Mens Tennis Forums banner

21 - 40 of 62 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,978 Posts
I can recall heat indexes in southern Florida of over 120 degrees . . . the humidity here can be up to 95% at times. IIRC, night temps in Texas in the summer are lower than in southern Florida. We can stay up in the 90s at night. Florida's climate is considered "humid subtropic," except south of Lake Okeechobee, which is a true "tropical" climate. I don't know if Texas fits that description. My recollection from visiting my uncle in Dallas many, many years ago is that once the sun set, the temperature really dropped.
It does get cooler during the night after the sun goes down- but can still remain pretty darned hot in Austin and Houston. Dallas, Austin and Houston are all classified as humid subtropic, but Austin is three hours south of Dallas- so there is a difference imo in the cities in terms of weather. Austin and Houston tend to resemble each other more in terms of weather than either do Dallas. Texas actually has a large variety in terms of weather since the state is so large.

All I know- is that it can get pretty darned hot here (in 2000 there were more than 40 days above 100 degrees) and that folks sometimes do make an effort not to play tennis in really hot conditions if they can avoid it. Same thing with other activities. You will find much fewere people on the hike and bike trails during the warmest part of the day than you will when it is a little better. As you and others have said- people do play in extreme conditions- but sometimes adjustments are made for the season.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,103 Posts
I'm not sure I agree with Hewitt. I agree that's it's the athlete's own responsibility to be sufficiently prepared for tournaments such as the AO whre they may have to deal with extreme temperature. I'm not sure the players should be forced to play in 40+ degree weather which seems extremely harsh to me. I was born in Aruba where it averages about 30-32 degrees Celsius every day and most people there would not be out playing tennis in the afternoon in 35 degree heats, so I can't even imagine what some of the days at the AO must be like.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,821 Posts
That's crazy. In that case, they should also play when the grass is wet or dewey. The heat rule is not designed to protect less conditioned players. It is to prevent any player, well conditioned or not from succumbing to something much more serious.

And amateurs playing in heat, where they can put in whatever ridiculous level of effort without consequence is miles away from pros playing a grand slam, best of 5, with real effort in that heat.
 

·
Motherhater
Joined
·
5,571 Posts
That's crazy. In that case, they should also play when the grass is wet or dewey. The heat rule is not designed to protect less conditioned players. It is to prevent any player, well conditioned or not from succumbing to something much more serious.

And amateurs playing in heat, where they can put in whatever ridiculous level of effort without consequence is miles away from pros playing a grand slam, best of 5, with real effort in that heat.
agreed. if hewitt understands the rain delay rule, he should be able to understand the heat rule.

has he complained about not playing in the rain?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
596 Posts
That's crazy. In that case, they should also play when the grass is wet or dewey. The heat rule is not designed to protect less conditioned players. It is to prevent any player, well conditioned or not from succumbing to something much more serious.

And amateurs playing in heat, where they can put in whatever ridiculous level of effort without consequence is miles away from pros playing a grand slam, best of 5, with real effort in that heat.
I agree with you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
753 Posts
I'll put it this way -- if doctors already classify 40 degrees Celsius as high-grade fever that can lead to convulsions, wouldn't baking under 43-degree heat be an equally alarming condition?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,633 Posts
I'm not sure I agree with Hewitt. I agree that's it's the athlete's own responsibility to be sufficiently prepared for tournaments such as the AO whre they may have to deal with extreme temperature. I'm not sure the players should be forced to play in 40+ degree weather which seems extremely harsh to me. I was born in Aruba where it averages about 30-32 degrees Celsius every day and most people there would not be out playing tennis in the afternoon in 35 degree heats, so I can't even imagine what some of the days at the AO must be like.
Coming from the tropics as well, I totally agree... strictly shade and A/C.

To quote a bit from Noel Coward:

"In tropical climes there are certain times of day
When all the citizens retire,
to tear their clothes off and perspire.
It's one of those rules that the biggest fools obey,
Because the sun is much too sultry and one must avoid
its ultry-violet ray --

At twelve noon the natives swoon, and
no further work is done -
But Mad Dogs and Englishmen go out in the midday sun."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,615 Posts
I don't agree. I mean yes, athletes should tough it out but it makes the matches far less interesting for the public to watch to guys struggle to walk out there in the sun. It's not even tennis anymore. Not only that, but it's dangerous for the players. Why not just play in the rain on grass courts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,159 Posts
No, they don't "have" to, but if they show up to play best-of-five in hot, humd conditions, having spent the last two months in a cold, dry climate, I seriously doubt that a "heat rule" is going to help them win the tournament. They can always bring their families with them to Florida or Spain or Australia. The Aussie Open's timing has always been a problem, which is why so many players used to skip it before its dates were moved.
Are you suggesting that the players from cooler countries could spend the off season away from home in some hot countries preparing for the AO? Sure, they could do that. Then again, we don't see that many US players participating in the big european clay tournaments, let alone practising in Europe.
 

·
#freeviktor
Joined
·
93,847 Posts
It's not like 35ºC isn't hot. It's still hot. Playing at that level will reward players with good fitness and who get used to temperatures. Playing at temperatures above that really rewards no one. I don't think spectators really enjoy when players are throwing up on court from the heat.

I was watching TTC's coverage of Hopman Cup last night and during changeovers, between matches, etc, they had little segments about different things leading up to the AO where there are little clips of players talking on different topics. Anyway, one of the topics was naturally, the new heat policy at the AO and unless I heard wrong, Ljubicic said that during one match at the AO he lost TWENTY POUNDS. That's obviously not healthy. Yes there are doctors who have IVs to help the players. But that's not preferable... shouldn't everything possible be done to avoid that?

I'm going to rewatch TTC because I want to hear that segment again, but I'm almost certain I heard that correctly.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Truc

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,615 Posts
It's not like 35ºC isn't hot. It's still hot. Playing at that level will reward players with good fitness and who get used to temperatures. Playing at temperatures above that really rewards no one. I don't think spectators really enjoy when players are throwing up on court from the heat.

I was watching TTC's coverage of Hopman Cup last night and during changeovers, between matches, etc, they had little segments about different things leading up to the AO where there are little clips of players talking on different topics. Anyway, one of the topics was naturally, the new heat policy at the AO and unless I heard wrong, Ljubicic said that during one match at the AO he lost TWENTY POUNDS. That's obviously not healthy. Yes there are doctors who have IVs to help the players. But that's not preferable... shouldn't everything possible be done to avoid that?

I'm going to rewatch TTC because I want to hear that segment again, but I'm almost certain I heard that correctly.
Is that possible? I need to do that:eek:!!!
 

·
#freeviktor
Joined
·
93,847 Posts
I didn't think so. I'm sure it was all water-weight but still.... The men in my family all wrestle, and I know they do crazy stuff to make weight but I've never heard of something so extreme before.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
810 Posts
Are you suggesting that the players from cooler countries could spend the off season away from home in some hot countries preparing for the AO? Sure, they could do that. Then again, we don't see that many US players participating in the big european clay tournaments, let alone practising in Europe.
I wish they would practice in Europe, maybe they'd win some tournaments there. Lazy bums!
 

·
Vamos Mandy :)
Joined
·
85,829 Posts
I do agree with Lleyton that sometimes folks have to tough it out- but there can be times when the heat can be so extreme that it could be potentially harmful. I do think that once you get into the 100s- there can be some issues that are not solely attributed to people being “wimps.”
I share this opinion exactly. At some point it gets so hot that it's not about being fit enough. It's about it being dangerous and the fact that different people's bodies react to extreme conditions differently - people's blood pressures are different, and all that kind of stuff, so for him to make such sweeping statements is a little bit silly. He also should know just as much as anyone that if the thermometer says 42C that it's significantly hotter than that on court. It simply reaches a point where it's unsafe.

And quite frankly, Hewitt is ignoring something else - spectators. I've watched tennis out at Indian Wells a couple times where it was 90+F and it was REALLY hot. I can't imagine the heat down there in Australia. Or does he expect all the spectators to be fit enough to sit out there and bake in the sun, too? :eek:
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
12,385 Posts
Ljuba Truba finds more excuses for another 2nd-3rd round loss in a slam.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,615 Posts
I share this opinion exactly. At some point it gets so hot that it's not about being fit enough. It's about it being dangerous and the fact that different people's bodies react to extreme conditions differently - people's blood pressures are different, and all that kind of stuff, so for him to make such sweeping statements is a little bit silly. He also should know just as much as anyone that if the thermometer says 42C that it's significantly hotter than that on court. It simply reaches a point where it's unsafe.

And quite frankly, Hewitt is ignoring something else - spectators. I've watched tennis out at Indian Wells a couple times where it was 90+F and it was REALLY hot. I can't imagine the heat down there in Australia. Or does he expect all the spectators to be fit enough to sit out there and bake in the sun, too? :eek:
Plus it produces crap tennis matches for those watching at home.
 

·
Your visions will happen
Joined
·
48,858 Posts
Ljuba Truba finds more excuses for another 2nd-3rd round loss in a slam.
Fed clown 2008 makes another stupid and irrelevent comment in a thread.

We should be accustomed to it by now.
 

·
Pacific Northwest Home
Joined
·
31,844 Posts
Heat stroke anyone?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
825 Posts
Answer from PHM :

"Hewitt, il joue quand en plein cagnard en Australie ? Vu que c'est la star ici, il a tout le temps droit à une programmation en nocturne. Il abuse. " :worship::devil::p

Translation :

"When did Hewitt really play with extreme heat ? As he's a star here, he always play in night session. He's exagerating."

Well said PHM, it's a bit unfair to say things like that when players don't have all the same conditions, isn't it ?
 
21 - 40 of 62 Posts
Top