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Hey

I find that in mainstream Australian there are things that people would be offended if you ask them, make a mention to them or to others, eg their age or weight. However these things are actually very normal conversation topic for those of my culture. Conversely, I find that many Australians would freely talk about their sexuality, sexual preferences and even experience which not many of those from my culture would openly speak to strangers (online) about.

What about you? Do you see any of these differences with your culture compared to others?
 

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Hey

I find that in mainstream Australian there are things that people would be offended if you ask them, make a mention to them or to others, eg their age or weight. However these things are actually very normal conversation topic for those of my culture. Conversely, I find that many Australians would freely talk about their sexuality, sexual preferences and even experience which not many of those from my culture would openly speak to strangers (online) about.

What about you? Do you see any of these differences with your culture compared to others?
A great idea for a thread, but sadly I don't know enough about other cultures to comment :sad: :eek: :facepalm:
 

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Being honest. :shrug:
 

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Being honest. <img src="https://www.tennisforum.com/images/smilies/shrug.gif" border="0" alt="" title="shrug" class="inlineimg" />
Hmmm... this is quite true. I’ll say it’s across for most cultures? I think there are things people prefer not to hear what you really think of them or of certain situations?
 

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World is steadily becoming a dreaded global village and traditional differences are becoming a thing of the past. Shoving your own sexuality and experiences down everyone's throats is now normal. There's nothing special or private about it anymore in dominant western culture.
Is that even culture? Seems more like anti-culture to me. Then again, the least cultured ones are the loudest so take their noise with the grain of salt. For example, here in the city center of the Belgrade, guys who sell souvenirs on the street are selling t-shirts with print: "Serbian triathlon: fuck, drink, eat" or vice versa. To me that sounds awful, but some foreigners will think this is our culture. We do have a lot of cheap tourism based on low alcohol and tobacco prices compared to EU.

Few differences: We will often argue to be ones who will pay the bill in bars, pubs, restaurants while foreigners will often pay each for themselves.
Also, "proud" cashiers in supermarkets and shops in Serbia will often not give you your change in hand and instead put it on the counter instead. I know some foreigners will consider that extremely rude. Again, not everyone is like that.
 

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Black Pete. Of course it offends me and every other sane Dutch person, but the majority of this fucked up country is still in favor of it.
 

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Blowing your nose in public (with handkerchief) is considered impolite in many Asian countries
 

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Taking up space.
 

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Blowing your nose in public (with handkerchief) is considered impolite in many Asian countries
well it is very impolite in my country of origin too (turkey), I was surprised as hell when I first traveled to western europe, like seeing people blow their nose in subways or trams, later in classrooms of my uni in Italy...it is very weird IMO. :lol: just go to restroom.
 

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Looking people in the eye while talking to them. In my culture, when you are young you are taught not to look an adult in their eyes, so your gaze should be at their chin downwards. It is a bit hard to outlearn this, as most Western cultures put so much emphasis at looking at the person directly in the eye, otherwise you are seen as untrustworthy or a liar.
 

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probably pigging out. In Chinese culture (well at least from what I have experienced) they LOVE when you want to eat and eat and eat during a get together meal, usually prepared by a host (or sometimes restaurant). People feel respected when you eat a lot. In fact if you don't eat, or eat a little the host will start to pile food into your bowl for you. I know in the west there is a lot of obesity and all, but I feel "pigging out" is sometimes frowned upon as being gluttonous.


Oh yeah, and it's totally normal to ask for takeway boxes to take leftover food home when going dining out. We don't like to waste food.

Looking people in the eye while talking to them. In my culture, when you are young you are taught not to look an adult in their eyes, so your gaze should be at their chin downwards. It is a bit hard to outlearn this, as most Western cultures put so much emphasis at looking at the person directly in the eye, otherwise you are seen as untrustworthy or a liar.
I could understand that as well. In the past you would have to bow down while speaking with the elders or superiors for instance.
 
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