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What is your religion/worldview?

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List should include spirituality. I.e having an understanding of the universe and reality but not being tied to a specific religion or doctrine.
 

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It seems to me that the same thing awaits us after death as it was before our birth. Although it is difficult to imagine how I don't exist at all, in fact we are constantly awake, and sleep for us feels like a couple of minutes.
 

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I'm not so sure that all the bad perpetrated in the name of religion doesn’t outweigh all the good.
Well, that's a long discussion and most likely, on a global level, the bad would be more than the good overall. But on an everyday, personal level, I would say religion brings more good than bad.
I'm an atheist who is very happy to live in a time where religion slowly loses it's power. It hasn't done any good for mankind.
Imagine thinking that if it wasn't in the name of God, evil wouldn't have happened in other forms.
 

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I envy religious people in the way that dying for you all must be such a trivial thing. Just moving on. I'm afraid I don't have that luxery.
 

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Really? I see it the other way around. I have not settled where I stand on the question of God's existence and eternal fate, but if the materialist outlook is right, then death is very trivial. We will die without having to worry about divine judgement for our actions, and what could be easier than that? Fear not the judgement of other men, nor of "history". These are trifles.

On the other hand, if (e.g.) orthodox Christians are right about God, then death is the least trivial thing imaginable: it is a start rather than an end, and it will either lead to eternal separation from God or to total reconciliation (and even theosis or divinisation). Religions based around reincarnation have similarly weighty implications about death.

I agree that the fear of death is alleviated if you have faith that God will forgive your sins and that your soul will be reconciled with Him. Given that Pride is the original and greatest sin, though, I don't see that anyone could live on the assumption that they are guaranteed a place in heaven – even if you do think you will go to heaven, a long and difficult purgation of sin might precede it, and that could be more difficult than any of the pains experienced in our mortal lives.
 

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Discussion Starter · #369 ·
Really? I see it the other way around. I have not settled where I stand on the question of God's existence and eternal fate, but if the materialist outlook is right, then death is very trivial. We will die without having to worry about divine judgement for our actions, and what could be easier than that? Fear not the judgement of other men, nor of "history". These are trifles.

On the other hand, if (e.g.) orthodox Christians are right about God, then death is the least trivial thing imaginable: it is a start rather than an end, and it will either lead to eternal separation from God or to total reconciliation (and even theosis or divinisation). Religions based around reincarnation have similarly weighty implications about death.

I agree that the fear of death is alleviated if you have faith that God will forgive your sins and that your soul will be reconciled with Him. Given that Pride is the original and greatest sin, though, I don't see that anyone could live on the assumption that they are guaranteed a place in heaven – even if you do think you will go to heaven, a long and difficult purgation of sin might precede it, and that could be more difficult than any of the pains experienced in our mortal lives.
Indeed.
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Ironically, but not necessarily in contradiction, the same author also says:
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Death is the grand equalizer

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And of all places I ponder about in the Bible, is the shortest (English) verse: "Jesus wept" (John 11:35)

The Resurrection and the Life could weep uncontrollably over the death of Lazarus? What would drive such a response? Unless it were not such a trivial matter after all...
 

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I envy religious people in the way that dying for you all must be such a trivial thing. Just moving on. I'm afraid I don't have that luxery.
I dunno about that.
Death is still very real, especially once you have lost a parent etc, and your age is now much more likely closer to death than birth.
It's nothing trivial, as I cannot say with certainty what is waiting on the other side.
The diversity of interpretations between religions and within Christianity itself, is quite extreme,
 

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Really? I see it the other way around. I have not settled where I stand on the question of God's existence and eternal fate, but if the materialist outlook is right, then death is very trivial. We will die without having to worry about divine judgement for our actions, and what could be easier than that? Fear not the judgement of other men, nor of "history". These are trifles.

On the other hand, if (e.g.) orthodox Christians are right about God, then death is the least trivial thing imaginable: it is a start rather than an end, and it will either lead to eternal separation from God or to total reconciliation (and even theosis or divinisation). Religions based around reincarnation have similarly weighty implications about death.

I agree that the fear of death is alleviated if you have faith that God will forgive your sins and that your soul will be reconciled with Him. Given that Pride is the original and greatest sin, though, I don't see that anyone could live on the assumption that they are guaranteed a place in heaven – even if you do think you will go to heaven, a long and difficult purgation of sin might precede it, and that could be more difficult than any of the pains experienced in our mortal lives.
I dunno about that.
Death is still very real, especially once you have lost a parent etc, and your age is now much more likely closer to death than birth.
It's nothing trivial, as I cannot say with certainty what is waiting on the other side.
The diversity of interpretations between religions and within Christianity itself, is quite extreme,
I never understood people on this day and age to be afraid of their god if they live normal lives or have done some minor things. Or for that matter, that something you can do here will cost you your eternal bliss. I've studied theology as part of my history education (because I think it important knowledge for a historian, not out of believe) so I've read plenty on it, and I can understand it working on people some time ago. As a scare tactic, to control people. But people today I always hope are a little more free in making their own opinion on this topic.
 

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I never understood people on this day and age to be afraid of their god if they live normal lives or have done some minor things. Or for that matter, that something you can do here will cost you your eternal bliss. I've studied theology as part of my history education (because I think it important knowledge for a historian, not out of believe) so I've read plenty on it, and I can understand it working on people some time ago. As a scare tactic, to control people. But people today I always hope are a little more free in making their own opinion on this topic.
If you try a little harder to view the question from the perspective of the believer, rather than reducing it to an anthropological curiosity for the historian of social power relations, perhaps it will make more sense. Salvation has always been interpreted as being conditional on faith and/or works. I don't see why it should be hard to understand that disobedience of God's will should lead to a severance of the individual soul from God. That is what sin means in a theological sense: detachment from God, as a free choice by a free moral agent. If acts are not free, then moral consequences mean nothing at all (that is true whether or not God exists, though the question of moral foundations is a difficult challenge if God does not exist).

It makes perfect sense to me that a person who has freely chosen to reject God's grace should receive a punishment for doing so. Conversely, it makes sense for a merciful God to offer forgiveness through the sacrament of reconciliation to those who choose to accept it.

Thankfully, you are right that people are indeed free to draw their own opinions. We always have been. The Old Testament is notoriously filled with examples of God's own chosen people making covenants with him, and then deciding to completely ignore the commandments given to them as a condition of the covenant (even when they have, in these accounts, been direct recipients of revelations and have no reason to doubt God's existence and authority; even Moses does not get to the Promised Land). People being free to make their own decisions is not new, but if God does exist and has revealed certain things about salvation, then some choices are objectively wrong whether we like it or not. If God does not exist, then it is quite a significant liberation from moral constraints, as Nietzsche pointed out, though few have tried to challenge the social and ethical implications as seriously as that great philosopher.
 

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If you try a little harder to view the question from the perspective of the believer, rather than reducing it to an anthropological curiosity for the historian of social power relations, perhaps it will make more sense. Salvation has always been interpreted as being conditional on faith and/or works. I don't see why it should be hard to understand that disobedience of God's will should lead to a severance of the individual soul from God. That is what sin means in a theological sense: detachment from God, as a free choice by a free moral agent. If acts are not free, then moral consequences mean nothing at all (that is true whether or not God exists, though the question of moral foundations is a difficult challenge if God does not exist).

It makes perfect sense to me that a person who has freely chosen to reject God's grace should receive a punishment for doing so. Conversely, it makes sense for a merciful God to offer forgiveness through the sacrament of reconciliation to those who choose to accept it.

Thankfully, you are right that people are indeed free to draw their own opinions. We always have been. The Old Testament is notoriously filled with examples of God's own chosen people making covenants with him, and then deciding to completely ignore the commandments given to them as a condition of the covenant (even when they have, in these accounts, been direct recipients of revelations and have no reason to doubt God's existence and authority; even Moses does not get to the Promised Land). People being free to make their own decisions is not new, but if God does exist and has revealed certain things about salvation, then some choices are objectively wrong whether we like it or not. If God does not exist, then it is quite a significant liberation from moral constraints, as Nietzsche pointed out, though few have tried to challenge the social and ethical implications as seriously as that great philosopher.
I understand in what you write but still for modern people it should just not be this way. Now what I say is interpreted by religious people, or my religious friends, as oversimplification, but I stand by that religious people overthink this way too much.

For me it starts with that all written things about religion, be it the holey books or documents are not god given, they are written by humans. Religious people who believe that some texts are divine I have a harder time debatting with. So all these things we know about God are people trying to figure it out. Be it good or bad. That's why I believe that things like ''born with sin'', ''purgatory'', ''indulges'' are human made things solely to control people into doing what they want.

For me it would be easy if I believed. I've live my life never taking anything for granted what other people say. So I would ask myself: Does my god love me? Yes, I know I'm a good person. So I've noting to fear. This of course with the liverty of living in the day that I do.

I will never come closer to religious people on this part of religion.
 

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Truly astonishing survey results.

There would have been a time when we atheists would have been hunted down and burned alive.

I'm very happy that humanity finally comes to its senses and turns away from religion. It has done more than enough harm.

PS. How on earth can OP group worshipping the Flying Spaghetti Monster with Scientology, Satanism and other cults? He clearly did not understand the concept behind it.

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