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Federer Fan & Dull Hater
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I'm no specialist in this area but wanted to know how MTF feels about these types of treatments.

Where should the line be drawn?

http://www.wada-ama.org/en/resources/q-and-a/human-growth-hormone-hgh/ - Link from Wada regarding HGH

http://www.drdavidgeier.com/platelet-rich-plasma-doping-performance-enhancing/ - Article about PRP and it's effects on the body.
We can read:
- "The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has been concerned that PRP has an ergogenic effect. While PRP is currently allowed, concern that it could increase levels of growth factors that are currently banned still exists."

- "A study in the January 2013 issue of the American Journal of Sports Medicine by Amy S. Wasterlain et al looks at the effects of PRP injections and if they increase levels of growth factors within the body. They measured levels of six growth factors thought to be performance enhancing by WADA in 25 athletes receiving PRP injections."


Imo when WADA has doubts regarding a treatment is should be banned and not allowed. Ban the treatment until studies are made that show the said treatment can't be used for performance-enhancing reasons.
 

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If it helps a fine player like Nadal return to the tour faster, who could be against it.:) I'm sure he and his team have carefully considered possible health effects.
 

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I heard potato nose is a sign of HGH.
 

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Your visions will happen
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Haters :facepalm:
 

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I'm no specialist in this area but wanted to know how MTF feels about these types of treatments.

Where should the line be drawn?

http://www.wada-ama.org/en/resources/q-and-a/human-growth-hormone-hgh/ - Link from Wada regarding HGH

http://www.drdavidgeier.com/platelet-rich-plasma-doping-performance-enhancing/ - Article about PRP and it's effects on the body.
We can read:
- "The World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) has been concerned that PRP has an ergogenic effect. While PRP is currently allowed, concern that it could increase levels of growth factors that are currently banned still exists."

- "A study in the January 2013 issue of the American Journal of Sports Medicine by Amy S. Wasterlain et al looks at the effects of PRP injections and if they increase levels of growth factors within the body. They measured levels of six growth factors thought to be performance enhancing by WADA in 25 athletes receiving PRP injections."


Imo when WADA has doubts regarding a treatment is should be banned and not allowed. Ban the treatment until studies are made that show the said treatment can't be used for performance-enhancing reasons.
Did he confess? I haven't kept up with the tennis news lately. Did he write his biography and confess to Armstrong khis idol?
 

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Now that Nadal apparently is going to use it, of course it should be illegal :worship:
 

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There is a misconception here.

If PRP is administered properly, any performance-enhancing effect would be small. It is a VERY localized injection, that shouldn't have a large effect on the recipient's overall fitness. So, it wouldn't add 10 mph to your serve, or anything.

The problem I have with it is, it doesn't work.

So, why is Rafa getting treatment's that are "curing" his joint injuries, when the treatment has been proven to work no better than a placebo ?


As far as HGH, it is illegal, except in very special circumstances (like Lionel Messi), and is usually only approved for young people with severe growth problems (not adults like Nadal).
 

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Wasn't PRP supposed to have healed Nadal's blister at the AO too? I thought that's why he had it then.

I must admit that one of WADA's comments along the lines of "we can't actually find convincing reasons to ban it at present" (definitely my words, not theirs) didn't sound like wholesale supporting of the technique.
 

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Without going into the technical specifics of various treatments, my view is that there will be some techniques that could be very effective at helping a serious injury to heal, and it is in everyone's interests that players can recover from serious injuries that might otherwise result in very lengthy lay-offs or retirement.

The concern is that some of these treatments might not just help the clinically proven wonky knee/arm/wrist to heal in impressive time, but give the player an over-all physical boost, giving them an unfair advantage over their peers.

If this is a possibility, then my solution wouldn't be to ban these treatments altogether, but for them to come with restrictions on when the player can next take part in a competitive match. They still won't miss as long as they might if they'd opted for surgery, but it reduces the likelihood of it being abused.

The minimum lay-off time would have to depend on the drug, and extent of its use, but I think most players and fans would be happy to accept the use of techniques that could reduce a six month lay-off to three months, but we'd be uncomfortable at using a controversial treatment the means someone is back in top form within a couple of weeks and playing better than ever.
 

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Without going into the technical specifics of various treatments, my view is that there will be some techniques that could be very effective at helping a serious injury to heal, and it is in everyone's interests that players can recover from serious injuries that might otherwise result in very lengthy lay-offs or retirement.

The concern is that some of these treatments might not just help the clinically proven wonky knee/arm/wrist to heal in impressive time, but give the player an over-all physical boost, giving them an unfair advantage over their peers.

If this is a possibility, then my solution wouldn't be to ban these treatments altogether, but for them to come with restrictions on when the player can next take part in a competitive match. They still won't miss as long as they might if they'd opted for surgery, but it reduces the likelihood of it being abused.

The minimum lay-off time would have to depend on the drug, and extent of its use, but I think most players and fans would be happy to accept the use of techniques that could reduce a six month lay-off to three months, but we'd be uncomfortable at using a controversial treatment the means someone is back in top form within a couple of weeks and playing better than ever.
Sensible post at first glance.

One trouble with this will be those substances that give longer lasting and sometimes semi-permanent effects like those from HGH and associated line of drugs or derivative treatments. If the performance boost were known and had a limited effect span, then sure, one could delay return to competition until after that span. A similar problem is that many prohibited substances may be used out of competition that allow one to train harder, build up muscle mass, endurance, etc. and have an athlete in superb condition, and even after tapering off the substance (it will not be detected), the beneficial effect will still be there as an advantage in competition. This is why sports such as cycling went for a far more aggressive out of competition testing regime, and tennis continues to lag far behind.

Reminder, there are very slim differences at the top levels of the sport. Any small edge is all that is needed for success. A performance enhancing drug isn't going to make a world champion out of a club level player, but it can definitely make a difference between similar level players.

Respectfully,
masterclass
 
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