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Discussion Starter #362 (Edited)
Thread update is on the way. My sincerest apologies for not having got round to it sooner as promised. But in the meantime, here are some interesting things that have transpired since the last major change to the OP:


Selected records which Roger has accomplished since last update:

Grand Slam related records:
  • His record of 62 consecutive appearances at Grand Slam tournaments is an ongoing record. He has the record for the most consecutive appearances at each stage of Grand Slam tournaments - 1st round, 2nd round, 3rd round, 4th round, QF, SF and F. Note that if he participates in 7 more slams he will have sole ownership of the record number of total appearances at each stage of Grand Slam tournaments too (at the moment he has 64 1st round appearances as opposed to Santoro’s 70).
  • He now has now overtaken Connors to clinch the record for the most Grand Slam semi-finals (36), quarter-finals (44) and overall match wins (285).
  • He has the most matches won on hard courts in Grand Slams (147).
World Tour Finals records:
  • He won his 6th title, eclipsing Lendl and Sampras on 5.
  • He has won 48 matches at this event, overtaking Lendl who had 39.
  • He has equalled a few records: total finals (9 - shared with Lendl), semi finals (12 - shared with Lendl) and appearances (13 - shared with Agassi). All his appearances were consecutive; 13 consecutive appearances is an outright record.
Title records:
  • He has become the only person to have won at least 1 title for 15 consecutive years on tour.
  • He has comfortably surpassed Vilas for the most outdoor titles. He now has 65, although Nadal is just 1 behind with 64.
  • He won a 6th year-end championship (now known as the World Tour Finals), breaking the tie he had with Lendl and Sampras.
  • In winning Halle 2015 he claimed the sole lead for the most ATP 500 titles (16). Nadal has 15.
Final records:
  • He appeared in 11 finals at his home tournament of Basel. This is the most number of finals contested at the same tournament. He also has 10 finals or better at Halle (Vilas had 10 at Buenos Aires).
Match winning records:
  • He has won the most matches won on hard courts (633).
  • He has now won more singles matches at the Olympic Games (13) than anyone else.
Ranking records:
  • He obtained a number of ranking records such as the longest time spent as #1 (302 weeks, overtaking Sampras’ 286 weeks), longest time spent in the top 2 (455 weeks and counting), the sole lead for the number of years finished in the top 2 (10 years - 5 years as #1 and 5 years as #2) etc.
  • He became the oldest player in the Open Era to finish the season ranked #2 at 33 years and 4 months. The next oldest was Agassi at 32 years and 8 months.

The above doesn’t count the categories in which Roger already held the Open-Era record but has further extended them (eg. Grand Slam tournaments won, grass court tournaments won etc).


There really is no finish line :)
 

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Yesterday Federer clinched sole ownership of the record for GS "winning or losing only to the eventual champ." Federer = 17 wins + 14 lost to eventual champ + Sunday's final = 32. Lendl is now at #2 with 8 + 23 = 31.
 

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After this Wimbledon, he now has 63 consecutive Grand Slam main draw appearances, beating the record of Ai Sugiyama.
 

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After this Wimbledon, he now has 63 consecutive Grand Slam main draw appearances, beating the record of Ai Sugiyama.
He's also increased his record of winning at least one match in each slam to 49. I have no idea if anyone is better in the WTA but I doubt it. I generally only compare to male players.

Djokovic could be a competor here also in the future, he's on 43 straight played and 38 straight won at least one match.
 

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I posted this on the Wimbledon thread, but perhaps There is no finish line is a better place for it.

I thought this was an excellent piece.

Don’t Feel Sorry for Federer
By Kate Battersby

A horrible trap lies in wait for all of us when discussing an underdog losing a match, and we’re never likelier to plunge headfirst into it than when a legend of the game is beaten by a world No.1 on the biggest stage of all.

We find ourselves applying a peculiar lexicon to the legend, of the kind suitable for some kind of cuddly toy. We reduce him to an adorable mascot for whom victory would have been a bonus, and who no longer experiences defeat as a lacerating wound. We do it because he is not 22 any more, and because he is loved.

Just don’t expect Roger Federer to thank you for it. He may be loved, but he has no interest in being adorable.

What he sought from the Wimbledon final 2015 was victory. He wanted to be the first man to take eight titles here. He wanted his 18th Grand Slam.

If that would have made him, at 33 years 338 days, the oldest champion here since the game turned professional, then so be it. What he absolutely specifically did not care about was next time, or last time, or any other time. He wanted what Novak Djokovic wanted, with the same stinging ambition as the Serb.

The hateful bottom line is this: on this day, Federer wasn’t good enough, and he knows it better than anyone. The champion defended his title 7-6(1), 6-7(10), 6-4, 6-3. For all the wonder of that second set, Federer had two points to win the first. What if he had led two sets to love? No point asking. He didn’t win it. Saving seven set points on the way to grabbing the second may have been astonishing to witness at courtside or on television worldwide, but it still left Federer an unconquerable distance from victory.

He lost, and he doesn’t want anyone’s sympathy, or – shudder – pity. To accept it would serve only to cheapen all that he achieved in his pomp. If there was no need for allowances back then, there is no need now.

“It’s always a mental and physical challenge to keep going, keep going,” he said tiredly. “I had chances. He got the break in the first set on a forehand I should not miss. Happy that I won the second set but still know I’m a long way away. A pity I couldn’t make more of the momentum. I couldn’t take advantage of the rain. I still won six matches. Lost one.”
In these post-match Q&As, he excels at betraying as little of his private hurt as possible, remaining at his most elaborately unruffled answering questions which effectively request that he bleed in front of the media. But the truth was evident in what was unsaid.

Witness his demeanour throughout the trophy presentation. Without ever erring towards the unsportsmanlike, he could hardly bear to look at Djokovic even fleetingly. Set aside any thoughts of dislike between them – the Swiss used unusually strong language this Fortnight to refute suggestions by Djokovic’s coaching consultant Boris Becker of any such thing. So let’s be clear – what turned Federer’s stomach was defeat.

“You walk away empty-handed,” he said. “For me a finalist’s trophy is not the same. Everybody knows that. I would have loved to win. There’s no doubt about that.”
He could not bring himself to gaze upon the famous golden trophy in the hands of another. When he was required to walk a circuit of the Centre Court with the plate he earned as runner-up, it was apparent in his body language that there could be nothing worse requested of him – and above all things, he could not lift the plate to the crowd. After all, someone might think that this was the trophy he actually wanted.

“I’m not going to accept losing and say it’s normal because I lost against the world No.1,” said Federer. “It’s not normal. I’ve beaten him. I’m one of the few guys that’s got a chance. I believed I was going to come through as the winner. I’m right there. My game is good.”

Courtesy is one of Federer’s on-court signatures, so do him the courtesy of judging him by the standards you judge all others. If you must make allowances, then make allowance only for brilliance – his own, and his opponent’s. Make allowance for that mind-blowing second set. Make allowance for the fact that out of seven billion people on this planet, the only one nearer to touching perfection in the art of tennis was on the opposite side of the net.

The sporting super-elite are not interested in coming second. What drives their necessarily lop-sided existence is a near-manic focus on victory. Nobody gets to be a legend by accident. It’s no use imagining that Roger Federer does not possess the same raging need to win on the basis that he looks nice and is a polite sort of chap.
What was it he said on court in those moments after defeat? Ah yes: “I am still very hungry and motivated and a match like this is very helpful.”

That chilly little phrase, “very helpful”… terrifying. Take it as read – Roger Federer lost, and that knowledge is burning him alive.
 

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Title #87: 2015 Cincinnati Masters. :dance:
 

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I think the only consecutive record he is still chasing is Connors' massive consecutive weeks in the top 10.

Federer is just 106 weeks behind with about 48 weeks guaranteed already (F Wim + W Cincy) will likely be enough to carry him through to 2016.

That means he is 58 weeks behind. Soon he'll begin making his assault on this record.
 

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I think the only consecutive record he is still chasing is Connors' massive consecutive weeks in the top 10.

Federer is just 106 weeks behind with about 48 weeks guaranteed already (F Wim + W Cincy) will likely be enough to carry him through to 2016.

That means he is 58 weeks behind. Soon he'll begin making his assault on this record.
Well, there's also he consecutive weeks in the top-100. Here he's actually closer to Connors. Here he's just 59 weeks behind with 51 more weeks guaranteed. This one he could actually make sure of getting this year, if he takes enough points in Paris/WTF
 

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Roger Federer becomes the first man to win 300 Grand Slam matches,
beating Grigor Dimitrov 6-4 3-6 6-1 6-4 in R3 of AO 2016. :cool:
 

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Another (strange) record : I read that Roger Federer is the player who has used the most hawk-eyes challenges since it was introduuced in 2006
622 times, for a success rate of 35%

Goffin leads with 44%
 

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Another (strange) record : I read that Roger Federer is the player who has used the most hawk-eyes challenges since it was introduuced in 2006
622 times, for a success rate of 35%

Goffin leads with 44%
Well, he's certainly played the most matches with it. Whenever they only have it on show courts, he's on a show court ;)

Must be a cutoff, though, to put Goffin in the lead. Surely someone managed 1 from 1.
 
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