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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I thought I would create an thread for Noah Rubin. Noah is eighteen yr old & is one of the current rising stars player coming out of USA, He was Born February 21 1996, he started playing tennis at the age 1 & is currently ranked 503 in Juniors, but been as high as 6 in the Junior Rankings








Biography

Name: Noah Rubin
Born: February 21, 1996 (19 years old)
Birth Place: USA (New York)
Right handed: (Double Handed Backhand)
Train: John McEnroe Tennis Academy
Coach: Eric Rubin & Lawrence Kleger
Favourite Players: David Ferrer, Lleyton Hewitt & Andy Roddick
Age Started Tennis: 1
Favorite Surface: Hard court & Indoor Hardcourt
Career High ATP Ranking: 194
Career High ITF Junior Ranking: 6

Titles Won & Achievements

2004 12&U Long Island Regional Chmps
2005 12&U L2R Long Island Wilson Regional Chmps
2005 12&U L2R Long Island Wilson Regional Chmps
2005 12&U L1 Level 1 Chmps
2005 12&U L1 Thanksgiving Classic
2006 12&U +L1 Eastern Designated Closed Chmps
2006 12&U +L1 Eastern Designated Closed Winter CHMPS
2006 12&U +L1 Eastern Designated Closed CHMPS
2007 12&U USTA National Selection Tournament
2008 14&U +L1 Eastern Designated Closed CHPS
2009 14&U +L1 Eastern Designated Closed Chmps. USTA L5 FIC
2009 16&U L1B Bill Brown & Claude Cargill Spring Challenger
2009 16&U L1 Point Set Hard Court Championships
2009 14&U USTA National Open
2009 14&U USTA National Open
2010 16&U The Labor Day Championships
2010 16&U +L1 Point Set Eastern Designated Closed Chmps
2011 16&U USTA International Spring Championships
2011 18&U USTA National Selection Tournament
2012 18&U Coffee Bowl (Copa del Cafe) G1
2012 18&U Pan American ITF Championships GB1
2014 18&U The Wimbledon Junior Championships GA
2014 18&U USTA Boys' National Championships.
2015 CH Charlottesville Challenger

Double

2006 12&U +L1 Eastern Designated Closed CHMPS
2007 14&U +L1 Eastern Designated Closed Chmps
2009 14&U USTA National Open
2014 18&U USTA Boys' National Championships
 

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Discussion Starter #2
Into the junior Wimbledon finals, his first junior slam final hoping he can win. Plays Stefan Kozlov in the finals

SF: Noah RUBIN (USA) (Q) d. Taylor Harry FRITZ (USA) 6-4 6-2
 

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Discussion Starter #4

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If he is dead set on playing a year of college tennis IMO he should pick Virginia. More proven coaching and better players to practice against on a daily basis.
 

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If he is dead set on playing a year of college tennis IMO he should pick Virginia. More proven coaching and better players to practice against on a daily basis.
I think his parents want him to go to a private school (given their background/political affiliations). If he goes to UVA, will he be in line-up given the depth. That is a factor as well. He will probably be the No.1 singles player if he goes to WF and likely get a wildcard into the Winston-Salem Open.
 

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I think his parents want him to go to a private school (given their background/political affiliations). If he goes to UVA, will he be in line-up given the depth. That is a factor as well. He will probably be the No.1 singles player if he goes to WF and likely get a wildcard into the Winston-Salem Open.
I don't see a single player on UVA's roster of returning players who is even arguably as good as him. Should be one singles from day one at either school.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the Video & Pictures Saplee ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Rockville Centre's Noah Rubin wins Wimbledon boys single title




Noah Rubin of Rockville Centre won the Wimbledon boys singles title Sunday, the first marquee victory of his career, when he defeated fellow American and longtime friend Stefan Kozlov, 6-4, 4-6, 6-3.
Rubin, 18, was unseeded and had to earn his way into the tournament through qualification. It took him eight matches to claim the championship, but he said that from the outset he believed he could win.
"Nothing said I couldn't be here," said Rubin, who embraced his tearful father, Eric, after the victory. "I believe in my competitiveness, my mental capability and my speed. I don't see why not . . . But I wasn't thinking about this at all. First-round qualies, playing a big server that day, I was thinking I could lose the first round of qualifying. It was just point by point, match by match. Eight matches later, this is where I am."
This was the first all American final at Wimbledon since 1977 (Van Winnitsky defeated Eliot Teltscher), and there were three Americans in the final three. Rubin defeated another American, Harry Taylor Fritz, in the semifinals. Rubin trains at the John McEnroe Academy at Sportime on Randalls Island, where he is coached by Lawrence Kleger. The last American boys winner was Donald Young in 2007.
"We couldn't be happier for Noah, and we are incredibly proud of him," said Patrick McEnroe, the United States Tennis Association's general manager for player development. "To have an all American boys final and three of the four semifinalists be American, as well, is a testament to the dedication and hard work put in by themselves, their coaches and their families."
This was only the second junior event that Rubin had played this year. He has played mostly on the challenger and futures circuits and was ranked No. 539 in the world.
The match was played on Wimbledon's expansive No. 1 court before a large and enthusiastic crowd that seemed to side with Rubin. "I didn't expect the court to be that packed," Rubin said. "I actually thought nobody was going to come out to the match, but that was not the case. They were very enthusiastic to be out there. Kind of got the crowd to be into it a little bit. Just the atmosphere was unbelievable . . . It was almost surreal, but hopefully, [the impact of the victory] will kick in in the next couple of days."
It was an even-handed match with Rubin, at 5-9 and a bit more than 150 pounds not the most physically imposing of players. Kozlov, 16, of Pembroke Pines, Florida, is a bit bigger, but his physical style couldn't overcome Rubin. Rubin's forehand was solid, his serve effective, his speed crucial and his competitive drive a determining factor.
"I didn't expect much coming into these tournaments," Rubin said. "I just wanted to get out there and enjoy myself. It's one of my final junior tournaments, so it's nice to have this under my belt. I'll always remember this time."
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Noah Rubin Downs Kozlov to Claim Wimbledon Boys Title


Any unseeded qualifier capturing a Wimbledon title is bound to be cast in the role of underdog, but 18-year-old Noah Rubin's 6-4, 4-6, 6-3 win Sunday afternoon over fellow American Stefan Kozlov could hardly be called an upset.

Once No. 6 in the ITF junior world rankings, Rubin devoted most of 2014 to ITF Men's Circuit events, but with his ATP ranking currently 539, the New Yorker was able to get into qualifying of the French and Wimbledon junior championships in his final year of eligibility. Although he was careful to say he knew there was a chance he'd lose in qualifying, he was not buying the Cinderella story.

"Nothing said I couldn't be here," said Rubin, who had lost in the first round in his previous two Wimbledon junior championships. "I believe in my competitiveness, my mental capability, and speed. I don't see why not."

Kozlov was the one with the experience in a junior slam final, having played on Rod Laver in the boys championship match at the Australian Open in January, but even he was awed by the atmosphere on Court 1, which was approximately two-thirds full with thousands of ticket-buying fans applauding every winner.

"When I played on Rod Laver it was really quiet," Kozlov said of his experience in Melbourne. "I don't know why, I don't think anyone was into the match, I mean it was 3 and love. It was not even half way filled. Today was an unbelievable atmosphere, one of the best I've ever played."

Rubin agreed.

"I didn't expect it to be that packed," admitted Rubin, who said he wasn't distracted by the cheering crowds watching the men's final on the big screen on the famous hill just outside. "I actually thought nobody was going to come out to the match, but that was not the case. They were all very enthusiastic to be out there. I kind of got the crowd into it a little bit. Just the atmosphere was unbelievable."

Fans didn't side with either player, but after Rubin won the first set, breaking Kozlov for the second time in the set in the fifth game and holding the rest of the way, they were actively supporting Kozlov's push to take the second set. Rubin went up a break 3-2 in the second set on a dazzling backhand cross court pass, but Kozlov broke right back, taking advantage of two unforced errors by Rubin.

With Rubin serving at 4-5 in the second set, he played one of his worst games of the match, with Kozlov just required to stay in the point long enough for Rubin to make an error. After maintaining laser-like focus in his quarterfinal and semifinal matches against the big serving Tim van Rijthoven of the Netherlands and Taylor Fritz of the US, Rubin wasn't as sharp against Kozlov, who averaged 102 mph on his first serve.

But Rubin's maturity showed in the final set, especially when he failed to convert two break points with Kozlov serving at 3-3, 15-40. Rubin made two errors on those break points, but when he got a third, he yelled "let's go, right here, come on," urging the crowd to get behind him. When Kozlov sent a forehand long on the next point, Rubin got his wish, and Kozlov sensed his opportunity was gone.

"I kind of choked at 3-all in the third," said Kozlov. "I gave away a service game which I should have won, and that was it. After that, the match was over. Down 15-40, I played two good points, and got a little bit relieved, and then I shanked a forehand, when I should have hit a winner. Then, on the next point, I played carelessly."

Two hours into the match, Rubin held for 5-3 and was bouncing up and down on the baseline as Kozlov served to stay in the match. He missed a drop shot to start the game, won the second point with a good first serve, but Rubin snuck in for a rare forehand volley winner to make it 15-30. A long rally on the next point ended with a forehand winner by Rubin, giving him two match points. He missed a forehand long on the first one, but Kozlov gave him the second one, netting a routine backhand. Rubin didn't celebrate wildly, but he did go over to hug his father Eric in the stands before the trophy presentation.

The champion's lap with the trophy is a Wimbledon tradition, but Rubin wasn't quite sure what to do.

"We were both a little confused about that," Rubin said. "I didn't know if that was a tradition or not. I didn't want to break any traditions here, so I just followed their rules."

But Rubin invited Kozlov, a friend and occasional roommate, to join him.

"They told me to go. I was like, Stefan let's go, let's do it together," Rubin said. "I thought it was interesting, but it was good."

Kozlov then gave Rubin the American flag Kozlov's father had put in his bag before the match, and they joined in displaying it and posing for photographs with it.

"Stefan brought the flag. He said, 'I have a flag, I have a flag.'", Rubin said. "I was like, dig it out. It's been a long time since an all-American final, so might as well support."

Rubin is the first American to win the Wimbledon boys singles title since Donald Young in 2007. He believes the young US boys, seven of whom reached the round of 16 and three the semifinals, could give the country hope for a new set of stars.

"At the end when we were holding the American flag, I was like, this is pretty special," said Rubin. Hopefully we'll keep rising together and none of us will fall off, and we'll, as a group, get to the top and show the results American wants."

Rubin said his title at Wimbledon does not change his plan to attend college for a one year, at either Wake Forest or Virginia, with that decision to be made in the next few weeks. He will play the Godfrey Illinois Futures, then Kalamazoo, with a week off to rest and recover from his eight wins in the past ten days.
 

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Has Coach Boland ever started a Freshman at No.1?
I don't think so. Even when Mitchell Frank came in and was tearing it up and got to #1 in the ITA singles rankings he still played #3 behind Jenkins and Domijan.

Boland also rarely plays one player at #1 all year especially when the talent is so close. He often rotated Frank and Domijan around. He will probably play Rubin at #1 some matches and then move him around to 2 or 3 for some matches. At Wake he would be #1 every match and Wake plays a comparable schedule to Virginia. Practice would be a big factor for Virginia though.
 

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Discussion Starter #17

WIMBLEDON

July 6, 2014

Noah Rubin

LONDON, ENGLAND

N. RUBIN/S. Kozlov
6/4, 4/6, 6/3


THE MODERATOR: Questions, please.

Q. How does it sound, Wimbledon champion?
NOAH RUBIN: It's great to be here in front of you all. It was almost surreal, but hopefully it will kick in in the next couple of days. Right now I just don't want to cramp in front of you guys (smiling).

Q. Went three sets. It was a tough one.
NOAH RUBIN: Yeah, I had my opportunities in the second. Got the early break. But Stefan is obviously a very good competer, very good player, everybody knows of him.
I just had to keep focused and keep it going. Kind of laid off the gas a little bit. Thank God got it back into a third and got the mid‑set break and kept holding and holding, so it was good.

Q. What was your impression of playing on Court1?
NOAH RUBIN: Didn't expect it to be that packed. I actually thought nobody was going to come out to the match, but that was not the case. They were all very enthusiastic to be out there.
Kind of got the crowd into it a little bit. Just the atmosphere was unbelievable.

Q. You know they sell tickets for that match.
NOAH RUBIN: Really? People paid to watch me? Interesting (smiling).

Q. When you came in here ‑ we talked earlier in the week; you were a qualifier ‑ did you ever think in your wildest dreams you could be sitting here as junior Wimbledon champion?
NOAH RUBIN: Yeah, I mean, nothing said I couldn't be here. I believe in my competitiveness, my mental capability, and speed. I don't see why not.
But I wasn't thinking ahead to this. I wasn't at all. First‑round quallies, playing a big server that day, I was thinking I could possibly lose the first round of qualifying.
It was just point by point, match by match. Eight matches later, this is where I am.

Q. You haven't had much luck on the grass the last few times you tried it. This year, just experience?
NOAH RUBIN: The first year was a tough year. It wasn't the best tennis I was playing. Last year I was playing a very good player in Luke Bambridge, big server, 9‑7 in the third I want to say. Anything could have happened in that match.
You know, it's persistence. It thrives sometimes. That's why we're here.

Q. What did you learn about yourself this week?
NOAH RUBIN: Just believe in yourself and get out there and never give up. I don't know. Believe that I could basically do anything I want if I really put my mind to it. Truly believe that every time I step on the court that I'm going to win that match, so...

Q. Did you at all learn maybe that you shouldn't rush yourself? You thought you were going to go away totally from the juniors last year. Now you came back and look at the surprise you have.
NOAH RUBIN: It is a great feeling to be out here winning the tournament, but this doesn't change anything. This doesn't say I made the right decision.
I had a great tournament and that's why I'm here. But if I didn't win this tournament, let's say I played futures, maybe that was the right path to take. So who knows what could have happened.

Q. Why are you so hesitant to say this was a good move? Seems like it was.
NOAH RUBIN: It's a great tournament. I can't say anything. I played well. But, I mean, who knows what could have happened if I had taken any other path. You never know, so should play every match.

Q. Which one of you brought the flag?
NOAH RUBIN: Stefan brought the flag. It was as I was holding the trophy. He said, I have a flag, I have a flag. I was like, Dig it out. It's been a long time since and all‑American final, so might as well support.

Q. Did you sense the significance of that, that there were two of you guys out there?
NOAH RUBIN: At the end when we were holding the American flag, I was like, This is pretty special. Hopefully we'll keep rising together and none of us will fall off, and just we'll as a group get to the top and show the results America wants.

Q. Do you know the last time two Americans in the final?
NOAH RUBIN: 1977.

Q. How hard was it for you to play against a close friend of yours?
NOAH RUBIN: I mean, we don't really play too often. I guess you could ask Federer and Djokovic about that, I'm sure. They play each other much more often.
We know each other for so long now. We both wanted it. Nothing changed by that. We're not going to be all in each other's faces at all or stuff like that.
I don't see any difference. We just know each other well. At the end, just a couple hugs and we're all better.

Q. You seemed to switch that off pretty quickly.
NOAH RUBIN: Yeah, it's the atmosphere. You can't not let it get to you. I expect him to do it. I expect myself to do it. You see Federer and Djokovic do it. It's no difference.
But, yeah, you got to get out there. You switch it off pretty quick. I was a little surprised how quickly, but we were just both exhausted. It's been a long week, and it was nice to see him be civil at the end and have him there.

Q. How many towels are you leaving with?
NOAH RUBIN: Eight. It's got to be eight. The rain delay, then two today. Somewhere around there. A couple family members.

Q. You seemed reluctant to do the victory lap.
NOAH RUBIN: We were both a little confused like that. I didn't know if that was a tradition or not. I didn't want to break any traditions here, so I just followed their rules.

Q. Did you invite him to come with you?
NOAH RUBIN: Yeah, they told me to go. I was like, Stefan, let's go. Let's do it together. I thought it was interesting, but it was good.

Q. 3‑All, you were trying to get the crowd behind you.
NOAH RUBIN: Love‑30, something like that, and they started clapping a little bit. I got little excited. Nothing against Stefan at all. I just felt the crowd at that moment.
You know, nothing you can do. It's a great atmosphere. So much tradition behind this tournament. Nothing you can do about it, so...

Q. Was it distracting at all when the tiebreaker in the men's match was going on? Could you hear the people outside?
NOAH RUBIN: It actually worked out pretty well. It was probably between points. Nothing crazy. In the middle of points, so nothing.

Q. The chair umpire at one point asked people to calm down, and it wasn't the people that were on Court1 that were getting all excited. That didn't enter into it?
NOAH RUBIN: No, didn't affect me. I think it worked out pretty well. The chair umpire was very good about it. Everybody was pretty good about quieting down when they needed to. I think it worked out pretty well.

Q. Who all have you called or talked to?
NOAH RUBIN: Grandparents, my coach, my girlfriend, my mom. You name it, it's been called.

Q. Who was here with you in the stands today?
NOAH RUBIN: My father. Yeah, my father. That's it. My girlfriend was here. She left on Friday after the quarterfinals, so...

Q. What's the schedule from here for the summer? Are you going to play Kalamazoo?
NOAH RUBIN: I have one future in America in Godfrey. Illinois, a little different atmosphere. And then Kalamazoo.

Q. Have you heard from any other players this week?
NOAH RUBIN: Talking about the junior players?

Q. Yes.
NOAH RUBIN: I don't know. Nothing great. Just, Good job; keep it up.
In the boys juniors, I find most of us, we're friends, so it's just cheering each other on. There's a few outliers there, but for the most part we're supporting each other.

Q. Have the seniors said anything to you?
NOAH RUBIN: Not really. No, I mean, I'm fine with it, but it would have been nice. Maybe at the dinner tonight.

Q. How about John?
NOAH RUBIN: John, I got a couple texts from him. It's good to hear from him. I mean, he is John McEnroe, so...

Q. What does the next couple weeks hold in store for you? When is the future?
NOAH RUBIN: I get home and I have a week, I want to say, then I get out there, so...
Basically take a week off and then get out there.

Q. Plans for your week off? What do you expect the reception to be back in the U.S.?
NOAH RUBIN: A hug from my parents, besides my father, grandparents. A nice dinner would be nice. See my girlfriend. Don't ask for too much here.

Q. Your two weeks here in London, how do you sum it up?
NOAH RUBIN: You know, I didn't expect much coming into these tournaments. Just wanted to get out here and enjoy myself. Haven't had the greatest results in the past, as people know.
It's one of my final junior tournaments, so it's nice to have this under my belt. I'll always remember this time. Hopefully be back in the seniors shortly, so...

Q. Who are you rooting for in the men's final?
NOAH RUBIN: Sorry, Djokovic, he's a great guy, but I do want Federer. Djokovic is an unbelievable tennis player, but it would be really nice to see Federer take this one.

Q. As you say, you didn't do so well in the other tournaments. What do you credit this year being so successful?
NOAH RUBIN: I mean, I want to say experience. I've just been out here for so long now. Besides the Australian, it's been my third year at all the slams. I think I know what it takes just on and off the court to be professional and take care of business and do what I need to do to give myself the best chance to win, so...

Q. You played eight matches. Have you done anything that like qualifies as London?
NOAH RUBIN: Oh, actually have not had time for that. I see my girlfriend posting pictures of London. Have you been anywhere? No, I've just been trying to do my best at the tournament.
I have the past couple years. Changing of the guards and Big Ben, all the usual things that makes London London.

Q. Does this change any future plans?
NOAH RUBIN: Absolutely nothing. Just a smile on my face.

Q. Do you leave the trophy at home or take it off to college with you?
NOAH RUBIN: I think I'm going to leave it at home. I don't trust those college kids up there.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Wimbledon Junior Recap; Rubin Chooses Wake Forest​

Due to the restrictions imposed on print/online media credentialed at Wimbledon, which does not allow them to photograph play, I won't be producing a slideshow or videos from this year's junior tournament. But my recap, which focuses on the boys final featuring Noah Rubin and Stefan Kozlov, is available today at the Tennis Recruiting Network. (If you have access to WatchESPN, a replay of the boys final is available).

Rubin, who was honored by the New York Mets at last night's game, announced today that he will attend Wake Forest this fall. Wake Forest head coach Tony Bresky was at Wimbledon throughout Rubin's run to the final; the recruiting battle was between Virginia, where Bresky was an assistant for seven years under Brian Boland, and Wake Forest, where Bresky is entering his third year as head coach.

When asked at Wimbledon (prior to the final) why he had decided to attend college, this is what Rubin said:

"I've been playing pros for a while now and the thing that got my father and I thinking about college is the peak of professional tennis players. You look in the book of Wimbledon and you're seeing 29, 30 (year-old players) all over the place. It's not 18-year-olds, like Nadal, winning slams anymore. So that year of maturity, mentally or physically, I think is important."
 
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