't take medical timeout for cramps but can for dizziness. Cramps are freaking worse and heart like hell. There was something wrong with Djokovic today. Not sure what, but he looked all out of sorts. Thiem could have beat him. Djokovic took those medical timeouts against Stan and they didn't matter for sh1t. Also Djokovic has had some lossing matches where he did not take a timeout at all. Btw, when he takes a timeout and losses no one bitches, only when he takes it and wins.
 

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Actually, no, we have to take Federer at his word that he was not faking it. Unless the injury is an open wound with blood gushing through it, we have to take players at their word when they say that they are hampered by something. And unless there is clear and blatant evidence to the contrary, it's futile to call it into question because it's all about perception. Even with on-court performance, it's hard to tell for sure whether a physical issue is hampering play or if it's due to a psychological issue, whether connected to a physical injury or not. And then there are cases of visibly injured and limping players redlining and beating healthy opponents, even raising their level after injury and while limping around on court. What I'm trying to say is that things are a bit more complicated... Unless there is a clear benefit to the time-out, e.g. a visibly exhausted player needing a breather or a player disrupting an opponent who was painting the lines, a timeout is neither here nor there in terms of the result. It's more about the injured player collecting his own thoughts and maybe doing some placebo-style treatment to feel better (few injuries can be healed during a MTO) than disrupting the opponent in any way.
I get what you’re saying and it’s not always easy to tell whether the MTO was legitimate or not. Federer did look off movement wise though and his serve speed was lower than normal.
 
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