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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
There are a few threads around, but I find stuff fairly often, and people might be interested in it...so here we go. A sort of nice story from New Orleans.

http://www.news.com.au/story/0,10117,16565077-23109,00.html
BAYING forlornly, hissing at strangers and increasingly dehydrated and hungry, tens of thousands of pets have probably been left behind in the devastated US city of New Orleans, animal care agencies say.

Animal rescue workers from across the United States are combing the city deserted by its citizens when Hurricane Katrina approached almost two weeks ago. They wade through thigh-high muck, commandeer abandoned boats and use crowbars to bring stranded animals to safety.
"The cats are terrible. Out of every 10, nine are scratching and biting and hissing," said Jane Garrison of the Humane Society United States as she cuddled two terrified dogs in an aluminum dinghy.

Dogs often leaped into their arms, she said.

The society estimated that 60 per cent of central New Orleans' half a million people had pets of one sort or another, said spokeswoman Renee Bafalas.

How many of those were left behind when their owners evacuated is anybody's guess.

But judging from the numbers of dogs seen pacing around on roofs of flooded homes or in wind-savaged neighbourhoods and being brought out by rescue workers, the number is likely to be high.
On Thursday night, there were 1,700 animals at a pet collection center set up by the Louisiana Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, the Humane Society and its state branches at Gonzales, between Baton Rouge and New Orleans, Bafalas said.

Many others had already been united with their owners.

The rescuers are working off lists of stranded animals reported to hotlines by evacuated owners.

Invariably, though, when they turn up at an address where they know a pet has been left behind, they also hear or see other animals in the neighborhood that need rescuing. The countrywide SPCA and Humane Society workers operating in New Orleans have been given authority to break into houses where they think there are animals in distress.

Sometimes the only thing that greets their knocks and shouts at a locked door is a strong stench of death. More often, they find a live animal to return to its owner. Dogs in particular, the rescue workers say, have held up well.

"We've been surprised that most of them were in good condition," said Lieutenant Randy Covey of the Oregon Humane Society.

"Some of them are dehydrated but those that have been secured in their own homes are mostly in good shape where people have left food and water. Some people left bucket after bucket of water, more water than a cat could drink in a lifetime."

Bafalas said she did not think the animal rescue agencies were overwhelmed by the scale of the New Orleans disaster, if only because the response from SPCA and Humane Society organizations across the United States had itself been so overwhelming.

Tim Rickey of the Humane Society of Missouri was less sure.

"My guess is that before this is over, they're going to have to set up a second collection site. This is much bigger than they thought," he said.
 

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MTF. Never changes!
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Discussion Starter #2
Article from Australian news tonight
Iceland's commercial whaling resumption 'a mockery'
8:03 PM October 18


The federal Environment Minister, Ian Campbell, says the decision by Iceland to resume commercial whaling makes a mockery of claims it cares about the environment.

Iceland has announced it will allow whalers to harpoon 30 minke whales and nine fin whales between now and the end of August next year, flouting international bans.

The fin whale, the second biggest whale after the blue whale, is on the endangered species list, but Iceland insisted that the quota would not hurt what it termed "abundant" stocks in the North Atlantic.

An International Whaling Commission (IWC) moratorium on commercial whaling has been in force since 1986. Iceland left the IWC in 1992 but rejoined in 2002, saying it would not be bound by the moratorium.

"There are very good reasons to authorise the hunt," Karsten Klepsvik, Norway's representative to the IWC, said. Iceland's decision "helps normalise the whaling issue".

Senator Campbell says its a very irresponsible move. "I think it will raise doubts right around the world about Iceland's commitment to environmental issues," he said. "It is really a very sad day for the world, when a first world, developed country like Iceland should effectively tear up one of the great environmental achievements of the world from the last century, that is the moratorium on whaling."

Norway, until now the only country to openly conduct commercial whaling, hailed Iceland's decision to resume the controversial practice after a 16-year suspension.

Japan, which carries out whaling for what it claims is scientific research, declined to comment directly on Iceland's decision but said it supported commercial whaling.

Norway has authorised whalers to hunt 1,052 minke whales in the 2006 season, the biggest quota allowed since the Scandinavian country decided to resume the commercial hunt in 1993. But Norwegian whalers have failed to fill their quotas for several years in a row, citing poor weather conditions, the high price of petrol and a saturated market for whale meat.

Opponents of the whale hunt say the latter shows a lack of interest for whale meat. In June, the IWC narrowly passed a resolution declaring that the 20-year-old moratorium on commercial hunting was "no longer necessary". However, a 75 per cent majority is needed for the moratorium to be overturned.

- ABC/AFP
Source: ABC/AFP
 

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Thanks for the articles Kristen. They were a good read. But it's sad what happens to animals in this world. :(
 

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I'm not exactly a hippie AD. ;) I just love animals and the environment. :cat:
 

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MTF. Never changes!
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Discussion Starter #8
I hug trees when I've had a bit to drink, AD;)
Less hippie than I used to be though. My wardrobe has changed a lot, thank goodness :)
 

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I once took a college class where I had to go out and sit with a tree for a while.

I didn't learn much through that, but maybe the tree did.

Attractive tree though. :hearts:
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
:lol: I know the feeling MisterQ.
I took a class run by the 'Social Ecology' lecturers...my uni was based out near the mountains so it was very environmental...and one time they got us in pairs, walking through a garden, one of us with our eyes closed. When we'd get to the tree they'd say something like 'you're not only touching the tree, the tree is touching you!'. This event amused us for several semesters. [I studied Land Manamement and Conservation, so we were green, just...not airy fairy hippy-like]

Anyway, I have another couple of articles. One on Orangutans, as they're my #1 animal, after my dog. And another little one because omg it's Vegan Day on November 1 (I never knew it existed. Maybe it's new!?)

WA ORANGUTAN TO EMBARK ON 'GREAT ADVENTURE'
By Adam Gartrell, www.news.com. au

Oct 26 - SHE'S only fourteen years old, but Temara is about to embark alone on a great adventure.

Temara's a Sumatran Orangutan, and after spending her entire life in captivity at Perth Zoo with her mother, Puteri, she will travel next week to her new home in the rainforests of Indonesia.

She will be released into a protected Indonesian national park as part of an international effort to re-establish a population of the critically endangered species.

It will be the first time a zoo-born orangutan has been released into the wild.

A team of veterinarians, keepers and zoo officials have spent the past year meticulously planning and preparing for the transfer. Temara, hand-picked for the role based on her age, sex, health and
temperament, has recently been introduced to Indonesian fruits, live termites and the wide variety of leaves she'll encounter in the wild.

She had also been given access to a high fig tree to hone her climbing and nest-making skills and improve her fitness and muscle tone. Temara will be carefully monitored for at least 12 months to assess how she adjusts.

Perth Zoo has the capacity to breed orangutans for release into the wild on an ongoing basis, depending on how things pan out with Temara.

It is believed there are only 7300 Sumatran Orangutans left in the wild. They are the slowest reproducing species on earth and face extinction in the wild within 15 years.

http://www.news. com.au/dailytele graph/story/ 0,22049,20649993 -5001028, 00.html
WORLD VEGAN DAY - WEDNESDAY 1ST NOVEMBER

This year to celebrate World Vegan Day we're hosting a vegan BBQ at Wynyard Park in the city. We will be setting up from 9am and will start to cook delicious Fry's burgers (500 of them) to give away to
Park goers as an alternative to eating dead animal flesh on this great day.

If you can spare an hour or two on the day to help put burgers together and hand them out with a Beyond Vegan booklet that would be fantastic. If you can also help in the chopping of veggies in the morning that would be even better!!
Sounds like a good day out for a free feed! I'm going to try to con a mate into having lunch with me! I want to be a better vegetarian. Right now I have a million double standards :tape:

PS. I got my leather boots fixed (heel, sole and toe) so...I dunno...it makes me feel a bit better about my leather boots 'thing'.

Both articles are from the Animal Liberation [AU] Yahoo Group.
 

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I once took a college class where I had to go out and sit with a tree for a while.

I didn't learn much through that, but maybe the tree did.

Attractive tree though. :hearts:
What class was that?
 

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I hug trees when I've had a bit to drink, AD;)
Less hippie than I used to be though. My wardrobe has changed a lot, thank goodness :)
I am probably still a hippy - and proud of it :) Thanks for the articles Kristen - though you know me - anything about cruelty to animals or any kind of animal suffering makes me cry :tears:
 

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MTF. Never changes!
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Discussion Starter #13
I thought this thread was due for some happy news, Rosie :)

Whenever I find happy articles like these ones I'll be sure to post them as well :yeah:
 

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I thought this thread was due for some happy news, Rosie :)

Whenever I find happy articles like these ones I'll be sure to post them as well :yeah:
Thanks - look forward to it :hug: I could do with some happy news now my tennis travels have ended til next year :sad:
 

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MTF. Never changes!
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Discussion Starter #15
Ahh... right after I say I'll bring good news, I bring bad news. I'm looking for merchandise from some of these places and came across the article about a dolphin slaughter. Who the f*ck slaughters dolphins? I thought... Japan does. Of course! Japan. My favourite. For a nation that is apparently so intelligent - so I was lead to believe - they are responsible for a lot of f*cked up actions.

(Also, theres a petition some might be interested in...just to show that animals are important. http://www.wspa.org.au/news.asp?track=true&newsID=254 )

Every year between the months of October and March, Japan kills more than 20,000 dolphins through their ‘drive hunts’. This is a method of hunting dolphins whereby pods of dolphins are driven into bays and coves to be cruelly killed. The meat from these dolphins is then sold in local markets for human consumption.

Some dolphins driven into these coves are spared the violent death, but unfortunately an equally cruel fate awaits them – a lifetime in captivity. Unscrupulous dolphinariums financially support the hunts by buying live dolphins - usually young females - from the fisherman to be used for captive display.

These animals witness the slaughter of their close family group before being transported off to live the rest of their lives confined in pools as ‘entertainment’.

Between October 2003 and March 2004, 78 dolphins were captured during the drive hunts and sold to dolphinaria.
http://www.wspa.org.au/news.asp?newsID=263
 

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I'm really worried about the global warming and poverty in the world :scared: :fiery: :timebomb: :rain:

At least, some good news: in Brazil, for the 2nd year in a row there is a decrease of deforestation in the Amazon forest. :D
30% and 31% ! Not incipient.

I highly recommend the books of Jared Diamond: "Collapse" and "Guns, germs and steel". :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter #18
Happy ending:
Whale freed from shark nets in Qld
Thursday Nov 2 15:18 AEDT
A whale caught in shark netting off Queensland's Sunshine Coast has been freed after a four-hour rescue operation.

The seven-metre adult humpback whale was sighted off Point Arkwright, south of Coolum Beach, about 7.30am (AEST) on Thursday.

Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries Shark Control Program manager Baden Lane said the animal had been heavily entangled in the nets which it had towed from Coolum Beach.

Members of the Marine Animal Release Team worked for four hours to cut the ropes from the animal, calling in extra help from the Gold Coast team who brought new knives specifically designed for cutting animals free from ropes and shark netting.

The humpback was freed at 11.30am (AEST).

Mr Lane said the whale remained calm during the rescue and was in the company of other whales.

He said it was more common for juvenile whales to be caught in shark nets due to their inexperience in identifying obstructions in the water and understanding the acoustic warning alarms placed on all shark nets.

Twenty-one whales have been caught in shark netting in Queensland since 2000, he said. Of those, 16 whales had been freed by the Marine Animal Release Teams on the Gold Coast, Mackay, Mooloolaba and Noosa.

The whale was the fourth animal to become entangled at the Sunshine Coast since 1990 with all being released alive.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
RABBIT MUTILATOR HAS MIND DISEASE: JUDGE

Nov 3 - A Sydney financier jailed for 16 months over the mutilation
deaths of 17 rabbits has successfully appealed his conviction on the
grounds of mental illness.

Brendan Francis McMahon, 37, was convicted and sentenced to a maximum
of 16 months' jail in July on 18 counts of aggravated animal cruelty.

The New Zealand-born financier used his company credit card to
purchase the animals before torturing them to death and dumping their
corpses in and around his inner-city office building.

McMahon had argued he should be found not guilty on mental health
grounds, claiming he was smoking $250 worth of ice every three days in
the month leading up to and during the crimes.

In appealing the conviction, McMahon's barrister Douglas Marr said his
client had a "disease of the mind" for which the drugs were only a
trigger.

District Court Judge Peter Berman quashed McMahon's conviction, saying
that sentencing magistrate Ian Barnett had erred in rejecting the
mental health defence.

"I am satisfied that the accused suffered a disease of the mind and
the psychosis was not due to drugs alone," Judge Berman said in his
judgment.

Judge Berman was to deliver further orders in the case on Thursday
afternoon.

http://www.smh. com.au/articles/ 2006/11/03/ 1162340038297. html


:tape: I didn't mean to kill and torture them... I just have mental issues. Obviously.
 

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:sad:

'Only 50 years left' for sea fish

By Richard Black
Environment correspondent, BBC News website

There will be virtually nothing left to fish from the seas by the middle of the century if current trends continue, according to a major scientific study.

Stocks have collapsed in nearly one-third of sea fisheries, and the rate of decline is accelerating.

Writing in the journal Science, the international team of researchers says fishery decline is closely tied to a broader loss of marine biodiversity.

But a greater use of protected areas could safeguard existing stocks.

"The way we use the oceans is that we hope and assume there will always be another species to exploit after we've completely gone through the last one," said research leader Boris Worm, from Dalhousie University in Canada.

This century is the last century of wild seafood
Steve Palumbi
"What we're highlighting is there is a finite number of stocks; we have gone through one-third, and we are going to get through the rest," he told the BBC News website.

Steve Palumbi, from Stanford University in California, one of the other scientists on the project, added: "Unless we fundamentally change the way we manage all the ocean species together, as working ecosystems, then this century is the last century of wild seafood."

Spanning the seas

This is a vast piece of research, incorporating scientists from many institutions in Europe and the Americas, and drawing on four distinctly different kinds of data.

Catch records from the open sea give a picture of declining fish stocks.
In 2003, 29% of open sea fisheries were in a state of collapse, defined as a decline to less than 10% of their original yield.

Bigger vessels, better nets, and new technology for spotting fish are not bringing the world's fleets bigger returns - in fact, the global catch fell by 13% between 1994 and 2003.

Historical records from coastal zones in North America, Europe and Australia also show declining yields, in step with declining species diversity; these are yields not just of fish, but of other kinds of seafood too.

Zones of biodiversity loss also tended to see more beach closures, more blooms of potentially harmful algae, and more coastal flooding.

We should protect biodiversity, and it does pay off through fisheries yield
Carl Gustaf Lundin
Experiments performed in small, relatively contained ecosystems show that reductions in diversity tend to bring reductions in the size and robustness of local fish stocks. This implies that loss of biodiversity is driving the declines in fish stocks seen in the large-scale studies.

The final part of the jigsaw is data from areas where fishing has been banned or heavily restricted.

These show that protection brings back biodiversity within the zone, and restores populations of fish just outside.

"The image I use to explain why biodiversity is so important is that marine life is a bit like a house of cards," said Dr Worm.

"All parts of it are integral to the structure; if you remove parts, particularly at the bottom, it's detrimental to everything on top and threatens the whole structure.

"And we're learning that in the oceans, species are very strongly linked to each other - probably more so than on land."

Protected interest

What the study does not do is attribute damage to individual activities such as over-fishing, pollution or habitat loss; instead it paints a picture of the cumulative harm done across the board.

Even so, a key implication of the research is that more of the oceans should be protected.

But the extent of protection is not the only issue, according to Carl Gustaf Lundin, head of the global marine programme at IUCN, the World Conservation Union.

"The benefits of marine-protected areas are quite clear in a few cases; there's no doubt that protecting areas leads to a lot more fish and larger fish, and less vulnerability," he said.

"But you also have to have good management of marine parks and good management of fisheries. Clearly, fishing should not wreck the ecosystem, bottom trawling being a good example of something which does wreck the ecosystem."

But, he said, the concept of protecting fish stocks by protecting biodiversity does make sense.

"This is a good compelling case; we should protect biodiversity, and it does pay off even in simple monetary terms through fisheries yield."

Protecting stocks demands the political will to act on scientific advice - something which Boris Worm finds lacking in Europe, where politicians have ignored recommendations to halt the iconic North Sea cod fishery year after year.

Without a ban, scientists fear the North Sea stocks could follow the Grand Banks cod of eastern Canada into apparently terminal decline.

"I'm just amazed, it's very irrational," he said.

"You have scientific consensus and nothing moves. It's a sad example; and what happened in Canada should be such a warning, because now it's collapsed it's not coming back."

1. Experiments show that reducing the diversity of an ecosystem lowers the abundance of fish
2. Historical records show extensive loss of biodiversity along coasts since 1800, with the collapse of about 40% of species. About one-third of once viable coastal fisheries are now useless
3. Catch records from the open ocean show widespread decline of fisheries since 1950 with the rate of decline increasing. In 2003, 29% of fisheries were collapsed. Biodiverse regions' stocks fare better
4. Marine reserves and no-catch zones bring an average 23% improvement in biodiversity and an increase in fish stocks around the protected area
[email protected]

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/science/nature/6108414.stm

Published: 2006/11/02 19:01:25 GMT

© BBC MMVI
 
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