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ridiculous rule :rolleyes: I'm surprised it's not done for the singles, yet...

http://www.sportingo.com/article/1001,5985

Roger Federer and Co. face a health threat in the ATP's war against 'tanking'

Federer, Andy Roddick and Justine Henin are hardly likely to quit a tournament with a bogus injury, but the administrators might have created a bigger problem for every player with their new rule.

The year 2007 was a rough one. It will be remembered not only for its great tennis, new heroes and faces, a new generation of young women players, the rise of Serbian tennis and of course, more of the Roger Federer magic – but also by scandals, cocaine, gambling, match fixing, even rumours of player poisoning and what has been known for years as 'tanking'.

While tennis officials are trying to figure out how to handle all these problems that seem to have surfaced in one single year, 'tanking' has been around forever in tennis – and until now a true solution has never been found.

However, a few months ago, the ATP announced that they had finally taken the first step towards finding an answer to the problem. They have introduced a rule, only valid for doubles matches (men and women) to start with. It's called the "doubles withdrawal rule" and it is aimed at preventing players from giving up matches using false injury reasons to leave in time to get to another tournament.

And the rule is new for doubles because players 'tanking' matches is much more common in doubles than singles. It comes into effect from the second round in any tournament, no matter at what level. So a player who announces, during a match that he or she is injured and cannot continue, has two choices:

He/she can quit the match in the middle and lose all points and prize money accumulated in the tournament up to that stage (be it first round or final), or he/she can simply "tough it out" and keep playing to the end.

Sounds good? To all 'tankers' of the game out there, the new rule is just a small nuisance.

OK, so they won't be able to 'tank' the second round doubles match in a God-forsaken hole in Africa or South America to make it on time to the next first singles qualifying match in another God-forsaken hole around the globe or, in many cases, just to make it on time for a flight home when they have had enough.

To all genuine injured players during matches, the new rule is plain hell, not to mention a real health threat.

Only when the first lawsuit by a player who kept playing with a career threatening injury comes around, will tennis officials realise what a huge mistake they have made.

An Israeli player by the name of Sahar Steel was playing in a doubles match last week in a Future Tournament in Ramat Hasharon, Israel. He injured his back during the match and couldn't move. When he told the umpire he needed to quit, the umpire brought the referee on court.

The referee informed suffering and amazed Steel of the new rule, and Steel, unfortunately needing all the points and money he can get his racket on in his struggling career, had no choice. He and his poor partner kept playing (if you could call that playing) to the bitter end, and there is no need to mention that they never won another point.

If the rule was introduced to prevent matches losing their 'sporting value' then what happened on the court from then on was even worse than your usual 'tanking'. It became a farce. The fact that Steel has been having, in the last four years or more, severe back problems that even required minor surgery at one point didn't make any difference.

As far as the new rule goes, every player is a 'tanker' unless proven otherwise. The problem is a huge one on the men's and women's Tour and that's a fact. But is this latest rule really the answer?

I would like to think that 'tanking' isn't a problem among the elite players. I really can't see players like Federer, Andy Roddick or Justine Henin 'tanking' matches that they regard as "less important". In their eyes there is no such thing as a "not important" match.

They have more than money and ranking points on their minds, and that is reputation, and we only need to ask Nikolay Davydenko how fragile that can be. And as far as the lower ranks go? Tennis will have to find a way to trust players. It's as simple as that.

The philosophy behind every professional sport should be that the cheater will only cheat one player at the end of the day, and that is himself or herself.

Drugs and gambling are problems that can, and will, be dealt with by a hard hand or rule. 'Tanking' is based on trust and more than that – the respect that players give to themselves and their profession.
 

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:retard:
 

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It is time for the players to create their own union, there must be a limit to stupidity.

Sadly, I don't think there is any remedy against tanking.
 

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This is a train wreck no matter how one sees it, here the union that is supposed to represent tennis professionals uses doubles players as experimental species before they impose that new innovation on the singles as well.
 

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Forum Umpire:, Gaston Gaudio,
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If the ATP took some of this stuff, then it would be still more logical than these choices.

 

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MONSOON season.
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It's a good initiative to try and address tanking, but the way that has been adopted to do so is just nonsensical :shrug: Not only will it lead to injured players aggravating their injuries, it will also lead to fewer players playing doubles, meaning a lot of Byes and weak teams in Challengers.

The only good thing is that it would somewhat restore the skewed balance of singles players playing doubles now, which makes doubles specialists lose out, but then again the ATP will try and fix that as singles players playing doubles generates more attention.

In the end, like with virtually all of De Villiers' plans, real fans lose out in a misguided effort to please casual spectators who wouldn't notice the difference in the first place.
 

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I saw that too yesterday in a Swiss blog, but when I tried to look up for more informations, I only found other blog entries repeating exactly the same stuff in different languages, which is a bit strange for a "rule" which is supposed to have been announced a few months ago already.
Does anybody have another source with more informations about that story?
 

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That's just idiotic, poor Sahar.

They are such idiots, he is a lowly ranked Israeli player playing in his one home tournament. The only place where he can make some money without bankrupting because of the flight costs - so he'll tank there? In front of home crowd??

RIGHT.
 

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Forum Umpire:, Gaston Gaudio,
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Got to give the brains at the ATP one thing in their favour.

All of us who can't handle and argue the whole time agree that the people who put these ideas through have no clue.
 

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:speakles: :speakles: :speakles:

I so hope this is indeed a bad joke... this is atrocious.
It actually is a disaster for ALL players. Apart from everything already mentioned... I thought Mr. Disney wanted to draw more attention/spectators to tennis in general?

Well, here we see the end of top players signing up for the doubles tournament, as I don't think any of those players want to get charged with 'tanking', while it's a known fact that quite a few of the top players play the doubles for mere reasons of getting adjusted to the surface, finding their rythm, etc more than anything else. And once they advance well in their singles tournament, it's only logical that they bounce out of the doubles, for whatever reason given... and now they'll have to give up their prize money for doing so??? I really wonder if there'll be any top player left to take this risk and actually sign up for the doubles tournament anymore.

ATP = :retard: :retard: :retard:
 

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:cuckoo: The ATP just keeps getting better...

I don't understand how this prevents "tanking". A player/team will just play like shit and loose fast. O.K. it does prevent the bogus withdrawal before a match starts but at what price -- the endangerment of the players with a real injury. Nothing can prevent a player from tanking but their personal integrity so get a grip ATP.

If the ATP is trying to grow doubles - I think they got it backwards. Wouldn't most fans like to see the Feds and Nadals play a match or two of doubles against doubles specialists and than have the "stars" withdraw over not having them play at all? Which is what will surely happen with this rule. Or they will still play a match or two and TANK (consciously or subconsciously) to concentrate on singles. But then I guess the ATP can slap them with the "Not Trying Hard Enough" Rule.
 
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