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Just got it. Lots of players talking about their matches and life on the tour with Hewitt. Hewitt was a marvel of a player, at his prime best in early 2000s, always fiery, feisty, driven like a demon, you knew he was gonna give it 200% every time out. And he was more intense even than Rafa, sometimes an in your face player, yelling COME AWWWN in the very first games of matches.

274 pages. Can't wait to read what the likes of Sampras, Corretja, Canas, Rusedski, Spadea, Tarango, Tsonga, Monfils, Gasquet, Simon, Delpo, Fed, Rafa, etc etc have to say about playing Hewitt.
 

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You plugged your own book without telling people it was written by you with the Rios book. Now Hewitt?

I'll pass.
 

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As a fan of tennis bios and tennis players' storybooks, I would like to add something to the discussion.

I got the Rios book "the man we barely knew" and it is poorly written, the interviews are unpolished and full of grammar mistakes probably from how those people speak...

No love in what is written, and it is just terribly painful to read. It's like copypasting scripts of interviews without a trail or well put together to create a story or give shape to an idea.

I have to finish a book once I start one.. that's my rule, but Im having such a hard time trying to carry on page after page... I think I left it something around page 60 two months ago and I just can't find the strengh to carry on.

Im sorry but "the man we barely knew" together with Arantxa Sanchez Vicario's book are the worst Tennis Biographies or players related books I have ever read... Third in the list comes Bjorn Borg's biography as well as Vilas', but they are kind of excusable because back then the format wasn't the one we're used to and they just innovated in their ways.

For all those interested about Arantxa Sanchez Vicario's biography, this are my thoughts: It consists on a few chapters beating around the bushes for pages and pages and pages on different topics, and no anecdote with actual value.
A jewell is having Martina Hingis refeered as Martina Higgins page after page (in the index, you can find her as Higgins and she is called like that more than 5 times...there is no Hingis in the whole crapfest), you get the feeling somebody else wrote it with very few insight and pure generic crap such as Wikipedia data -and they didn't even care to make it look otherwise! the chapter on stats is just a wikipedia copypaste of the statistic page of Arantxa Sanchez Vicario, literally the same chart, same format, same same same).

If you are the writer of this The mane we barely knew, man! please don't keep writing this way... It has no value, you have to add a story, a plot, some development... and please, cut the "you knows" from the interview transcripts and take care of the repetition of words and phrases... the quality of the book is quite poor in that department and so far, I feel I haven't learnt a thing about the guy other than he is a talented prick that is very private and shy,... except for that one time he smiled to someone.... or held the door to this other... No intention on being disrespectful

:hatoff:
 

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As a fan of tennis bios and tennis players' storybooks, I would like to add something to the discussion.

I got the Rios book "the man we barely knew" and it is poorly written, the interviews are unpolished and full of grammar mistakes probably from how those people speak...

No love in what is written, and it is just terribly painful to read. It's like copypasting scripts of interviews without a trail or well put together to create a story or give shape to an idea.

I have to finish a book once I start one.. that's my rule, but Im having such a hard time trying to carry on page after page... I think I left it something around page 60 two months ago and I just can't find the strengh to carry on.

Im sorry but "the man we barely knew" together with Arantxa Sanchez Vicario's book are the worst Tennis Biographies or players related books I have ever read... Third in the list comes Bjorn Borg's biography as well as Vilas', but they are kind of excusable because back then the format wasn't the one we're used to and they just innovated in their ways.

For all those interested about Arantxa Sanchez Vicario's biography, this are my thoughts: It consists on a few chapters beating around the bushes for pages and pages and pages on different topics, and no anecdote with actual value.
A jewell is having Martina Hingis refeered as Martina Higgins page after page (in the index, you can find her as Higgins and she is called like that more than 5 times...there is no Hingis in the whole crapfest), you get the feeling somebody else wrote it with very few insight and pure generic crap such as Wikipedia data -and they didn't even care to make it look otherwise! the chapter on stats is just a wikipedia copypaste of the statistic page of Arantxa Sanchez Vicario, literally the same chart, same format, same same same).

If you are the writer of this The mane we barely knew, man! please don't keep writing this way... It has no value, you have to add a story, a plot, some development... and please, cut the "you knows" from the interview transcripts and take care of the repetition of words and phrases... the quality of the book is quite poor in that department and so far, I feel I haven't learnt a thing about the guy other than he is a talented prick that is very private and shy,... except for that one time he smiled to someone.... or held the door to this other... No intention on being disrespectful

:hatoff:

Have you read Monica Seles' book. That's one book I'd be interested in reading, how was it?


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Have you read Monica Seles' book. That's one book I'd be interested in reading, how was it?


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I have it, and I actually scanned it trying to find info about the Yugoslavia separation war but there was nothing about that conflict. I was looking for the Seles-Ivanisevic wordwar about which side should each of them take...but there was nothing written on that which was quite disappointing.

In fact, I read some bits on her having a weight problem... I haven't read it completely, as I said, I needed to use some parts for the show I work for about tennis stories, and was disappointed on that regards, but as soon as I read it (it is in my list of books to read next) Ill let you know
 

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I have it, and I actually scanned it trying to find info about the Yugoslavia separation war but there was nothing about that conflict. I was looking for the Seles-Ivanisevic wordwar about which side should each of them take...but there was nothing written on that which was quite disappointing.



In fact, I read some bits on her having a weight problem... I haven't read it completely, as I said, I needed to use some parts for the show I work for about tennis stories, and was disappointed on that regards, but as soon as I read it (it is in my list of books to read next) Ill let you know

Cool thx!


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depends if the book gets Chela or Coria's interviews.
I don't think so. It looks boring.

A quick excerpt from my next book “Facing Hewitt” which will be published in late spring/early summer…

“It just blew my mind.”

Taylor Dent: “I saw him in the juniors. We grew up playing in the juniors. My first memory is kind of out of nowhere. He was always a good junior player but out of nowhere he got a wildcard into Adelaide and he ended up winning the thing. And he beat a lot of good players on the way to the title. It just blew my mind.”
Describe what it was like to play him?
“It was tough for me. It was a disaster of a match up. I played him a lot of times. I only ever got him once. Actually in his hometown of Adelaide. And he was just tough. I liked attacking. And he was very accurate with his shots. He was able to dip it down at my feet. When I came to the net, he was able to lob it over my head. It posed a lot of problems for my style of game.”
You must have played extremely well the day you beat him?
“You know what? It’s interesting. The courts were quick and I kind of changed the tactics a little bit. I ended up staying back at the baseline and just kind of chipping and waiting for a golden opportunity to come in. And he was a little bit off. He didn’t pass quite as well as normal. And that’s kind of the way how it goes.”
Do you have a memory or anecdote that captures Hewitt’s essence, on or off court?
“Off court, for me, he was always great. There was the stage when I was – I was getting good enough coming up to where I was being considered for Davis Cup. And so obviously with my background – my dad’s Australian – he gave me a call up to try and lobby for me to come play for the Australian team. And he was very nice on the phone and that’s kind of how he was. A good guy, a straight-forward guy. He doesn’t really beat-around-the-bush too much and I appreciate that.”

Hewitt leads series 5-1

2001 Wimbledon R64 Hewitt 16 75 63 67 63
2001 Indianapolis R32 Hewitt 62 76
2003 Scottsdale SF Hewitt 62 64
2005 Adelaide QF Dent 76 63
2005 Wimbledon R16 Hewitt 64 64 67 63
2005 US Open R32 Hewitt 63 36 67 62 75
———————————–

“I expected to steamroll the kid.”

Vince Spadea: “I played against Hewitt in the 1998 quarters at Adelaide, his hometown in the south of Australia, when he was a sixteen year old wildcard. Everyone was wondering how he got a wildcard in the first place, because he was like No. 500 in the world at the time and nobody had ever heard of him. Some of the other Australian players were mystified. He had just played a Satellite, which is an even lower pro tournament than a Challenger, that has since been mostly phased out in favor of Futures, the week before Adelaide, and he had lost to a nobody. Our match was a night match, center court. I see this little guy with long blond hair who looks like a surfer, walk out on the court. I figure: ‘I’m in the semis. This kid is sixteen and he looked weak, inexperienced, unrehearsed, and unpolished.’”
“The match begins and he’s holding his own. He keeps on hitting balls in the court. I wasn’t playing strongly enough or consistently enough to overpower him even though I’ve got him outweighed by about forty pounds. I end up losing the first set 7-5. Now I’m thinking: ‘What does this kid think he’s doing?’ He didn’t miss one shot long the entire set. My dad, who was coaching me, said after the match, ‘He missed into the net and he missed wide but he never missed past the baseline.’ Whenever Hewitt won a big point he screeched out, ‘COME ON’ and punched the air with his fist. I thought that was a little annoying and cocky of him but I didn’t let it bother or intimidate me. I won the second set 6-3. I had been working with Jim Pierce (coach and father of Mary Pierce), so I was in great shape. I had been killing myself in training. I expected to steamroll the kid in the third set. But instead, he put his game into another gear and beat me soundly 6-1 to win the match.”
“The next day I was sitting eating breakfast with my dad in the player’s cafeteria and Brad Gilbert, coach of Andre Agassi, walked up to us and completely ignored me. He approached my dad and said, ‘Your son had Hewitt last night but he choked. Andre will show you how to handle the kid tonight.’”
“Of course, Hewitt straight-setted Agassi 76 76 and then went on to win the tournament. Hewitt has gone on to win almost twenty million in his career, along with a Wimbledon and U.S. Open title. He’s a true warrior on the court. He doesn’t get fazed by disappointment or failure. He doesn’t worry about if he’s hitting the ball great or if he’s winning or losing, he just enjoys the battle. The only other player who battled as successfully as Hewitt was Jimmy Connors. Hewitt will never give up and he doesn’t mind if he has to win hard or easy. He’s one of the greatest competitors in tennis.”
Hewitt leads series 7-0

1998 Adelaide QF Hewitt 75 36 61
1999 Lyon SF Hewitt 63 63
2003 Indian Wells Masters Hewitt 75 61
2006 Sydney R32 Hewitt 26 75 63
2006 San Jose SF Hewitt 63 64
2006 Washington DC Hewitt R32 67 76 64
2007 Las Vegas RR Hewitt 63 63

————————–

“He was a lion on the court.”

Davide Sanguinetti: “I played him when he was No. 1 in the world. He was the best. I remember once in Cincinnati and I retired. Because my daughter was gonna be born so I had to leave. So I found an excuse and I run away with it. But I don’t think I had a chance with him that day [smiles].”
What was it like to play Hewitt at his best (in previous round of Cincinnati match with Sanguinetti, Hewitt beat Robby Ginepri 6-0 6-0)?
“I think it was tough to make a point because he was such a fighter on the court, which he still is, but before he could run a little faster than now. And to make a point you had to sweat because of the pain. He was all around. You cannot say he had like unbelievable forehand, backhand, but he was an all around player. That he put all his heart out on the court. He was a lion on the court.”
Hewitt leads series 2-0
2001 ‘S-Hertogenbosch R32 Hewitt 62 61
2002 Cincinnati Masters R32 Hewitt 50 (ret.)

———————————

“Turning point in tennis history.”

Ivan Ljubicic: “When I played Hewitt he had just won Wimbledon. He was at the top of his game. I remember that I qualified and I think it was quarterfinals so for me it was a great week anyway. And it was 7-6 6-7 and he ended up winning 6-4. I was 5-1 down and I came back to 5-4 and he won it. But it’s incredible that we played only once and we were around together on the Tour maybe fifteen years. And not ever close – I can’t remember like even being close to playing him. So it’s unbelievable. But obviously he is a great fighter and I think the way he managed his career – we would love that he played more. For so many years after U.S. Open he would take a break and prepare for Australian Open. I feel like, with all the injuries that he had, and he had many, the type of game that he played, he managed his tennis incredibly well. To be able to be still on the Tour at 33 and still fighting and playing at this level.”
Did anything surprise you about him?
“No, not really. The thing is that he’s an unbelievable fighter. But what I say – it doesn’t mean he’s only saying ‘COME ON’ – he finds the way to win matches. He’s always very, very difficult to play. Obviously, with now, it’s different than it was ten years ago. But to win Wimbledon, to win U.S. Open with the game that he had, back then, it was a turning point in the history of tennis. Because he was the first one really to win Wimbledon from the baseline, like playing this way, not like Agassi, because he was still hitting the balls. He was the first one to really, like, demolish Sampras’ serve in the final of U.S. Open. So he is, let’s say, the first one of this new generation of really, really solid players.”
Did you get along well with Hewitt off court? Ever practice together?
“We practiced a few times. He’s really shy, actually, you know, incredibly. Off the court he’s kind of calm, doesn’t really talk to anybody, really shy. We obviously, being of similar age, we got along because we spent so much time together on the Tour. So I like him a lot, actually.”
Hewitt leads head to head 1-0
2001 Cincinnati Masters QF Hewitt 76 67 64
http://www.tennis-prose.com/articles/facing-hewitt-book-excerpt/
 

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Discussion Starter #10

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Discussion Starter #11
Have you read Monica Seles' book. That's one book I'd be interested in reading, how was it?


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Seles has like 3 books out already. All of them are very good and worth reading. Hope Capriati decides to do one someday but I read somewhere she turned down the guy who did the Spadea book to do a book together. Capriati could do a helluva bio. Did Graf ever do one in English?
 

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C'mon!

Hewitt!!! One of the best! his game was tailor made to beat great serve and volley players. Unfortunately, the courts slowed down and killed serve and volley tennis.
Federer changed from a serve and volley player to an all-court baseliner, after that it was GSM Federer.
 

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You can't judge a book by it's cover :). Also, Pete Rafa and Andre's book covers were just basic face shots too. McEnroe had a cool cover.
But people do. How do you take a book seriously when they don't spend $500 to make a decent cover. Seriously. It's not that expensive. It's book publishing 101
 

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Is that even Hewitt on the cover?
 

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What's with this cover, looks like it was made with paint in 20 seconds :haha: , 2014... :confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
No major American publisher would invest in any book about Lleyton Hewitt though Hewitt absolutely is an important player in tennis history and a very worthy subject of a book.

FYI Steve Tignor wrote that Facing Federer "addictive." Justin Gimelstob tweeted it's "an excellent book. Fun read." The "Facing (blank) formula obviously has it's positive supporters.
 
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