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One thing I wonder about this surface is, given the rectangles of glass are supported by metal struts, wouldn't the ball bounce higher along the joins where the glass can't flex?

Personally I don't see this as a bad thing - grass and clay both give imperfect bounces, which makes them more interesting than concrete IMO. But I wonder is this the case with glass, or do they have a way of making the ball bounce uniformly across the rectangles?
 

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Discussion Starter #64
One thing I wonder about this surface is, given the rectangles of glass are supported by metal struts, wouldn't the ball bounce higher along the joins where the glass can't flex?

Personally I don't see this as a bad thing - grass and clay both give imperfect bounces, which makes them more interesting than concrete IMO. But I wonder is this the case with glass, or do they have a way of making the ball bounce uniformly across the rectangles?
Ideally, the ball would bounce just like on carpet (in terms of both uniform jumps and height). Again, given the visual advantages, players would be able to react faster and reach the ball better than they would on carpet.
 

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Ideally, the ball would bounce just like on carpet (in terms of both uniform jumps and height).
But glass isn't like carpet or hard, where the layer underneath is solid. With glass it's rectangles laid on a metal frame with nothing underneath, at least that's how it was in the video. Illumination for the lines and graphics if needed, are underneath the glass. So there has to be an empty space under the glass. Given that glass is quite flexible, the middle of the glass rectangles should absorb more force than the sides and give a lower bounce.

I'm all for glass because it should give a very low bounce like grass or wood, ie fast, and be less hard on the feet than concrete or clay.
 

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Discussion Starter #66
But glass isn't like carpet or hard, where the layer underneath is solid. With glass it's rectangles laid on a metal frame with nothing underneath, at least that's how it was in the video. Illumination for the lines and graphics if needed, are underneath the glass. So there has to be an empty space under the glass. Given that glass is quite flexible, the middle of the glass rectangles should absorb more force than the sides and give a lower bounce.

I'm all for glass because it should give a very low bounce like grass or wood, ie fast, and be less hard on the feet than concrete or clay.
The edges should indeed vibrate less than the middle of a rectangle, but if the panel is thick enough to support the weight of players, a tiny tennis ball would not have a visible effect at the edge compared to the middle of the rectangle.

And yes, the bounce should be low like carpet, and the surface should not be hard on the feet at all, like grass. The only thing that has a moderate level of difficulty is making sure the surface is also slip resistant, and this may affect the bounce of the ball, depending on the coating.
 

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I don't think that is will be used any time soon. Due to cost considerations, it can't be tried out challengers or futures. The only option is someone like Tiriac.

More importantly, I don't see the top players accepting it. They cried fowl before even trying out the blue clay.

The way I see it, glass surface will used in other sports a lot earlier than in tennis. Would like to proven wrong though.

The floor can be used to accurately pinpoint the ball anywhere it lands (much higher than the Hawkeye system) and it can also be used to track the player's movements, actively being able to show movement statistics to spectators and even to players.
Then Sports Analytics can really enter into tennis. :drool:
 

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The way I see it, glass surface will used in other sports a lot earlier than in tennis. Would like to proven wrong though.

Then Sports Analytics can really enter into tennis. :drool:
As mentioned earlier, it is already used in squash tournaments! A sport that is played indoors and pretty similar to tennis.
 

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impossible will not happen

there is no way to make glass safe to play on and there is no incentive

what could glass possibly bring to the table that is not available on hardcourt now? they have electronic ball tracking technology that is insanely accurate as it is

glass is too dangerous and frankly kind of a silly idea. they may or may not be able to make it non-slippery BUT beyond that there is just too much risk that a player could slam there racquet down, spray some glass and cut somebody. I know that sounds far fetched, but the reality is that something like that is possible, even if only a 100th of a percent, while impossible on hard court

I like clay and hard and grass fine. if anything possibly consider bringing back more grass or even carpet

let me just say this though-

this thread is entirely illogical in a way and anyway who believes they will seriously consider bringing glass to the tour as a surface for ONE reason- if carpet was deemed to dangerous and unnecessary for players (it brought nothing to the table really that unique from HC and indoor), then what are the odds that glass does not have the same problems?

I am hoping the OP was just kidding around at time of writing
 

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I don't think that is will be used any time soon. Due to cost considerations, it can't be tried out challengers or futures. The only option is someone like Tiriac.

More importantly, I don't see the top players accepting it. They cried fowl before even trying out the blue clay.

The way I see it, glass surface will used in other sports a lot earlier than in tennis. Would like to proven wrong though.



Then Sports Analytics can really enter into tennis. :drool:
for something to be successful in ANY department of life, store shelves, sports venues, clothing on people, etc.- there has to be a NEED or demand that is filled

glass courts do not provide anything we don't already have or any vast improvement. there are already incredibly advanced ball reading technology and comfortable conditions on HC.
if anything, glass courts would create more problems than they solve
also: Tiriac wanted more viewers so he took a traditional surface and changed the COLOR. even someone like him isn't crazy enough to try a new untested surface (widely tested at least) because there are so many possibilities of being held liable if things go wrong
 

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Discussion Starter #73
impossible will not happen

there is no way to make glass safe to play on and there is no incentive

what could glass possibly bring to the table that is not available on hardcourt now? they have electronic ball tracking technology that is insanely accurate as it is

glass is too dangerous and frankly kind of a silly idea.
Such a childish reply coming right now in this thread. You did not read a word from this thread until now. Glass can be made bullet proof nowadays. Not a single scratch from a projectile hitting with more than the speed of sound. How is that dangerous?

Glass can be made not slippery at all. Have you not read the poster above you saying that it is already used in squash?

Get to reading and stop posting until you have the information.
 

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glass courts do not provide anything we don't already have or any vast improvement.
The advantages as I see it are:
- Plays like wood but can be used outdoors.
- Plays like grass but requires ZERO upkeep.
- Less hard on the knees than concrete.
- Lasts FOREVER with ZERO maintenance. Lines are UNDERNEATH the glass so will NEVER need to be re-painted.
 

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I'm not arguing against glass - I don't know much about the subject and am intrigued by the possibility.

Still, most of the advantages that tripler just listed related to maintenance...what is the initial cost of a glass surface?

Because if the initial cost is huge and prohibitive, it's hard to see venue owners making their money back, even over the long term, through reduced maintenance costs. And it's hard to see the initial costs going down significantly if there's not a decent volume of buyers. (Though perhaps squash and other sports could adopt it widely enough to begin to bring prices down.)

Do we have any hard comparative numbers on initial installation costs?
 

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Discussion Starter #79
Let's stop talking about cost for a moment.

Yes, it's about twice to thrice the cost of a regular indoor tournament.

BUT...

A glass indoor hall can be used to host 5-7 different sports, without ANY CHANGE to the center.
 
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