Mens Tennis Forums banner

181 - 200 of 207 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Re: New to the top 100 - 2019 [18] Hoang, Koepfer, Paul & Barrere enter

You seem to be missing the point on purpose. I never said that Ymer would always lose. Nor did I even come close to implying that. All I said is that anyone with a good attacking game should be able to beat Ymer. That is to say, anyone at or close to their peak will beat Ymer at his peak. I really don't think there's any disputing it. Ymer is a very limited player and only dangerous because he defends so well. I'll admit that his serve has improved a lot though this season compared to last.

Clearly Ymer is playing at his peak now (I don't think there's much more room for progress left for his current game style; the only option I see is to bulk up and become more aggressive); Bedene and Tsonga certainly weren't. I didn't see the other matches so I cannot comment, but I doubt Vesely was.
It's not because you write with certainty that the reasoning makes sense...

"Anyone at or close to their peak will beat Ymer at his peak" -

i) How a nobody can affirm something like this about a professional tennis player who is 21 yo and clearly rising from the Challenger tour as we have seen for various players over the past years (generally such a rise is followed by at least a couple of years in the top 70) ?

ii) Don't you think that because he actually outplays them by returning all the balls that most of the time end up being winners against some other players, they actually struggle to play at what you call their peak (which btw doesn't really mean anything in this situation as peak is rather a mid-term dynamic than a one match form) against him.

"Clearly Ymer is playing at his peak now (I don't think there's much more room for progress left for his current game style "

iii) He is playing better than he has ever had, yes. But again, what do you mean there is not much more room for progress? This is completely crap. He actually has a huge room for progress as he is going to start playing ATP tournaments regularly at least until Roland Garros.

You are completely biased by the fact that his game is not the typical aggressive one. If you reckon yourself that he has an above average defensive game that seem to be working increasingly well against various types of players, how can you not give credit to that to the same extent as an aggressive game?

Gilles Simon has been world no.6 with a very similar fashion.

Maybe you should read what Tsonga said post-Orleans, that he actually played his best match of the week but that the guy facing him was just too good. And that he will soon be top 50. But sure you probably know more about tennis than the players themselves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
By the way, judging from your comments I very much doubt whether you actually watched any of his matches. All you seem to be doing is looking at recent results and at statistics.
Hahaha... well again, you are wrong.

I follow the CH tour for 7 years now. I have watched every single match of Mikael and Elias in 2019.

Judging from this comment and the others, I have the feeling you make your opinions very fast, on a poor basis. Challenge your ideas and your arguments please, because what you are stating here clearly lacks foundation.
 

·
MONSOON season.
Joined
·
81,392 Posts
Re: New to the top 100 - 2019 [18] Hoang, Koepfer, Paul & Barrere enter

It's not because you write with certainty that the reasoning makes sense...

"Anyone at or close to their peak will beat Ymer at his peak" -

i) How a nobody can affirm something like this about a professional tennis player who is 21 yo and clearly rising from the Challenger tour as we have seen for various players over the past years (generally such a rise is followed by at least a couple of years in the top 70) ?

ii) Don't you think that because he actually outplays them by returning all the balls that most of the time end up being winners against some other players, they actually struggle to play at what you call their peak (which btw doesn't really mean anything in this situation as peak is rather a mid-term dynamic than a one match form) against him.

"Clearly Ymer is playing at his peak now (I don't think there's much more room for progress left for his current game style "

iii) He is playing better than he has ever had, yes. But again, what do you mean there is not much more room for progress? This is completely crap. He actually has a huge room for progress as he is going to start playing ATP tournaments regularly at least until Roland Garros.

You are completely biased by the fact that his game is not the typical aggressive one. If you reckon yourself that he has an above average defensive game that seem to be working increasingly well against various types of players, how can you not give credit to that to the same extent as an aggressive game?

Gilles Simon has been world no.6 with a very similar fashion.

Maybe you should read what Tsonga said post-Orleans, that he actually played his best match of the week but that the guy facing him was just too good. And that he will soon be top 50. But sure you probably know more about tennis than the players themselves.
i) This is not a point but a dumb insult that exposes your lack of arguments.

ii) No. Ymer retrieving a lot of balls does not mean that he finishes points. It increases the likelihood of players making UEs, but on good days attacking players will still hit more winners than UEs.

iii) Then tell me what you think he can improve on. Again you fail to provide an analysis of his game.

I have given full credit to Ymer. I find him terribly boring but I recognize that it is highly effective. What I said is that attacking players should be able to beat him when both are playing at their peak. When defensive players are at their peak and their attacking opponents are not, of course the former will win. Simon has indeed shown this, even against top players like Federer and Djokovic. But at the same time these players have a commanding H2H lead over Simon because even Simon couldn't outrun them.

I also do not see the same potential in Ymer. Only time will tell.

I would really appreciate it if you could respond in an honest manner to my comments. Your comments are very rude and twist my arguments on purpose. You seem to imply that I think Ymer is a basic scrub with no talent whatsoever. I never said anything remotely like this. If you cannot reason logically and civilly, I am done here.
 

·
MONSOON season.
Joined
·
81,392 Posts
Hahaha... well again, you are wrong.

I follow the CH tour for 7 years now. I have watched every single match of Mikael and Elias in 2019.

Judging from this comment and the others, I have the feeling you make your opinions very fast, on a poor basis. Challenge your ideas and your arguments please, because what you are stating here clearly lacks foundation.
OK. It's impressive that you have watched so many of his matches yet failed to describe any part of his game in all of your posts, apart from the basic classification of Ymer as a defensive player.

I first saw Ymer in a Dutch Challenger two years ago. He was very bad (lost to Krawietz, an attacking player still making plenty of UEs). I have seen quite a few of his matches since and I see improvement in his serve and in his own UE count. Other than that he remains to me a very limited player. I watched him again live this year against Julian Lenz in Bordeaux. Another very bad match. He was, again, terrible in doubles in Bordeaux as well. After that I only saw the final against Pouille (on the stream) and he was completely outplayed. What I saw of him in Orléans was much better, but I doubt that he can play much better than he did there.

This wasn't a hastily made judgment of his game without any basis. I have seen him plenty of times and have only seldom been impressed. And even when I watched him play well (in Orléans) I believed he could be beaten. I don't think Tsonga was anywhere near his best in that match.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,959 Posts
I first saw Ymer in a Dutch Challenger two years ago. He was very bad (lost to Krawietz, an attacking player still making plenty of UEs). I have seen quite a few of his matches since and I see improvement in his serve and in his own UE count. Other than that he remains to me a very limited player. I watched him again live this year against Julian Lenz in Bordeaux. Another very bad match. He was, again, terrible in doubles in Bordeaux as well. After that I only saw the final against Pouille (on the stream) and he was completely outplayed. What I saw of him in Orléans was much better, but I doubt that he can play much better than he did there.
Court position. Mikael Ymer has improved his court position by about three meters this season, that's the very short story. You can point at the serve, forehand, returns, stamina or whatever but better court position is the only way to beat good players. That's why he started winning. He plays similarly, everything a little bit better, but above all he does not give up the court for free anymore. He has never ever hit many UEs but he was always pushed back, doesn't matter how low UE count you have if you play 5m behind the baseline.

Physical development is the other thing. Ymer is still a kid compared to his age group peers, he missed a couple of years decent training because of injuries. But he's starting to catch up by staying healthy a full year now, looks thicker now even compared to this summer.

But everyone is entitled to their opinion about a player and his game. The only thing I would definitely not hold against him is winning when playing bad. That's the single best quality a player can have. He's great at making other players bad(Oh how many times did this and that player not bring it against Ymer when the truth is he made them miss by playing the extra shot, Murray style), and he's great at winning when not playing well himself too.
 

·
MONSOON season.
Joined
·
81,392 Posts
Court position. Mikael Ymer has improved his court position by about three meters this season, that's the very short story. You can point at the serve, forehand, returns, stamina or whatever but better court position is the only way to beat good players. That's why he started winning. He plays similarly, everything a little bit better, but above all he does not give up the court for free anymore. He has never ever hit many UEs but he was always pushed back, doesn't matter how low UE count you have if you play 5m behind the baseline.

Physical development is the other thing. Ymer is still a kid compared to his age group peers, he missed a couple of years decent training because of injuries. But he's starting to catch up by staying healthy a full year now, looks thicker now even compared to this summer.

But everyone is entitled to their opinion about a player and his game. The only thing I would definitely not hold against him is winning when playing bad. That's the single best quality a player can have. He's great at making other players bad(Oh how many times did this and that player not bring it against Ymer when the truth is he made them miss by playing the extra shot, Murray style), and he's great at winning when not playing well himself too.
Thank you for an insightful and respectful response. It was sorely missing from kolrad's comments.

I hadn't noticed this change in court position but it actually makes sense. He definitely was standing far behind the baseline against Krawietz in Alphen ad Rijn. I'll be sure to pay attention to this.

I made the comment about his physical development, but I think bulking up would help him more if he played aggressively.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,459 Posts
Davidovich Fokina is at #98 in live rankings.
Of course a lot of guys can still overtake him, but with one more win - will play D. Petrovic (#195) or Y. Chung (#281) next - he would overtake 4 more players, which should be enough to make it safe in my opinion.

Uchiyama is at #107 and probably needs to make the final in Ningbo to be safe. If he's lucky SF could be enough.

Sinner is at #114 and probably needs to make the final in Antwerp. If he's lucky SF could be enough, too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,573 Posts
Davidovich Fokina should be safe now, currently at 94 after his win against Petrovic. He is the 6th player this year entering the top 100 before their 21st birthday (plus M. Ymer a few days after).
For Uchiyama, a win against Ito or Ferreira Silva in the QF might also be sufficient, but to be safe he needs two wins.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,900 Posts
Davidovich is is 100%. I wonder what his future is going to be, he's a mistery to me. Can play great tennis but also can go AWOL for months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,900 Posts
Sorry for the backlog, but wow, we're at the point that we can't put any more pics anymore, seeing there's a 20 pic per post limit. :lol:
Maybe you can f.e. merge some pictures, after all those players deserve a praise in this thread :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,900 Posts
Uchiyama is safe with the final in Ningbo challenger, so we got two new entrants this week. Sinner is down to #101, so he would need to defeat Stanimal to advance to Top100.

I think those are the last three players who will make it in 2019.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,459 Posts
With his win over Kohlschreiber, Sinner jumps to #91.
A lot of possibilities remain, but under normal circumstances entry #24 of the year should happen next week.

Most productive year since we have this thread on MTF.

2018: 18
2017: 15
2016: 19
2015: 22
2014: 11
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,573 Posts
Sinner made it with a win against Kohlschreiber who is almost double his age. He was ranked around 800 one year ago and is the 24th and maybe last player to enter this year.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,900 Posts
What a story it would be if Marcos Giron entered Top100 in the last tournament of the year

Not likely, but also not impossible. He has to win Houston, Duckworth must lose to Clark in Pune final and Karlovic must lose to O'Connell in the other Houston semi (Giron plays against Krueger in the first semi). Then - Giron would advance to the #100 position
 
181 - 200 of 207 Posts
Top