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As the title says, do you think Rafael Nadal would have retired in the semi-final of the US Open 2018 against Juan Martin Del Potro if he had won the highly competitive first set.

In this set, Rafael Nadal played at an incredibly high level. Breaking right back after the opening game, and then again at 5-4 when Delpo was serving for the set, Nadal had all the momentum going into the tie break.

His movement in the first set was unblemished. Running side-to-side faster than ever, chasing down balls, putting himself in positions to hit big winners and picking off everything coming his way, it is hard to imagine that Nadal's knee was bothering him in the first set.

However by is own confession, Nadal said he got injured in the 3rd or 4th game of this set. If he did, it at least did not effect his game right away. The injury started to have an impact in the second set.

It's not uncommon for an injury to progressively get worse over time. So it makes sense that the impact could be felt only a hour later after the injury occurs.

Some of it is also mental. Once he lost the first set, the pressure was off Delpo and he unleashed his big forehands. Under such bombardment, it would be hard to stay mentally focused and the suffering caused by the pain of the injury begins to take hold.

Thus I ask the question, how much of this was mental? Would he have retired if he had won the first set?
 

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Ofc he wouldn't. It was obvious to me the injury was fake. He knew with his energy level being so low there was no way to come back from 2 sets down so fake an injury so he will have something to blame as usual, nothing new
 

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Assholes on here never played any intese sport in their lives

Of course he would have retired. Lesion in the tendon, hello, you cannot go any further. I'm surprised he even finished two sets

That war with Thiem was too much
 

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I cannot recall any player retiring from a big match while leading, unless they were so badly injured that they literally couldn't play any more. I'm sure it has happened, but I can't recall it occurring. Every time I've seen someone get a bad injury while leading, they soldier on and try to win the match, sometimes retiring when they're behind. But I can't recall any examples of someone being a set up and quitting, unless they can't play at all.
 

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No. Not until he were 1-2 in sets.

Well, you never know what's gonna happen. If you are still able to play (not your best but still) and leading by a set, why retire? It's possible Del Potro would catch an injury too so he would continue playing at least until 1-2 in sets or even behind.

BTW, his injury is not serious as reported today.
 

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I don't think 1st set was high level of tennis. It was up and down. Fresh Nadal would dismantle Del Potro playing on that level.
I'm not sure if he would retire if he'd won 1st set. Maybe he would have stayed a bit longer on the court.
 

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It depends on how the match would've progressed from the 2nd set onwards. Given that his condition got worse as time went on, the only way for him to avoid retirement would've been to win the match in straight sets in a relatively short time, i.e. no more than 2 1/2 hours.

Given Delpo's solid form, however, I think Nadal was going to be forced to retire, no matter what, because beating Delpo in straight sets was just not gonna happen.
 

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I'm not a tennis player so I can't claim to know how they feel, but most retirements happen in a losing position. This suggests that the injured player if leading, continues trying until the inevitable happens. Basically, being in the lead, gives them hope that they are still in it, but they know deep down that it will go downhill soon, so when they start losing, they retire.

To answer your question, I think if wins the first set, he continues, but he would still retire, either in the second or third.
 

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I cannot recall any player retiring from a big match while leading, unless they were so badly injured that they literally couldn't play any more. I'm sure it has happened, but I can't recall it occurring. Every time I've seen someone get a bad injury while leading, they soldier on and try to win the match, sometimes retiring when they're behind. But I can't recall any examples of someone being a set up and quitting, unless they can't play at all.
There are many examples of players retiring when winning/even - some top ones (hard to determine when someone can play and can't play at all):

Djokovic: Retirements: (0-12) winning: 2, losing: 10, even: 0
8‑Feb‑2008 Davis Cup WG R1: RUS vs SRB Hard RR Nikolay Davydenko [RUS] d. Djokovic 4-6 3-6 6-4 0-0 RET
24‑Jul‑2006 Umag Clay F Stanislas Wawrinka [SUI] d. (4)Djokovic 6-6(1) RET (Djokovic ahead 3-1 in TB)

Murray: Retirements (0-2) winning: 1 , losing: 0, even: 1
12‑May‑2013 Rome Masters Clay R32 Marcel Granollers [ESP] d. (3)Murray 6-3 6-7(5) RET
14‑May‑2007 Hamburg Masters Clay R64 Filippo Volandri [ITA] d. (9)Murray 1-5 RET

Davydenko: Retirements (0-22) winning: 4 losing: 16 even: 2
20‑Feb‑2012 Marseille Hard R16 (4)Juan Martin Del Potro [ARG] d. Davydenko 6-7(6) 6-4 RET
23‑Oct‑2006 St. Petersburg Carpet R16 Wesley Moodie [RSA] d. (1)Davydenko 2-6 3-3 RET
4‑Jul‑2005 Gstaad Clay R32 Sargis Sargsian [ARM] d. (1)Davydenko 1-6 0-1 RET
20‑Jun‑2005 Wimbledon Grass R64 Jonas Bjorkman [SWE] d. (8)Davydenko 6-7(4) 1-2 RET
17‑May‑2004 St. Poelten Clay QF (6)David Sanchez [ESP] d. (3)Davydenko 3-6 6-1 RET
17‑Feb‑2003 Memphis Hard R32 (Q)Magnus Norman [SWE] d. (7)Davydenko 4-6 RET

Sampras: Retirements (0-7) winning:3 losing:3 even:1
16‑Aug‑1999 Indianapolis Hard QF Vincent Spadea [USA] d. (1)Sampras 6-4 3-6 RET
19‑May‑1997 Dusseldorf Clay RR Mark Philippoussis [AUS] d. Sampras 4-6 6-4 0-1 RET
24‑Apr‑1995 Monte Carlo Masters Clay R32 Paul Haarhuis [NED] d. (1)Sampras 4-6 1-1 RET
18‑Feb‑1991 Memphis Hard R16 (15)Mark Koevermans [NED] d. (2)Sampras 2-6 1-1 RET

Agassi: Retirements (0-10) winning: 2, losing: 7, even: 1

12‑Jun‑2000 Queen's Club Grass R16 Gianluca Pozzi [ITA] d. (1)Agassi 4-6 3-2 RET
19‑Feb‑1990 Philadelphia Carpet R16 (13)Pete Sampras [USA] d. (3)Agassi 5-7 7-5 RET
28‑Feb‑1989 Dallas WCT Carpet QF (1)John Mcenroe [USA] d. Agassi 4-6 3-0 RET

Edit: In my opinion, a player should only retire if one is so injured or ill that one cannot step up to the line to serve or to return at all, otherwise one should stand up at the line, and take the loss no matter how terrible one looks doing it. Anyway, I'm old school, and that is how I played.

Respectfully,
masterclass
 

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Its kind of hard to play tennis.... when you are in pain just WALKING. You can play (and win) tennis being ill, under the weather or being affected under outside elements like big humidity, you CAN'T play tennis when walking in pain


Its about the bigger picture for Rafa. He has to win slams next year. No point in playing in pain when this year is already lost the USO when you got Del Potro/Joker in your way.


If he didn't lose to Del Potro (Somehow toughing through the match which would be impossible anyways) he would have been in severe pain playing Djoker. You can't be that type of opposition in the condition Nadal was in. Now maybe if he had two creampuff opponents sure.
 

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has Nadal ever retired while leading in a GS match?

there's your answer
 

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Discussion Starter #19
There are, obviously, two angles to my question.

First (and the most obvious one given the polarity of this forum and Nadal's past history) is the allegation whether he was faking it given he knew he was too tired to beat Del Potro.

The second slant here is the mental aspect. Does impending victory help diminish (at least momentarily) the physical pain and suffering. I alluded to this in my original post, so I hope [email protected] read my initial post completely and comprehend it before spraying an emotional response. Thank you.

Rafa himself said he got injured in the 3rd/4th game of the first set, and his game wasn't affected from then till the end of the first set. Hence my initial question, how much of this was due to disappointment and mental fatigue rather than just injury alone?
 

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Ofc he wouldn't. It was obvious to me the injury was fake. He knew with his energy level being so low there was no way to come back from 2 sets down so fake an injury so he will have something to blame as usual, nothing new
Well it's not like the injury suddenly occurred when he was 2 sets down. He was getting his knees taped up at the start of the match, so was obviously struggling as the match progressed.
 
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