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Still, no one knows how to read Djokovic's game when Novak is in a good shape. And 10 years has passed and media can't read and analyze his game also. He is not a pattern player - he just changes things on the court and within the games. As soon as he sees that something is not working - he is changing it. That's why Medvedev played this way in the US final - he just played win - or - lose game. But in the second set he was 0:40 already - Djokovic just wasn't into the match because of the pressure I suppose - he couldn't move his feet - I am more inclined to believe it was more of a mental thing than e physical one. And it is normal. But certainly the guy can play multiple faceted games and strategic tennis on the court. Let's see if Medvedev himself can develop in similar department as he is also very intelligent player.
 

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Judging by how Felix is playing, one can guess why he couldn't analyze the Serbian pusher's game.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
In essence, Toni confesses the Serb’s tactics more advanced & intricate to decipher than the Swiss ballerina as reflected in H2H’s.
 

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In essence, Toni confesses the Serb’s tactics more advanced & intricate to decipher than the Swiss ballerina as reflected in H2H’s.
Excerpt from the Nadal's book "Rafa: My Story"

" ... Toni gestured, I took off the earphones. He said there was a rain delay, but for no more than fifteen minutes, they thought. I wasn’t fazed. I was ready for this. Rain would have the same effect on Federer as it would on me. No need to be thrown off balance. I sat down and checked my rackets, felt the balance, the weight; pulled up my socks, checked that both were exactly the same height on my calves. Toni leaned close to me. “Don’t lose sight of the game plan. Do what you have to do.” I was listening but I was not listening. I know at these moments what I have to do. I think my concentration is good. My endurance too. Endurance: that’s a big word.

Keeping going physically, never letting up, and putting up with everything that comes my way, not allowing the good or the bad—the great shots or the weak ones, the good luck or the bad— to put me off track. I have to be centered, no distractions, do what I have to do in each moment. If I have to hit the ball twenty times to Federer’s backhand, I’ll hit it twenty times, not nineteen. If I have to wait for the rally to stretch to ten shots or twelve or fifteen to bide my chance to hit a winner, I’ll wait. There are moments when you have a chance to go for a winning drive, but you have a 70 percent chance of succeeding; you wait five shots more and your odds will have improved to 85 percent. So be alert, be patient, don’t be rash. If I go up to the net, I hit it to his backhand, not to his drive, his strongest shot. Losing your concentration means going to the net and hitting the ball to his forehand, or omitting in a rush of blood to serve to his backhand—always to his backhand—or going for a winner when it’s not time. Being concentrated means keeping doing what you know you have to do, never changing your plan, unless the circumstances of a rally or of the game change exceptionally enough to warrant springing a surprise. It means discipline, it means holding back when the temptation arises to go for broke. Fighting that temptation means keeping your impatience or frustration in check.
Even if you see what seems like a chance to put the pressure on and seize the initiative, keep hitting to the backhand, because in the long run, over the course of the whole game, that is what’s wisest and best. That’s the plan. It’s not a complicated plan. You can’t even call it a tactic, it’s so simple. I play the shot that’s easier for me and he plays the one that’s harder for him—I mean, my left-handed drive against his right-handed backhand. It’s just a question of sticking to it. With Federer what you have to do is keep applying pressure to the backhand, make him play the ball high, strike with the racket up where his neck is, put him under pressure, wear him down. Probe ** that way in his game and his morale.

Frustrate him, drive him close to despair, if you can. And when he is striking the ball well, as he most surely will, for you won’t have him in trouble the whole time, not by any means, chase down every attempted winner of his, hit it back deep, make him feel he has to win the point two, three, four times to get to 15–love.
That’s all I was thinking, in so far as you can say I was thinking at all"
..."

isbn:0748129456 - Google pretraživanje

That is why our Rafito needed 35-40 seconds against Federer, no, not because 25 were not quite enough for the best athlete in the tennis world vs five year older opponent, but it would've meant much better chances for Ex-goaterer during the rallies, mucho more time before Federer's backhand starts spraying error after error, and would've consequently demanded some serious thinking & tactics during the course of the match on Rafa's part, and they (Rafito & UncleT) were too intelligent to allow it to happen, no.

Ex-goaterer had got all the authority needed for nipping it all in the bud, though, still, he remained pretty silent & reticent, so, all his Fedfandom could do for over a decade was just to patiently & stoically watch young Humbelito bery, bery humbly taking his 35-40 seconds between the points and pulling his kundalini out of his lower regions all the way up to his shoulders, nose, ears, forehead & forehand for another 30-40 stroke rally.

Well done & Congrats Tio T !
 

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Stretch botting makes Djokovic appear complex. When the stretch botting days are done, not much will be left of Djokovic. Any serious attempts at exhibitions with Federer will be sad to watch for his tards.
Balerina style makes Federer appear beautiful. When the balerina days are done after knee surgeries, not much beautiful will be left of Federer. Any serious attempts at exhibitions with anyone will be sad to watch for his tards.
 

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Balerina style makes Federer appear beautiful. When the balerina days are done after knee surgeries, not much beautiful will be left of Federer. Any serious attempts at exhibitions with anyone will be sad to watch for his tards.
The strokes and hand eye will see Federer through. He has the perfect game for old man tennis. Djokovic will be up the creek without a paddle once his gumbiness is gone. Federer will make mince meat of Novax in future exhibitions.
 

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When things are going great they all looked great. Yes there were numerous analyses of Roger, Rafa also like there are for Novak. The matter of fact is: Rafa's game and tactics are a bad match up for Roger. Novak nullifies it with his GOAT backhand. Fed had GOAT backhand on everyone except Rafa.

Novak bettered what Rafa used to be, the consistency and endurance. Novak was super good before as well, bettered him. Strategy wise - it was super clear.. hitting through him was next to impossible at Novak's best and of course he can then turn from defense to offense very well. Overall, he is a better player technically than Rafa.. I think. Is it hard to read the game? To me, Federer is also better player technically than Rafa, actually more complete player.. but not as consistent. Rafa with his unique game could exploit Roger, not Novak.. the better version of Novak.
 

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Tumaini Carayol, writing in The Irish Times last summer, expressed similar thoughts to Toni Nadal:

Those strengths lead people to characterise Djokovic as a relentless grinder. But he is so much more. His serve has grown into a quietly devastating weapon, constantly generating free points and short returns. On the slowest of slow clay he can shred any opponent to dust, yet on faster courts he can be ruthlessly efficient. Djokovic’s game is easiest to appreciate live, where the difficulty for opponents of his frequent direction changes and the varying amount of spin he puts on the ball are more clear. A large part of his greatness is that he is so difficult to read. He can approach a match however he likes and the person on the other side of the net will often not grasp his intentions until the match is done.
Mental clarity in chaos: Novak Djokovic, the man who turned two into three
 

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I don't think Joe's greatness is in his game but in his ability to deliver under pressure although he's had a lot of luck too which supports that narrative.

Joe is a defensive or defensive minded player which as great as it maybe will have it's limitations and falls short of attacking or attack minded players.

If you were a defensive player in the 90s you'd barely have success outside clay. That is not getting exposed in the current era because of playing conditions.

The greatest defender cannot be greater than the greatest attacker by default.
 

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I don't think Joe's greatness is in his game but in his ability to deliver under pressure although he's had a lot of luck too which supports that narrative.

Joe is a defensive or defensive minded player which as great as it maybe will have it's limitations and falls short of attacking or attack minded players.
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As you are well aware, Federer wouldn't quite agree with you there, considering that he used to emphasize Djokovic's offensive mindedness in their rubbers and constant powerful & deep shots on both wings, during quite a few post match press conferences and interviews, when he was describing the difference between playing Djokovic and other top ranked players.

Federer's interview back in 2014.


“I do believe that when you’re playing offensive you have to do less reacting,” says Federer. “Whereas if you’re always reacting to what your opponent gives, it’s very hard. Eventually throughout the week or throughout the year or throughout your career, if you’re always compensating and running after the ball, it’s going to catch up with you.
“But you can work on everything and the best players can play offensive and defensive. I guess Rafa [Nadal] and Andy have more the defensive DNA: they really don’t want to miss but today they’re great attacking players, some of the best in the game. And the same for me and Novak, we’re more attacking players but we’ve also gotten very good at defence.”

That season at Wimb'14 Djokovic made more winners than Federer (excluding aces)

Wimb'14:
Federer: 75 winners (29 aces); 29 UE
Djoker: 68 winners (13 aces); 27 UE

Wimb'15:
Fed: 58 winners (14 aces); 35 UE
Djokovic: 46 winners (13 aces); 16 UE
 

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Stretch botting makes Djokovic appear complex. When the stretch botting days are done, not much will be left of Djokovic. Any serious attempts at exhibitions with Federer will be sad to watch for his tards.
I doubt it, but this reminds of Agassi destroying Sampras some years ago. I was thinking "You can't play shit without the overpowered serve, heh?".
 

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As you are well aware, Federer wouldn't quite agree with you there, considering that he used to emphasize Djokovic's offensive mindedness in their rubbers and constant powerful & deep shots on both wings, during quite a few post match press conferences and interviews, when he was describing the difference between playing Djokovic and other top ranked players.

Federer's interview back in 2014.


“I do believe that when you’re playing offensive you have to do less reacting,” says Federer. “Whereas if you’re always reacting to what your opponent gives, it’s very hard. Eventually throughout the week or throughout the year or throughout your career, if you’re always compensating and running after the ball, it’s going to catch up with you.
“But you can work on everything and the best players can play offensive and defensive. I guess Rafa [Nadal] and Andy have more the defensive DNA: they really don’t want to miss but today they’re great attacking players, some of the best in the game. And the same for me and Novak, we’re more attacking players but we’ve also gotten very good at defence.”

That season at Wimb'14 Djokovic made more winners than Federer (excluding aces)

Wimb'14:
Federer: 75 winners (29 aces); 29 UE
Djoker: 68 winners (13 aces); 27 UE

Wimb'15:
Fed: 58 winners (14 aces); 35 UE
Djokovic: 46 winners (13 aces); 16 UE
Stats aside, everyone knows that Joe was atleast a little offensive in 08. After 2011 he turned into a defensive player.
Other than against dull on clay where Joe has to take the initiative and go for winners in the rally as dulls defense is superior, against all other players Joe is the more defensive player.

Against offensive players like Federer, Joe reverts to his usual patterns of play trying to outstamina Fed. He doesnt make any attempt to make quick work of Federer.
There's a reason why Joe can't beat players in straight sets and usually loses the first set.

Youre providing anecdotal evidence but I'm talking about intent. Forget about outright shotmakers like Safin and Fed or even Haas, Joe isn't even more aggressive than aggressive baseliners like Agassi or Davy or Nalbandian. Even against players like Medvedev hes clearly the defensive of the two.
 
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