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Discussion Starter #1
What are some of the coolest displays of good sportsmanship you have seen exhibited in pro tennis?

Tim Smyczek giving the point to Rafa in Australia.
Rafa Nadal clapping for this beaten opponent as they walk off the court in defeat.
Roger Federer sitting with his old friend Dominik Hrbaty during changeovers at Dominator's fnal wimbledon.
Todd Martin and Carlos Moya's entire careers.

Patrick Rafter has three unbelievably nice examples in this article.


Please share more good sportsmanship examples you witnessed...

Hope to make this a very long thread and not a very short one :)
 

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Discussion Starter #2
The ATP designated the Sportsmanship Award in the name of Stefan Edberg, but I am unaware of any actual examples of his excellent sportsmanship beyond always carrying himself as a class act on and off court. Did Edberg ever do anything like Rafter did in the article?
 

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What are some of the coolest displays of good sportsmanship you have seen exhibited in pro tennis?

Tim Smyczek giving the point to Rafa in Australia.
Rafa Nadal clapping for this beaten opponent as they walk off the court in defeat.
Roger Federer sitting with his old friend Dominik Hrbaty during changeovers at Dominator's fnal wimbledon.
Todd Martin and Carlos Moya's entire careers.

Patrick Rafter has three unbelievably nice examples in this article.


Please share more good sportsmanship examples you witnessed...

Hope to make this a very long thread and not a very short one :)
Actually, Scoop, it was Dominik Hrbaty who sat with Roger Federer.
 

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Roddick against Verdasco in the Rome Masters in 2005.

He led 7-6,5-3 and had 0-40 on Verdasco's serve when Verdasco double faulted and the umpire announced Roddick the winner.

Roddick told the umpire the 2nd serve was in and he shortly after lost the point,failed to convert his 2 other matchpoints,lost the game and then got immediately broken thereafter and went on to lose the match.

Mind you,the match was on clay and Roddick did say that he saved the umpire a trip to get out of his chair because he knew the ball would've been called in anyway.
 

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Delpo comforting Almagro, 2nd round RG17, one set all, one game all. With all he's been through as a player, it would be very easy to become selfish, but he was entirely focused on Almagro. Still one of the most emotional tennis moments ever in all aspects.
 
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Discussion Starter #7
Nice anecdotes, hope to read many more...

Rafter still the boss of sportsmanship though...
 

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1982 FO SF - Wilander v Clerc.

Wilander was 17 years old and on match point Clerc's forehand was contentiously called out and the umpire called game, set and match to Wilander.

Wilander asked for the point to be replayed.

 

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1982 FO SF - Wilander v Clerc.

Wilander was 17 years old and on match point Clerc's forehand was contentiously called out and the umpire called game, set and match to Wilander.

Wilander asked for the point to be replayed.

These always happen on clay, when the point would have eventually been replayed once umpire check the mark..

Have such anecdotes occurred on other surfaces after glaring umpires mistakes on key points?
 

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Every time Djokovic gives a point to the opponent ruled wrongly by the umpire, and claps for them for a great shot, an angel is born, a star becomes brighter and the heavens sing.

And he is not a bad loser, he always remains gracious. The handshakes at the net when he has lost or has won remain the same. On the other hand, the losing opponent always looks bitter, and their demure sour when they have lost.
 

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These always happen on clay, when the point would have eventually been replayed once umpire check the mark..

Have such anecdotes occurred on other surfaces after glaring umpires mistakes on key points?
True.

But if you watch the footage the umpire called game, set, match and got off his umpire's chair. He refused to look at the mark to Clerc's chagrin.

Wilander could have walked off there and then.

That's the difference.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
What is Kyrgios giving Tsip?
 

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What is Kyrgios giving Tsip?
His shoes. Tsitsipas repeatedly broke his shoelaces in D.C. last summer and he gave them to his dad to fix. When he was done, Kyrgios ran over to Tsitsipas’ dad and brought his re-laced shoes back to him. Maybe not the greatest example of sportsmanship, but a great interaction between players.
 

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Every time Djokovic gives a point to the opponent ruled wrongly by the umpire, and claps for them for a great shot, an angel is born, a star becomes brighter and the heavens sing.

And he is not a bad loser, he always remains gracious. The handshakes at the net when he has lost or has won remain the same. On the other hand, the losing opponent always looks bitter, and their demure sour when they have lost.
Good points. Exactly, that is one of many things that seperates him from others and truly his sportsmanship is one of the reasons why I love him. Not a sore loser but gracious and respectful.
 

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Djokovic has been the most impressive at the French Open in my opinion. He came up short very often and always was very gracious to his opponent
 

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Discussion Starter #17
You're right. Of all the all time great tennis champion, Djokovic shows the most graciousness and sportsmanship at the handshake after losing. He is simply the best at it, even after the most bitter heartbreaking losses he still forces himself to show the opponent a smile and gratitude for the great performance. It's really special and awesome. He didn't do it as well when he was younger. Perhaps he matured and or saw that Federer and Nadal are very average or typical at the post match handshakes, Fed and Rafa are seething inside and you can sense it but they supress it. Djokovic is different. He actually will smile and show warmth to the opponent. Federer is ice cold when he loses to Djokovic, he recoils when Djokovic tries to embrace him. But when Fed beats Djokovic, Djokovic shows more warmth. Perhaps Djokovic saw the handshakes as a chance to show superiority to the public, superiority to Federer and Nadal. In terms of sportsmanship and graciousness at post match handshakes, Djokovic is clearly superior to Fed and Rafa.
 

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You're right. Of all the all time great tennis champion, Djokovic shows the most graciousness and sportsmanship at the handshake after losing. He is simply the best at it, even after the most bitter heartbreaking losses he still forces himself to show the opponent a smile and gratitude for the great performance. It's really special and awesome. He didn't do it as well when he was younger. Perhaps he matured and or saw that Federer and Nadal are very average or typical at the post match handshakes, Fed and Rafa are seething inside and you can sense it but they supress it. Djokovic is different. He actually will smile and show warmth to the opponent. Federer is ice cold when he loses to Djokovic, he recoils when Djokovic tries to embrace him. But when Fed beats Djokovic, Djokovic shows more warmth. Perhaps Djokovic saw the handshakes as a chance to show superiority to the public, superiority to Federer and Nadal. In terms of sportsmanship and graciousness at post match handshakes, Djokovic is clearly superior to Fed and Rafa.
He sure is
 

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Discussion Starter #19
He's human. Everyone feels rage sometimes. Tennis is an extremely stressfun tense business. Dealing with the pressure being the world's best player magnifies it even more. Every great champion has his moments of regret and vulnerability.
 

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These two are the only ones to succeed Federer and Nadal in all aspects. Looks like they geniunely like each other as well and they're already important for ticket sales.
 
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