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Good article indeed, although I wouldn't say he has powerful groundstrokes anymore.
 

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That would be the man in your avatar
But Rios was more like a middleweight taking on heavyweights. He just didn't have the physicality to do it for two weeks, seven best of fives. But then again Hewitt was about the same size and he did it in two majors and he had a winning record of dominance over Rios. Rios did get to no. 1 and won four Masters series titles.
 

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Nalbandian and Davydenko are the biggest wastes of talent that never won a slam, Gyros is not in the same stratosphere.
 

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Good article indeed, although I wouldn't say he has powerful groundstrokes anymore.
where did they go? Did he tank those away too?
 

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Kyrgios does not have limitations, he has shown he can beat anyone and everyone – when he is mentally and physically up for the task.
If you were talking about mere technical limitations, then I'd argue movement/footwork is (surely) one such. Variety is also questionable, maybe masked by the 'circus shots'. Apart from technical aspects, mental limitations (fear of failure as someone had ventured), or an inability to concentrate (ADHD?) are hampering his game/consistency.
 

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If you were talking about mere technical limitations, then I'd argue movement/footwork is (surely) one such. Variety is also questionable, maybe masked by the 'circus shots'. Apart from technical aspects, mental limitations (fear of failure as someone had ventured), or an inability to concentrate (ADHD?) are hampering his game/consistency.
Where were those footwork movement technical limitations the first matches he played Fed, Nadal and Djokovic? Surely those three would have exploited those limitations. Maybe he looks slow (or slower) now because he's lazy and tank-minded so often.
 

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Where were those footwork movement technical limitations the first matches he played Fed, Nadal and Djokovic? Surely those three would have exploited those limitations. Maybe he looks slow (or slower) now because he's lazy and tank-minded so often.
I'd need to go and watch some video of those matches to give an answer. But the lack of movement is my impression of his game in general. Also, in general beating Fed, Nadal and Djokovic doesn't mean a player had no flaws, nor does it require such a game. Just need one of those days, where you peak past their level on that given day (or they slump below yours). Obviously you need a decent level to begin with to accomplish that, and some weapons to work with. But even a more defensive minded guy like Gilles Simon (some might call him a pusher) has wins over each of those three.

edit. Just to add, the sub par movement would contribute to sub par defending. I'd say one indication/outcome from this are the occasional 'rockets' he blasts. He needs to try to finish the point even from less optimal situations, because running around goes against him. On the other hand he has the top tier (one of the best) serve to rely on on his own service games, and hoping to take the set at least in a TB. But even his serve got a bit exposed by Nishikori in Wimbledon. Lack of variety? Kept on going with the big flat serves which Kei put in play masterfully.

edit 2. Problems with movement aren't surprising though if we're talking about a guy wrestling with hip issues. Wonder if he at some point moved more effectively/effortlessly?

edit 3. Interesting reads, one on A. Zverev and one on Kyrgios. The one thing that jumps out for me is the team around them, (or in Nick's case, a lack of one) which in AZ's case seems like one of the better ones (they were talking about a 5 year plan when he was 16, i.e. that only when AZ was 21 (which he is now), should the training begin to bear fruit; look where he is now), giving him an advantage.

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/tennis/2017/07/01/family-values-fuel-next-big-thing-sascha-zverevas-rise-towards/
Project Sascha might seem to have reached fruition in Rome six weeks ago, where Zverev became the youngest man to win a Masters since Djokovic himself fully 10 years earlier. But the family, while delighted with the 1,000 rankings points and the £700,000 prize money, were far from being overwhelmed.

“It is an unbelievable result, but is a beginning, always a beginning,” explains Papa. “You don’t say it’s great. It’s finished now. You look ahead.”

According to Apey, “Nobody here is in a hurry. It’s true that every time we talk about where he might be in 18 months’ time, Sascha gets there in six. But we know that it’s one thing to reach the top 10 [which Zverev did for four weeks after Rome] and another to stay there.

“The plan started when he was 16, and we said it would take five years just to reach a starting point where Sascha is ready to deliver on his potential.
We are still a year away from that. But plenty of other young players are now copying what Sascha has been doing. He has become the blueprint for the men’s tour.”
https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/07/10/nick-kyrgios-the-reluctant-rising-star-of-tennis
Kyrgios won ten matches in slams before he won two in regular events. Off the main stage, he began to struggle with the demands of the tour. At the moment when most top players build up an entourage of coaches, physiotherapists, and trainers, Kyrgios split with one coach and then another, and struck out on his own. “Every coach I had tried to tame me, tried to make me play more disciplined, tried to make me do drills,” he told me. “All through my career, there were people trying to tell me to play a more normal style of tennis.” But, he went on, “I’ve just been kind of playing on instinct. I feel like it’s been successful, so I don’t know why there’s a good reason to stop that.”

Not having a coach meant that there was less accountability in practice. In Lyon, I watched him hit with another Aussie, Matt Reid, two days before the match against Kicker. Kyrgios did it his way. Warming up, he entertained the little crowd of kids gathered at the chain-link fence by punctuating his grunts with the names of other players (“Dominic UH Dominic UH Thiem EH-UH Jo-Willy UH Jo-Wilfried UH”). He started hitting one-handed topspin backhands, a shot I’d never seen him hit in a match. He and Reid began to play out the points. “Fucking move your legs, you shit!” Kyrgios yelled at himself. Another backhand miss: “Make it!” A few shots later, he was smiling.
Zverev & co. really represents the classic idea of "a German approach" to me. Precision. Systematic, engineering like approach.
 

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20 y.o. Safin has played 100 matches in the season'00, 73-27, finishing it as y.e. no.2, and till his 25th birthday winning 2 GS + 5 Masters + entering two more GS finals + two GS semis.

Kyrgios amasses 100 matches in two seasons combined.

So, if Kyrgios actually starts winning slams and masters as 25 y.o. the age Safin stopped winning big titles (as well as 25 y.o. Borg, Wilander, McEnroe), we could put those two in the same sentence.
 

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He is just a controversial/infamous servebot.
 

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Kyrgious is not talented, he's an overrated servebot with kinda a flashy game sometimes and that's it.

Ernests Gulbis is actually the biggest waste of talent in tennis history.
That "Kyrgios is not talented" bit doesn't hold up. More so Nick seems to be riding mostly on talent, since he's not a systematic, hard worker. If not for talent, how do you go on to win against Fed, Rafa and Djok as a youngin who's known for not being big on training...

Nick Kyrgios: talent to burn - Five short pieces about one of tennis’s most misunderstood players

He eschews structure, boredom, and the patterns and routines that form the mental counterpart of muscle memory in many tennis players. It is difficult because it has always been easy for him. “A gift and a curse,” he told the reporter Matt Dickinson in 2016. “Ever since I was young, I was always at the top of my age group. There’s probably a lot of people on tour who have to work a lot harder.” He has an impeccable serve, which he uses to cross-subsidise the strange and esoteric shots he prefers. (There is a half-baked theory that Kyrgios’s flair came from his childhood, when he developed his groundstrokes and serve so he didn’t have to run.) For a professional sportsperson, he is surprisingly unfit. These attributes and peculiarities, when combined with surety and talent, and offset with a couple of diamond studs, a rude haircut and a coloured complexion, have been received as insolence, especially in Australia.

Some Sky News commentator posting regularly on MTF?
[...] but on Sky News one sports commentator called Kyrgios a “piece of shit”.

Solid endorsement
In Brazil they talk about the difference between futebol arte and futebol de resultados – art football and results football. Nick Kyrgios plays art tennis.
Zverev = Die Mannschaft
Kyrgios = Seleção


At the 2018 Australian Open, Nick Kyrgios was telling someone in the crowd to shut up, tersely, but with no particular malice, and as he did the tension inside Melbourne Park’s Hisense Arena heightened for a moment, expectant. Perhaps this shouting would not end.

Of all his peculiarities, maybe the most distinctive is Kyrgios’s aversion to noise. This is a liability for someone whose office is a fully peopled stadium.
 

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Only he knows how hard he trains, which is really the main issue here. He'd probably be better with more on-court discipline, but that's not in any way shape or form been his problem this year- he just cannot get healthy.
 

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Nalbandian, Safin, Davydyenko all had at least satisfactory careers, no way they can be said to be wasted.

Kyrgios probably should be up there with the big Gen U players in terms of achievements, but it's not like he doesn't have limitations to his game and can slap 185 km/h forehands all match. Underachiever due to lack of focus for sure but not the next Federer.
 

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Nalbandian and Davydenko are the biggest wastes of talent that never won a slam, Gyros is not in the same stratosphere.
Davydenko? No way, his career was alright, could've done better if not for injuries, but wouldn't call him a waste of talent. I remember some tennis journo said that Denko has two gameplans, hit hard and hit harder. :lol:
 

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For me Nalbandian was one of the biggest talents that didnt develop to winning GS. Kyrgios no.
+1 and comparisons to kyrgios are quite frankly unfair. sure, david could have worked harder on his strength and conditioning but he was no clown and he had to deal with atg’s fed and nadal at the peak of their powers with no end in sight.

i think the pivotal point in nalby's gs career was the ’06 rg loss to fed in the semis. he played absolutely stunning tennis in the 1st set only to have fed up the ante in the 2nd, and eventually retiring in the 3rd due to injury..and a broken heart imo. it was a soul-destroying loss (esp considering fed was trounced by nadal 2 days later in the final) and the match where he lost all confidence and belief he would ever win a major. it was also, not coincidentally, the last time he reached the semis of a major.

Good article indeed, although I wouldn't say he has powerful groundstrokes anymore.
powerful groundstrokes, lol.
 
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