Mens Tennis Forums banner

1 - 20 of 62 Posts

·
MTF. Never changes!
Joined
·
10,054 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Apologies if this has already been posted; I couldn't see it.

Lleyton Hewitt advised his fellow professionals to shape up or quit the sport after several raised concerns about rising temperatures on day one of the Adelaide International at Memorial Drive.

The forecast maximum of 43C was mercifully not reached on Monday, but a high of 42.1C soon after 1pm (CDT) was unpleasant enough to have vanquished fifth seed Radek Stepanek saying it was the hottest tournament he had played a part in.

Stepanek's conqueror, Australian wildcard Joe Sirianni, said it was possible the players would look for some consideration to be given to an extreme heat policy for all tour events.

But after losing his opening doubles match with fellow Australian Nathan Healey, Hewitt was adamant that the ATP Tour's non-implementation of a heat policy, in line with that employed by the Australian Open, was the right call.

"It's not comfortable for anyone to play sport on days like this, but that's what it's about though, gruelling out matches," Hewitt said.

"There shouldn't be a heat rule regardless, we're athletes and if you don't put in the hard yards then don't play.

"The Australian Open is the only tournament that has a heat rule, there's been a lot of guys cramping in the past in the US Open in tough conditions and they've never brought in a heat rule there.

"So it's only fair the ATP week in week out (don't), we're only playing best of three sets too, so if you can't last in that, then get a new job."

Hewitt and Healey went down in two and a bit sets, 6-3 7-5 and 10-8 in the match tiebreaker to American Eric Butorac and Canadian Frank Dancevic, saving Hewitt from the prospect of playing doubles and singles throughout a week of steep temperatures.

Having watched Hewitt at close quarters in his first match of the summer, Healey was impressed.

"He's hitting the ball great, he's fit and he's ready to fire," Healey said.
This article has been posted on numerous sites, my favourite being this one as it allows you to make comments. [No, I have not made any but you can use your imagination]
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,426 Posts
I'd say he has a point. I'd just rather that there were tourney's played in colder conditions, I do have to wonder if Lleyton would take this stance if there more tournaments played in Hamburg/Vegas night conditions:umbrella:?

I mean if there were no wind or rain - I'd quicker play in 0 degrees than 30+. But I do understand that colder venues are more likely to be effected by wind and rain so there will never be many matches at cold venues.

Anyhow going back to the topic, he has a point - players have plenty of time before the Aussie swing to go down under and acclimatise (or do it in Roehampton like Ivanovic), that said I'm not sure if I'd be able to play or even watch a match in 42degree heat.

EDIT: There's a Hewitt quote on this topic that I could'nt see above, something like ``if you only show up a couple of days before the tournament you're going to get found out`` and another about how there are iced towels by the players chairs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
810 Posts
I agree with Lleyton. Professional athletes should be well-conditioned and able to handle whatever weather is being thrown at them. Those tennis players who spend the time to become fit should be rewarded. Those who want to only play indoors, well, they're free to do so. :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,166 Posts
I'm sure many pros appreciate the life lesson from Dr. Hewitt.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,005 Posts
It's probably the first time ever, but I agree with Hewitt.
 

·
Occasional Visitor
Joined
·
52,208 Posts
This coming from a man who hasn't played a full ATP season for years :tape: Wonder how he would last in a "real job" only working 60% of his contracted working days? Ah well - :shrug:
 
  • Like
Reactions: Aphex and mir

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,159 Posts
I'm not sure I agree with Hewitt. It's not entirely about players' physical condition. It might actually be dangerous to play a long match in an extreme heat. Just imagine playing a tight match when the temperature is +45 and the sun is directly above. Cramps are not the real issue.

Besides, Hewitt has probably been playing in tight conditions all his life. Some of the players don't have the opportunity to get used to conditions like that since early age. (This is just an observation, I'm not saying the ATP should see it like that.) All I'm saying is that it can be dangerous to play in an extreme ehat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,695 Posts
I agree with Hewitt but it's easy for him to say this. He's been at home in Australia for months able to acclimatize to the heat in his home. Wonder if he would be so smug if he had to be away from his home for a few weeks during the holidays (and after a long season on the road) to train?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,133 Posts
Playing in 43 degree heat is halmful. There should be a heat rule.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
810 Posts
Playing in 43 degree heat is halmful. There should be a heat rule.
You should visit Florida in August. Amateurs in their 60s routinely play tennis in the heat and humidity here. My brother-in-law has played in a year-round, Sunday softball league for years, and they never cancel because of the heat. It's all a matter of conditioning and getting acclimated to the conditions. Europeans are such wimps when it comes to the heat. ;)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,222 Posts
Handling very hot temperatures is not the same as being fit.Some players obviously (naturally) handle the warmth better than others.
But i do agree that if a player get cramped in a fifth set in hot condition,it's because of his fitness.
 

·
Ace Loveforty
Joined
·
83,400 Posts
It's all a matter of conditioning and getting acclimated to the conditions. Europeans are such wimps when it comes to the heat. ;)
so a swedish player should go to Australia (or in another hot place) in november?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
810 Posts
so a swedish player should go to Australia (or in another hot place) in november?
He needs to go to a warm climate in time to get acclimated to playing best-of-five in hot conditions. That's why many top players have a training base in places like Florida, so they can practice outdoors year round in a warm-to-hot climate. Go watch who's practicing on the courts at Nick Bolletierri's academy or at Saddlebrook in December, and you'll see loads of Europeans.
 

·
Occasional Visitor
Joined
·
52,208 Posts
You should visit Florida in August. Amateurs in their 60s routinely play tennis in the heat and humidity here. My brother-in-law has played in a year-round, Sunday softball league for years, and they never cancel because of the heat. It's all a matter of conditioning and getting acclimated to the conditions. Europeans are such wimps when it comes to the heat. ;)
Not sure that playing any sport at amateur level is the same thing as playing in a major professional event, with all the mental/emotional tension and pressure that goes with it. As for us being wimps - well I admit I hate the heat and can't cope with anything over about 25 C, but this morning I waited for my train to work for an hour in sub-zero temperatures and didn't even wear gloves or a hat - forecast is -17 C here tonight :), so being a "wimp" is all to do with what you're used to! :angel: I've known loads for people from the Florida type areas, whingeing about the "cold" at Roland Garros and Wimbedon in the height of our Summer! It's all relative :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,978 Posts
You should visit Florida in August. Amateurs in their 60s routinely play tennis in the heat and humidity here. My brother-in-law has played in a year-round, Sunday softball league for years, and they never cancel because of the heat. It's all a matter of conditioning and getting acclimated to the conditions. Europeans are such wimps when it comes to the heat. ;)
I may be a little off with Florida weather- but does it often get up to 43 celsius there (which would be nearly 110 fahrenheit) in the tennis heavy areas? I know here in Austin it can get pretty hot and very humid- and folks do play in warm weather a lot- but in the summer- folks do try to avoid playing matches in the afternoon, so that people don’t have to play in 100+ degree heat if they can avoid it. So even with league play- they do try to avoid extreme heat if they can.

I do agree with Lleyton that sometimes folks have to tough it out- but there can be times when the heat can be so extreme that it could be potentially harmful. I do think that once you get into the 100s- there can be some issues that are not solely attributed to people being “wimps.”
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
596 Posts
Handling very hot temperatures is not the same as being fit.Some players obviously (naturally) handle the warmth better than others.
But i do agree that if a player get cramped in a fifth set in hot condition,it's because of his fitness.
I don't know. I think its a combination of exhaustion, heat and fitness.
 

·
Ace Loveforty
Joined
·
83,400 Posts
He needs to go to a warm climate in time to get acclimated to playing best-of-five in hot conditions. That's why many top players have a training base in places like Florida, so they can practice outdoors year round in a warm-to-hot climate. Go watch who's practicing on the courts at Nick Bolletierri's academy or at Saddlebrook in December, and you'll see loads of Europeans.
so, in the only 2 months in which they dont play on the tour they have to leave their families to get acclimated to the weather?
I agree that they are pros and need to do what is more necessary for their careers but it's not Hewitt who should speak about this like The Cat Lady said before
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
810 Posts
I may be a little off with Florida weather- but does it often get up to 43 celsius there (which would be nearly 110 fahrenheit) in the tennis heavy areas? I know here in Austin it can get pretty hot and very humid- and folks do play in warm weather a lot- but in the summer- folks do try to avoid playing matches in the afternoon, so that people don’t have to play in 100+ degree heat if they can avoid it. So even with league play- they do try to avoid extreme heat if they can.

I do agree with Lleyton that sometimes folks have to tough it out- but there can be times when the heat can be so extreme that it could be potentially harmful. I do think that once you get into the 100s- there can be some issues that are not solely attributed to people being “wimps.”
I can recall heat indexes in southern Florida of over 120 degrees . . . the humidity here can be up to 95% at times. IIRC, night temps in Texas in the summer are lower than in southern Florida. We can stay up in the 90s at night. Florida's climate is considered "humid subtropic," except south of Lake Okeechobee, which is a true "tropical" climate. I don't know if Texas fits that description. My recollection from visiting my uncle in Dallas many, many years ago is that once the sun set, the temperature really dropped.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,695 Posts
Handling very hot temperatures is not the same as being fit.Some players obviously (naturally) handle the warmth better than others.
But i do agree that if a player get cramped in a fifth set in hot condition,it's because of his fitness.
Actualy cramping in not necessarily related to not being fit or conditioned for the heat. It is a biochemial reaction in the body and some people even though they are extremely fit are more prone to cramp than others. I live along the Gulf Coast of the US where the heat and humidity is often unbearable in the summer - so I am quite familar with athletes who cramp. There are things one can do to help prevent cramps (and that includes training in the heat) but if your body is prone to cramping it just might cramp no matter what under extreme conditions. SO it always bothers me when I hear people say someone cramped because they were not physically fit. They may not have prepared their body for the heat conditions but they could still be extremely fit.

And as someone else said there are tons of people - kids and adults who play in extreme heat and humidity all summer in the U.S. While most don't play with anywhere near the intensity of the professional athletes, I've seen many juniors play 5 - 6 sets in one day and come back to play more the very next day. Most are O.K. but I have also seen a few taken to a hospital for IVs.

No one likes playing in such oppressive conditions but the tournaments are well staffed with trainers and medical support to help the athletes through it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
810 Posts
so, in the only 2 months in which they dont play on the tour they have to leave their families to get acclimated to the weather?
I agree that they are pros and need to do what is more necessary for their careers but it's not Hewitt who should speak about this like The Cat Lady said before
No, they don't "have" to, but if they show up to play best-of-five in hot, humd conditions, having spent the last two months in a cold, dry climate, I seriously doubt that a "heat rule" is going to help them win the tournament. They can always bring their families with them to Florida or Spain or Australia. The Aussie Open's timing has always been a problem, which is why so many players used to skip it before its dates were moved.
 
1 - 20 of 62 Posts
Top