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Sorry I thought you meant being a Jew in Israel. Yeah I can see that. Well for all the non-love between Jews and Muslims, that's one thing you have in common with each other. And it's also one of the reasons I could/would never do it. (no disrespect here)
Being a jew in israel is not hard, you feel pretty safe and can practice your faith or walk with a star of David on ur neck without a problem


We have a lot in common, well all 3 faith does its pretty clear.

I have no idea how hard/easy is to be a Muslim


One thing i love about it is the connection and the fact i know Im never alone
 

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I want to add another question

How do other religious see moses?

In jewdisem he is very important, equals to abraham's status and closeness to god
That's a great question.

Well for Christians, we view Moses as the person who introduced the law, and also his spokesperson to release the Israelites from their enslavement in Egypt. The stature of Moses is inherent in the powerful signs as wonders God did through him, and also for the fact that Moses knew God so intimately.

"Since then, no prophet has risen in Israel like Moses, whom the Lord knew face to face, 11 who did all those signs and wonders the Lord sent him to do in Egypt—to Pharaoh and to all his officials and to his whole land. For no one has ever shown the mighty power or performed the awesome deeds that Moses did in the sight of all Israel." Deuteronomy 34:10-12

Jesus clarified many of the things that Moses taught regarding the law. For example, he explained that divorce was only allowed as a concession but it wasn't supposed to be this way. This is to say that the Law stands because of the fact we are sinners. If Israel perfectly represented God's holiness, then the Law would not be required.

 
3 Some Pharisees came to him to test him. They asked, “Is it lawful for a man to divorce his wife for any and every reason?”

4 “Haven’t you read,” he replied, “that at the beginning the Creator ‘made them male and female,' 5 and said, ‘For this reason a man will leave his father and mother and be united to his wife, and the two will become one flesh’? 6 So they are no longer two, but one flesh. Therefore what God has joined together, let no one separate.”

7 “Why then,” they asked, “did Moses command that a man give his wife a certificate of divorce and send her away?”

8 Jesus replied, “Moses permitted you to divorce your wives because your hearts were hard. But it was not this way from the beginning. 9 I tell you that anyone who divorces his wife, except for sexual immorality, and marries another woman commits adultery.”


Jesus also said he came to fulfil the Law and the Prophets, not abolish it (Matthew 5:17). This means he came to do the purpose of the Law in obeying it perfectly. The Pharisees often criticized Jesus regarding things like miraculous healing on the Sabbath but Jesus explains that love for God and fellow human is paramount. "who if their ox or child fell into a ditch would fail to retrieve it on the Sabbath?" We also believe Jesus fulfils all the promises that God made through the Prophets.

In fact, in the New Testament there is an interesting event called the Transfiguration recorded in Matthew 17 and Mark 9 where Jesus meets Elijah and Moses in spirit.

 
After six days Jesus took Peter, James and John with him and led them up a high mountain, where they were all alone. There he was transfigured before them. 3 His clothes became dazzling white, whiter than anyone in the world could bleach them. 4 And there appeared before them Elijah and Moses, who were talking with Jesus.

5 Peter said to Jesus, “Rabbi, it is good for us to be here. Let us put up three shelters—one for you, one for Moses and one for Elijah.” 6 (He did not know what to say, they were so frightened.)

7 Then a cloud appeared and covered them, and a voice came from the cloud: “This is my Son, whom I love. Listen to him!”

8 Suddenly, when they looked around, they no longer saw anyone with them except Jesus.

9 As they were coming down the mountain, Jesus gave them orders not to tell anyone what they had seen until the Son of Man had risen from the dead. 10 They kept the matter to themselves, discussing what “rising from the dead” meant.


It doesn't say what they talked about but my assumption is they were talking about the fulfilment of the Law (represented by Moses) and the Prophets (represented by Elijah). The voice from the heavens announces Jesus as God's son and loved by God, and instructs everyone to listen to him. Thus Jesus is the sign Moses and Elijah's (collectively Law and the Prophets) work would be completed.

After Jesus' death and resurrection, the position of Mosaic Law is clarified. It was supposed to be a schoolmaster or an instructor to the Israelites so that they might know God's character and how they must live. But the inherent demands of the law was too great for any man to fulfil in themselves. This is why the sacrifice was implemented to atone for sin temporarily. But as long as sacrifices needed to be made, there was always going to be a veil between God and his people, and Moses wore a veil himself. Thus the law and its requirements were there to show Israel their sin. If Israel was perfectly holy before God, there would not need to be such laws.

"Now we know that whatever the law says, it says to those who are under the law, so that every mouth may be silenced and the whole world held accountable to God. Therefore no one will be declared righteous in God’s sight by the works of the law; rather, through the law we become conscious of our sin." Romans 3:19-20

This requirement could not be met by Israel. Remember what happened 40 days after God introduces the law to them in voice on Mt. Sinai, they asked Aaron to build themselves a golden calf and worshipped it as the 'gods' that took them out of Egypt fully knowing and seeing what God had done for them in taking them out of Egypt. They also rebelled against God when asked to go up against Canaan (Numbers 13-14). This pattern would continue in Israel's history. The Old Testament doesn't do many favours in praising Israel for obeying God's law. But God nevertheless has mercy on them and declares a new covenant where the law will be ingrained in their hearts, rather than on stone tablets which were broken.

 
“The days are coming,” declares the Lord,
“when I will make a new covenant
with the people of Israel
and with the people of Judah.
32 It will not be like the covenant
I made with their ancestors
when I took them by the hand
to lead them out of Egypt,
because they broke my covenant,
though I was a husband to[d] them,[e]”
declares the Lord.
33 “This is the covenant I will make with the people of Israel
after that time,” declares the Lord.
“I will put my law in their minds
and write it on their hearts.
I will be their God,
and they will be my people.
34 No longer will they teach their neighbor,
or say to one another, ‘Know the Lord,’
because they will all know me,
from the least of them to the greatest,”
declares the Lord.
“For I will forgive their wickedness
and will remember their sins no more.” Jeremiah 31:31-34


The relationship between Moses and the Christ is mentioned here.
"For the law was given through Moses; grace and truth came through Jesus Christ." John 1:17

Jesus fulfils the Old covenant fully and institutes a new covenant of grace and forgiveness. This covenant is important because it releases people from the demands of the law they could not obey and gives them a new covenant based on relating to God spiritually. Thus Christians do not follow the ceremonial law anymore, because Jesus fulfilled these and by doing so completed the purpose intended and was the ultimate sacrifice for sin. People are to relate to God spiritually out of love and having been forgiven, rather than through merely external observances.

Consider the prophecy in Daniel 9. This is actually great chapter to dwell on as Daniel prays to God asking for his mercy and kindness to restore them despite knowing Israel has rejected God. God's answer might be a bit surprising.

 
Seventy ‘sevens’ are decreed for your people and your holy city to finish transgression, to put an end to sin, to atone for wickedness, to bring in everlasting righteousness, to seal up vision and prophecy and to anoint the Most Holy Place.
25 “Know and understand this: From the time the word goes out to restore and rebuild Jerusalem until the Anointed One, the ruler, comes, there will be seven ‘sevens,’ and sixty-two ‘sevens.’ It will be rebuilt with streets and a trench, but in times of trouble. 26 After the sixty-two ‘sevens,’ the Anointed One will be put to death and will have nothing The people of the ruler who will come will destroy the city and the sanctuary. The end will come like a flood: War will continue until the end, and desolations have been decreed. 27 He will confirm a covenant with many for one ‘seven.’ In the middle of the ‘seven’ he will put an end to sacrifice and offering. And at the temple he will set up an abomination that causes desolation, until the end that is decreed is poured out on him."


The interpretation varies but many scholars suggest each seven represents 7 years, so 7 sevens and 62 sevens is 69 x 7 = 483 years. In verse 25, it says the starting pt of the prophecy would be from the word to rebuild Jerusalem, the city, which is suggested to coincide with Ezra 7 and Nehemiah 2, thus 457 BC roundabouts. This is to say the appearance of the Messiah (Anointed One) would be 26/7 BC, which is when Jesus began his ministry. After that it says the Anointed One will be put to death! and afterwards the ruler to come (Rome) will destroy Jerusalem and the sanctuary (temple). Nevertheless the Messiah will confirm a covenant and put an end to sacrifice and offering in the midst of a seven (within 3.5 years of his ministry).
, when he is killed in accordance with verse 26.

This is quite an important and vivid prophecy because it mentions the Messiah specifically. The most important part of that is actually the first verse of it (v24). Seventy ‘sevens’ are decreed for your people and your holy city to finish transgression, to put an end to sin, to atone for wickedness, to bring in everlasting righteousness, to seal up vision and prophecy and to anoint the Most Holy Place. Thus the ultimate purpose of the prophecy to finish sin and transgression, to complete all prophecy and to anoint the Most Holy Place (this cannot be the physical temple because it is said to be destroyed afterwards). Daniel's prophecy says these things are to happen even while the temple and city will be destroyed by Rome. Thus God is telling Daniel that Jerusalem and the temple is to be restored BUT it is not my plan for physical restoration of Israel, but one independent of the physical. A true restoration must be spiritual and to do with ending sin.

Jesus says there would be a time when people would worship God not on a mountain and not in Jerusalem but by spirit. As much as we love buildings and religious site, I feel he makes a good point.
 
“Sir,” the woman said, “I can see that you are a prophet. 20 Our ancestors worshiped on this mountain, but you Jews claim that the place where we must worship is in Jerusalem.”

21 “Woman,” Jesus replied, “believe me, a time is coming when you will worship the Father neither on this mountain nor in Jerusalem. 22 You Samaritans worship what you do not know; we worship what we do know, for salvation is from the Jews. 23 Yet a time is coming and has now come when the true worshipers will worship the Father in the Spirit and in truth, for they are the kind of worshipers the Father seeks. 24 God is spirit, and his worshipers must worship in the Spirit and in truth.”


The Jews love their heritage knowing how much God has revealed to them and they long to be restored to former glory. But we believe the future God has for them is grander than simply Israel as a city or its temple. It is because many Jews look to purely physical restoration of their nation that they have not yet found their Messiah. Why is it that God would announce an end to sin and the sacrifice, yet also simultaneously the desolation of the city and the temple if he had planned to restore them purely physically? And why would God even allow it the city and the temple to be destroyed a second time? Didn't God say he would turn his face away from the temple if they rejected his statutes? (1 Kings 9:6-7). So the question lies: was the news concerning to Daniel, or liberating and of comfort? It's interesting to think about and one of the few prophecies that is pretty straight forward to read the thematic concerns. Even if one neglects the pure dates, it shows the purposes of God for Israel. The new temple we turn to is not physical, but found in Jesus for the Christian.
 

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You quote so much out of the Bible here. May I ask what the book means to you? Just wondering without judgement.
The Bible is a great source of comfort yet for Christians, yet also one which induces much ridicule towards Christians. Certainly, even Christians vary on how they interpret it and apply it. It is not exhaustive and doesn't cover all bases, and there are some things purely contextual meaning they may not apply today. I've never considered the Bible to be a science textbook or a list of facts. Some people hope it would be, but it's not. A lot of it is supposed to be about history but with a theological emphasis. Thus it doesn't have all the details about ancient times. But I believe it has enough to tell us what we need to know about God. It describes how God relates to the world, in particular with the people of Israel and his plans to restore and bless the world through them.

The Old Testament explains this. Unfortunately the Old Testament also shows the tension in that Israel is unable to fulfil God's laws as his model nation, and are even called a 'byword' to the other nations. There are books in the Bible devoted to airing Israel's dirty laundry. Imagine a book that basically lists the kings of your country and records how were shockingly bad they were, each one after the other. That's basically 1 and 2 Kings and 1 and 2 Chronicles in a nutshell. The rest of the Old Testament deals with God telling his people to change their ways or expect consequences through numerous prophets. They don't take heed of the warnings and are taken captive by Babylon and Assyria. However God still promises them hope that he will restore a remnant and put a new heart and spirit in them where they failed to do it themselves. That's where I believe Jesus comes in to put that into effect.

I base my faith centrally on Jesus. His teachings were quite profound and counterintuitive. But the heart of the gospel convicted me. It says that God has created everything perfect but that as humans we choose to serve our own interests and ignore him. This is what the Bible refers to as sin, and the consequences are broken relationships with God and with others around us, and eventual physical and spiritual decay. Even if we do not believe in God, we can see how destructive we can be when we fail to love others and serve our own interests. The Bible also says that if we do not deal with this, we will be separated from God forever, which is literally what hell is - a place far away from God's presence (and many people will actively choose this because they can't stand God).

Many people have tried to find a way to overcome this brokenness and void. People have created laws and spiritual guides hoping to kind the path to 'God'. Others try to be as good as they can. But the gospel says as long as we do not repair our relationship with God, this is doomed to fail. The only way to repair this is through forgiveness, which God presents in Jesus. It is difficult to explain but essentially God made the initiative to bridge the gap between God and man by coming down as a man, yet fully God so that we can know him. Jesus loving sinners is a cliched expression but is remarkably profound and transformative to those who believe in it. It says that there is hope and that God is for you no matter what. But it's also remarkably difficult to swallow because it requires the person to be humble and accept God's gift of forgiveness and the fact they need forgiveness in the first place.

Someone once described a Christian as someone who had a personal lifechanging encounter with the person Jesus. This is to say that the Christian experience is not about a set of rules to follow, or even about going to heaven, but is about a renewed relationship with Jesus and God who compels us to live a life that reflects on his love. Because Jesus trusted in the Old Testament, I also do, and use it as lessons about relating to God and his plan. I also have great trust in the New Testament, and scholars say that the number of extant manuscripts available exceeds that of Caesar's Gallic Wars and The Illiad (numbering in the several thousands). This is to say the NT has been well preserved, and the first known gospels written within 30-60 years of Jesus' death. Paul's letters to the early churches around Asia minor were dated within 15-30 years after Jesus' death. Thus the teaching of Jesus' death and resurrection was around in a time period people could verify the events. The resurrection is particularly big, because the validity of Christianity rests on it. If it never happened, Christians have been deceived big time and are to be pitied, as the apostle Paul writes. Of course science cannot answer this because it is outside of physical laws, but many historians find great circumstantial evidence to suggest it must have happened to coincide with how it was recorded, the number of witnesses, how other witnesses hostile to Christianity recorded the events, how the disciples reacted, and also how the church exploded in a very short time considering the execution of its founder. To me, this is where skeptics need to look. Did the resurrection actually happen?

There are more reasons why I trust in it which you can ask me about, but the key had to be related to me feeling in my heart that I was a sinner who rejected God and needed forgiveness and accepted God's love in Jesus. If my heart wasn't there, no matter how many miracles one sees, I could not accept Jesus or the Bible.
 

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@MWW a debate about king David. Ru up for it?
 

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Why he was so loved?
You could really ask about any person God chose, starting with Abraham. David was special to God.
David was chosen by God to be King over Israel to replace Saul, because Saul did not take heed to God's commands. Instead God would choose a 'man after his own heart' (1 Samuel 13:14). His anointing is found in 1 Samuel 16 in Bethlehem, where the prophet and judge Samuel meets David's father Jesse to appoint one of his sons King.

When they arrived, Samuel saw Eliab and thought, “Surely the Lord’s anointed stands here before the Lord.”

But the Lord said to Samuel, “Do not consider his appearance or his height, for I have rejected him. The Lord does not look at the things people look at. People look at the outward appearance, but the Lord looks at the heart.”
1 Samuel 16:6-7

In a twist, God does not select Eliab for his appearance or height. Meanwhile, recall Saul's anointing:
Kish had a son named Saul, as handsome a young man as could be found anywhere in Israel, and he was a head taller than anyone else.

God wanted to set apart a distinction between David and Saul.

David then shines in 1 Samuel 17 (fighting against the Philistines and Goliath)
David said to Saul, “Let no one lose heart on account of this Philistine; your servant will go and fight him.” Saul replied, “You are not able to go out against this Philistine and fight him; you are only a young man, and he has been a warrior from his youth.” 1 Samuel 17:32–33

You’re too young, says Saul, and this Goliath is a very experienced fighter.

Nevertheless David insists saying that as a shepherd boy he has tended to his flock and killed lions and bears to that end so Saul lets him and gives him his armor and sword. But David could not wear these because he was not used to them and so takes them off and approaches with just some stones and a sling.
Then Saul dressed David in his own tunic. He put a coat of armor on him and a bronze helmet on his head. David fastened on his sword over the tunic and tried walking around, because he was not used to them.

“I cannot go in these,” he said to Saul, “because I am not used to them.” So he took them off. Then he took his staff in his hand, chose five smooth stones from the stream, put them in the pouch of his shepherd’s bag and, with his sling in his hand, approached the Philistine. 1 Samuel 17:38–40

Goliath was very unimpressed with what he saw.

Meanwhile, the Philistine, with his shield bearer in front of him, kept coming closer to David. He looked David over and saw that he was little more than a boy, glowing with health and handsome, and he despised him. He said to David, “Am I a dog, that you come at me with sticks?” And the Philistine cursed David by his gods. “Come here,” he said, “and I’ll give your flesh to the birds and the wild animals!” 1 Samuel 17:41–44

David was not scared, rather confident.

David said to the Philistine, “You come against me with sword and spear and javelin, but I come against you in the name of the Lord Almighty, the God of the armies of Israel, whom you have defied. This day the Lord will deliver you into my hands, and I’ll strike you down and cut off your head. This very day I will give the carcasses of the Philistine army to the birds and the wild animals, and the whole world will know that there is a God in Israel. All those gathered here will know that it is not by sword or spear that the Lord saves; for the battle is the Lord’s, and he will give all of you into our hands.”

We all know what happened next in the story. With a single stone from his sling, David struck Goliath on the head and Goliath fell, and incapacitated, is killed with his own sword by David. The Philistines all flee but are struck down by Israel. How did this seemingly scrawny little kid with no military expertise, without armor or prized weapon, deliver Israel so boldly and confidently from this ordeal when the whole of Israel could only cower in sight of Goliath?

Because of the last statement: “All those gathered here will know that it is not by sword or spear that the Lord saves; for the battle is the Lord’s, and he will give all of you into our hands.” David’s confidence did not come from himself, nor from those around him. The rest of Israel were not confident because they relied on their own abilities which they considered inferior a match to Goliath. Saul, his brothers and Goliath could not really have foreseen what would happen when David stepped up to face the giant. Saul probably let him go considering defeat anyway. Instead, David’s confidence came from God, knowing that God can use anything, even the weakest and despised of things to bring about great deeds, and in turn bring great glory to God.

The rest of 1 Samuel shows perhaps surprising loyalty of David towards Saul in spite of Saul's jealousy towards him, and his intent to kill David. David still respected and revered Saul as God's anointed one and served him honorably his whole life, even to his death. Even when Saul's family was warring against him, he agreed to a term of peace which his commander Joab broke by killing Abner.

After establishing unity between the tribes of Israel, David intends to build a house for God. Nevertheless God tells David that he will build a dynastic house for David, and one his offspring would build a house for God (temple) and David's kingdom would endure forever.

“‘The Lord declares to you that the Lord himself will establish a house for you: When your days are over and you rest with your ancestors, I will raise up your offspring to succeed you, your own flesh and blood, and I will establish his kingdom. He is the one who will build a house for my Name, and I will establish the throne of his kingdom forever. I will be his father, and he will be my son. When he does wrong, I will punish him with a rod wielded by men, with floggings inflicted by human hands. But my love will never be taken away from him, as I took it away from Saul, whom I removed from before you. Your house and your kingdom will endure forever before me; your throne will be established forever.’” 2 Samuel 7:11-16

The last few verses in this Davidic promise indicate that God's love would surpass and overcome David's own shortcomings, one of which was his adultery with Bathsheba and the murder of her husband, Uriah the Hittite. David duly felt the impact of his terrible mistake on his own house, God made an irrevocable promise for his name's sake.

Christians summarise David as one after God's heart, who would fulfill God's will to bring about an even greater kingdom where that love would be fully realised.

"And when he had removed him, he raised up unto them David to be their king; to whom also he gave their testimony, and said, I have found David the son of Jesse, a man after mine own heart, which shall fulfil all my will. Of this man's seed hath God according to his promise raised unto Israel a Saviour, Jesus" (Acts 13:22)
 

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Why do you think he was ao special and loved? U forgot that part
 

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Why do you think he was ao special and loved? U forgot that part
You ask a very difficult question.

I think the best way to really put it is that God had chosen David ahead of time in his foreknowledge, and intended to bless his house just as he did with Abraham, on the premise that David would serve God by faith. The Old Testament records David as a man of great faith who held steadfast to love of God and fellow man, though not with flaws. God chose him and many others not necessarily because of their greatness, but because of his love and mercy. God's only condition as it was to Abraham was to trust that he would bring those blessings to fruition.

"Abram believed the LORD, and he credited it to him as righteousness." Genesis 15:6

We are reminded this greatly:

“The scepter shall not depart from Judah, nor the ruler’s staff from between his feet, until tribute comes to him; and to him shall be the obedience of the peoples” Genesis 49:8-12

"It is not because of your righteousness or your integrity that you are going in to take possession of their land; but on account of the wickedness of these nations, the LORD your God will drive them out before you, to accomplish what he swore to your fathers, to Abraham, Isaac and Jacob." Deuteronomy 9:5

When I was reading through Jacob's blessings to his sons, I couldn't help but wonder why Judah of all the brothers was given this distinction. The story of Judah and Tamar left quite a sour mark, and he had been one of the company of brothers to send Joseph away to Egypt. Nevertheless it is Judah who God chooses for his purposes. King David and his royal line would arise from the line of Judah. God also tells the Israelites that he chose them not because of their own righteousness but because he needed to accomplish his justice, and uphold his promise to their forefathers. David was chosen to accomplish and extend God's promise of blessing to the world, because of his great mercy.
 

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@Punky

I'm curious. Do you feel the Bible (or just language) in Hebrew has some additional insight and meaning than in other translations? I've been doing some reading and there is hidden meaning of some words which are apparent when explained in the Hebrew which amazes me. In fact, I even feel the Bible tells its own message through simple word/letter patterns.

For starters, did you know the first word in the Hebrew Tanakh is an enlarged "bet"? Why do you think this is?
 

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@Punky

I'm curious. Do you feel the Bible (or just language) in Hebrew has some additional insight and meaning than in other translations? I've been doing some reading and there is hidden meaning of some words which are apparent when explained in the Hebrew which amazes me. In fact, I even feel the Bible tells its own message through simple word/letter patterns.

For starters, did you know the first word in the Hebrew Tanakh is an enlarged "bet"? Why do you think this is?

@MWW sorry it took me time, its passover in here so when its holiday i make the most of it

i will start with your second question, why the letter "bet"- ב got the honor of starting the bible? well theres a few ideas

1-The letter B - ב is closed on all sides except one side. It teaches us a lifetime lesson: never look up, not look down, not to the side. But continue straight, continue to go- that is, look ahead

2- The letter B symbolizes 2: to inform you that there are two worlds: this world, and the next world

there are other options but bc you dont know hebrew its very hard to explain


about ur first question, absolutely yes. i think ppl who cant read the bible in hebrew miss 20% of it, its not the same, but some things are lost in translation.
ever thought about learning hebrew?

let me show u something, the bible start with "At the first God made the heaven and the earth."

בְּרֵאשִׁית בָּרָא אֱלֹהִים אֵת הַשָּׁמַיִם וְאֵת הָאָרֶץ

בְּרֵאשִׁית - At the first
בָּרָא - made
אֱלֹהִים - god
את - the




now thats lost in translation, bc את is two things, its the first letter in hebrew the letter alef א and the last letter in hebrew taf ת. so at first god mad the hebrew letters, from א until ת. AND then the heaven and earth

plus in hebrew its mad god but in english is god made

you couldnt know that if you didnt know hebrew or read the bible in his hebrew version.
 

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Discussion Starter #292 (Edited)
@MWW sorry it took me time, its passover in here so when its holiday i make the most of it

i will start with your second question, why the letter "bet"- ב got the honor of starting the bible? well theres a few ideas

1-The letter B - ב is closed on all sides except one side. It teaches us a lifetime lesson: never look up, not look down, not to the side. But continue straight, continue to go- that is, look ahead

2- The letter B symbolizes 2: to inform you that there are two worlds: this world, and the next world

there are other options but bc you dont know hebrew its very hard to explain
Happy Pesach! May God bless you and turn his face towards you and give you peace! As he redeemed the people from bondage and took them to be a spiritual house, may he present physical and spiritual freedom to you and your people, and extend that peace to all people. Incidentally, Pesach always occurs very close to Christian Easter because Nisan 14 was the day Jesus was crucified so in keeping with custom we keep it very close with the original eve of Passover. It too has great significance for us.

Indeed I notice the way the letter ב does close off heaven and earth and points R to L, which is how Hebrew is read. I've also read each letter has a symbolic meaning attached to it that comes from very early Hebrew. ב represents a house or a tent. It could be said they deliberately enlarge this ב in Genesis 1:1 in order to show that God started by building a big house for us to live with him. That's the story of creation, but I also think it's the story of the 'end'. The homes we live in right now physically, and even our souls occupy temporary bodies, but God wishes all of us to live in his house that he is building up for eternity.

How lovely is your dwelling place,
Lord Almighty!
My soul yearns, even faints,
for the courts of the Lord;
my heart and my flesh cry out
for the living God.
Even the sparrow has found a home,
and the swallow a nest for herself,
where she may have her young—
a place near your altar,
Lord Almighty, my King and my God.
Blessed are those who dwell in your house;
they are ever praising you.

Better is one day in your courts
than a thousand elsewhere

Psalm 84:1-4, 10


about ur first question, absolutely yes. i think ppl who cant read the bible in hebrew miss 20% of it, its not the same, but some things are lost in translation.
ever thought about learning hebrew?

let me show u something, the bible start with "At the first God made the heaven and the earth."

בְּרֵאשִׁית בָּרָא אֱלֹהִים אֵת הַשָּׁמַיִם וְאֵת הָאָרֶץ

בְּרֵאשִׁית - At the first
בָּרָא - made
אֱלֹהִים - god
את - the




now thats lost in translation, bc את is two things, its the first letter in hebrew the letter alef א and the last letter in hebrew taf ת. so at first god mad the hebrew letters, from א until ת. AND then the heaven and earth

plus in hebrew its mad god but in english is god made

you couldnt know that if you didnt know hebrew or read the bible in his hebrew version.
ה is a prefix for "the" right? ...et ha'aretz v'et ha'shamayim.

Is the את actually required given it is untranslatable. Does removing this change the meaning?
I heard many Jewish scholars say you do need the את and cannot take it out. So it seems to play out like this: In the beginning of creating, God aleph-taf the heavens and aleph-taf the earth.

But it does not surprise me it would be written this way, God needed the word before he created anything else, because he spoke the universe into existence. He had to have thought with him and communication and it is inscribed into creation. The word את - first and last being everything needed for us to meaningfully love and relate to each other. Without language and communication we are dead.
 

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I just caught up with this thread. I am a practicing Sunni Muslim. I try to stay on the "middle way" as much as possible and avoid any "holier than thou" practices and schools of thought. I like reading and finding connections between Abrahamic religions, academic discussion, but I do not like "who is right" debates. For me, being a man of science of sorts, the complexity and autonomy of our own molecular and cellular structure and even more, the function and fragile balances between certain elements is what convinced me, among other things, there has to be an intelligent creator, a mastermind whose genius is beyond my comprehension, that is not anthropomorphic entity, but rather something entirely different from all I can possible conjure in my mind.
 

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I just caught up with this thread. I am a practicing Sunni Muslim. I try to stay on the "middle way" as much as possible and avoid any "holier than thou" practices and schools of thought. I like reading and finding connections between Abrahamic religions, academic discussion, but I do not like "who is right" debates. For me, being a man of science of sorts, the complexity and autonomy of our own molecular and cellular structure and even more, the function and fragile balances between certain elements is what convinced me, among other things, there has to be an intelligent creator, a mastermind whose genius is beyond my comprehension, that is not anthropomorphic entity, but rather something entirely different from all I can possible conjure in my mind.
would love to read ur thought as a sunni muslim
 

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Well...for the sake of peace, much of "religious" terrorism today is actually extreme far-right wing terrorism, there is resemblance in acts and manifests on each side (religion-wise, while they are basically same side) which is obvious indoctrination by militant interpretations of one's faith in the most rigid form possible, far from practices of prophets and pious people. When those things happen, we shouldn't point fingers at each other, rather stand against far-right terrorism as one. We have much more in common, and our differences could be very easily overcome, as was the case in some past communities where they'd let every community have their own rulings withing themselves, and the state ruling for inter-community issues.
 
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Atheist here, but i don't mind if u believe in "something bigger out here" as long u don't try to shove your ideas down everyone else throats. Buy your candles and pray to anyone u think is hearing, but respect others.

However, i am aware that there are things like math, music that suggest there must be something(things) bigger out there, but the way hummanity handles this has been mostly a mess.
 
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Well...for the sake of peace, much of "religious" terrorism today is actually extreme far-right wing terrorism, there is resemblance in acts and manifests on each side (religion-wise, while they are basically same side) which is obvious indoctrination by militant interpretations of one's faith in the most rigid form possible, far from practices of prophets and pious people. When those things happen, we shouldn't point fingers at each other, rather stand against far-right terrorism as one. We have much more in common, and our differences could be very easily overcome, as was the case in some past communities where they'd let every community have their own rulings withing themselves, and the state ruling for inter-community issues.
Define "far right" and please explain how much of the religious terrorism out there is "far right".
 

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I belong to the Christian civilization, in that sense Im deeply Christian and Roman Catholic. Unfortunately Im agnostic, that is faithless, the worst of all places.
 
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