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justice for all
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Until he was 27-28 he was a good but highly inconsistent player who reached 4R and occasionally QF in slams and 1 masters final. Then, all of the sudden, soon after Magnus Norman took over as his coach at the age 29-30-31 he became a different animal (Stanimal that is) and won 3 slams beating the BIG3 members on every occasion.

He simply took late blooming to another level. I believe there wasn't another player (at least in the Open Era) who started winning big so late in his career.

But my question to you: is Stan an exception proving the rule, a one of a kind player OR will we see more players winning multiply slams starting when they approach 30?
 

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I think Stan is a one of a kind.

I'm sure there will be players who will win a slam or two in the 30's , but to peak at the age doesn't really make much sense. You have all of your 20's to peak and play your best tennis , as shown by 99% of the players , from the 80's-90's guys, to Federer , Djokovic and Nadal. 20 something Federer, Djokovic, and Nadal were just ridiculous players and what we imagine when we picture them in our heads. From 25 yr old Ballerina / Speed Demon Federer, whipping forehands down the line and running top spin lobs for a jumping overhead winner. Or Nadal playing a 60 point rally to hit a banana forehand outside the court. Or Djokovic hugging the baseline and just dominating the ground game and bossing the opponent on return.

Not saying that none of them don't do this today, but they certainly aren't peaking now in 30's , in comparison to mid twenties.

The fact that mid twenties Stan was good, but not great is baffling.

I just pulled up the Wikipedia for him 2008-2012

By reaching the final of the Masters Series event in Rome, Wawrinka entered the top 10 for the first time. He lost in the final to Novak Djokovic, despite taking the opening set.

In the Olympics, Wawrinka teamed with Roger Federer in men's doubles. They beat the favoured Americans Bob and Mike Bryan in the semifinals in straight sets; then in the final, defeated Simon Aspelin and Thomas Johansson of Sweden in four sets to win the gold medal.

Wawrinka reached the fourth round of the US Open, where British player Andy Murray defeated him in straight sets.

Wawrinka lost to Rafael Nadal in the fourth round at the Miami Masters in Key Biscayne. Nadal came from behind in both sets to beat Wawrinka in two tie-breaks.

At the Monte-Carlo Masters, Wawrinka defeated No. 2 Roger Federer in straight sets, an upset which halted the chance of a fourth straight Nadal-Federer final in Monte Carlo.

At the French Open Wawrinka defeated Nicolas Devilder in five sets and Nicolás Massú in straight sets. He lost to Nikolay Davydenko in the third round in four sets.

At Wimbledon, in the third round he defeated 21-year-old Jesse Levine, who had upset Marat Safin in the first round.[14] The Sunday Times reviewed Wawrinka's performance in the match by opining that he is "a strange player, clearly talented but short of match fitness and as clumsy on court as Federer is graceful."[15] Wawrinka was defeated by Andy Murray in five sets in the fourth round. The match was also a debut usage of the new roof on Centre Court and was the latest match at Wimbledon, lasting until 22:37 GMT.[16][17]

Wawrinka played in the Davis Cup tie with Italy and won in his first match against Andreas Seppi in straight sets.[18]

Wawrinka started his 2010 season by reaching the final of the Chennai Open, losing to Marin Čilić in two tie-breaks. This was Wawrinka's fifth consecutive loss in an ATP final. He reached the third round at the Australian Open, losing to Čilić again. Wawrinka returned to the ATP Tour at the Sony Ericsson Open after his wife gave birth to their daughter. He defeated Kevin Anderson, before losing to Mikhail Youzhny in the third round. He started his clay-court season in Casablanca at the 2010 Grand Prix Hassan II. After receiving a first-round bye, he defeated Slovakian qualifier Martin Kližan in the second round. In the quarterfinals, he defeated wildcard Reda El Amrani in straight sets. In the semifinals, he defeated Italian Potito Starace in three sets to advance to his second ATP final of 2010. In the final, he defeated Romanian Victor Hănescu in straight sets to win his second ATP Tournament. With this tournament win, he snapped a five-match losing streak in ATP finals and a 3½-year title drought. It was also the first professional singles final Wawrinka won, as his previous ATP victory occurred due to a retirement.

Wawrinka serves during his upset win versus Andy Murray at the 2010 US Open.
Wawrinka serves during his upset win versus Andy Murray at the 2010 US Open
Wawrinka became the 13th seed at the Monte-Carlo Masters and defeated Victor Hănescu in the first round in a rematch of the Casablanca final. He then beat Latvian Ernests Gulbis to advance to the third round. He was defeated by Novak Djokovic. Wawrinka reached the quarterfinals in Rome, losing to Rafael Nadal, and the semifinals in Belgrade, losing to John Isner. At the French Open, where he was the 20th seed, he reached the fourth round without dropping a set, defeating Jan Hájek in the first round. In the second round, he defeated German Andreas Beck, and in the third round, he beat Italian Fabio Fognini, before losing to Roger Federer in the fourth round.

After an unsuccessful grass season, where he lost in the first round of Wimbledon, Wawrinka separated from his coach since childhood and hired Peter Lundgren, former coach of Marat Safin and Federer. The partnership with Lundgren showed its benefits in the US Open, where Wawrinka reached the quarterfinals, beating fourth seed Andy Murray along the way.

Wawrinka started off 2011 by defeating No. 6 Tomáš Berdych along the way to claiming the Chennai Open crown. Wawrinka beat Xavier Malisse in the final in three sets. He advanced to the quarterfinals of the 2011 Australian Open, after defeating Andy Roddick in three sets to set up an all-Swiss quarterfinal with Roger Federer, which he lost in straight sets. He also came back from two sets and a break down to defeat Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in the third round of the French Open, before being defeated by Federer once more. Wawrinka was defeated by Simone Bolelli in the second round of Wimbledon and Donald Young at the same stage of the US Open.[19]

In September, Wawrinka announced that he had parted ways with Lundgren. He played the rest of the season without a coach.[20]

At the Swiss Indoors tournament, Wawrinka made it to the semifinals, after defeating Florian Mayer in the quarterfinals. In an all-Swiss semifinal, he was defeated by Roger Federer in straight sets.

Wawrinka started the season in Chennai, where he made the quarterfinals, before being defeated by Go Soeda.

At the Australian Open, he made it to the third round, defeating Benoît Paire and Marcos Baghdatis, before being eliminated by Nicolás Almagro.

In his Davis Cup tie against Mardy Fish in February, he lost in five sets. Later in February, he traveled to Buenos Aires and Acapulco, where he made to the semifinals, before losing again to Almagro and Fernando Verdasco, respectively.

In Monte Carlo, he defeated three Spaniards, Feliciano López, Pablo Andújar, and Almagro, making it to the quarterfinals before losing to another Spaniard, No. 2 Rafael Nadal, the eventual champion. In doubles, he teamed with Victor Troicki, and they made it to the quarterfinals.

In Estoril, he made it to the semifinals, but was defeated by Juan Martín del Potro.

Wawrinka made the fourth round of the French Open after defeating Flavio Cipolla, Andújar, and Gilles Simon. He was defeated by Jo-Wilfried Tsonga in the fourth round, once again coming from two sets down to take the match into a fifth set and recovering a 4–1 deficit in the decider before Tsonga finally prevailed. [21]

Wawrinka then had a series of first-round exits at Wimbledon, Gstaad, and in the Summer Olympics, where he lost to the eventual gold medallist Andy Murray. He was the flag bearer of Switzerland during the Summer Olympics Parade of Nations.[22] He teamed with Roger Federer again in doubles at the Olympics, but they were eliminated in the second round.[23]

He made the semifinals of the Masters 1000 event in Cincinnati, before he was defeated by Federer, the eventual champion. Wawrinka again also played doubles with Jarkko Nieminen, and they were eliminated in the second round.

At the US Open, Wawrinka reached the fourth round, but was forced to retire in his match against second seed Novak Djokovic due to illness.
Then all of the sudden 2013 hits and he is a monster. 2014 onward is history. Real baffling.
 

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Ferrer was also peaking after his 28th birthday for four seasons.
His peak was not as high as Stan's though, but he was also entering masters semis & finals regularly, not just at slams as Stan.
 

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Ferrer was also peaking after his 28th birthday for four seasons.
His peak was not as high as Stan's though, but he was also entering masters semis & finals regularly, not just at slams as Stan.
Ferrer did make Masters Cup final in 2007 that said.
 

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justice for all
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Ive never seen a guy or girl who looks like Wawrinka so yes, he is very unique
Someone once said to me I resembled him Wawrinka. But I thought that was nonsense. On the other hand I'd gladly trade my BH for his.
 

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Stan has balls of steel. He beat peak dull at AO and peak DJ at RG and also AO. He also shouldve been DJ at AO 13. Plus he beat DJ at USO twice.

I respect Stan a lot. Yes hes unique and one who changed tennis history. forever.
He beat Djokovic in QF (in the virtual sixth set) & then Nadal in AO'14 F, and Federer & then Djokovic in RG'15 F i.e. 2 x Big3 double, although both times he had a considerable advantage over Djokovic, at AO he got two virtual w/o's in 1R & 3R, and in RG Djokovic played three days in the row due to SF 5-setter vs Murray i.e. was not really physically ready for an excruciating bo5 RG final, as Thiem this RG vs Nadal after two-day SF 5-setter vs Djokovic..
 

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Wawrinka's mission is to stop Novak at slams. Without Stan Novak would've had 18-20 slams by now, and Stan made Novak's quest to GOAT much more difficult than Nadal and Federer.
 

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clearly yes....otherwise everyone would be asking "which stan wawrinka are you talking about?"

But as far as being a late bloomer.....have you heard of Víctor Estrella Burgos? There are definitely other late bloomers. In an era where very few people have won grand slams Wawrinka is the late bloomer to win grand slams, but given there are other late bloomers it is only a matter of time until the next late bloomer wins a slam
 

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Every human being is one of a kind and unique in their own way.
 

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Yes I can't think of another like him. Not only to peak but to reach such a level as to deny three ATGs several Slams. If you go way back, Jaroslav Drobny won all 3 of his Slams after the age of 29 but that was a different world.
 

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If by leaving family for an at the time minor? Then no, prob plenty. In tennis world he is the only one though.
 

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You could already see he was underachieving massively when he was younger. In 2007 and 2008 he had some decent results, reaching the TOP 10 and being finalist in Rome, I expected him to continue growing but he entered a slump in 2009-2012. I remember thinking and commenting he should be having results like Tsonga, Berdych and Soderling and being mentioned in that tier of player given the resemblance in style and potential, but he was way below them pre-2013. I never imagined he'd end up having a better career than the three of them put together. I attended one of his matches in Buenos Aires circa 2010/2011 and since it was in one of the outside courts I was only three meters away from him basically. Probably the best player I watched here bar Nadal.
 

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You could already see he was underachieving massively when he was younger. In 2007 and 2008 he had some decent results, reaching the TOP 10 and being finalist in Rome, I expected him to continue growing but he entered a slump in 2009-2012. I remember thinking and commenting he should be having results like Tsonga, Berdych and Soderling and being mentioned in that tier of player given the resemblance in style and potential, but he was way below them pre-2013. I never imagined he'd end up having a better career than the three of them put together. I attended one of his matches in Buenos Aires circa 2010/2011 and since it was in one of the outside courts I was only three meters away from him basically. Probably the best player I watched here bar Nadal.
Agreed I got to watch Stanimal in full flow about 8ft away and it wasn one of the top experiences of my tennis watching career.

It's so hard not to root for him. His game is super relatable as are his struggles. Watching him hit a one handed backhand down the line inspired me to start doing it and I'm a two handed player.
 

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justice for all
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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
But as far as being a late bloomer.....have you heard of Víctor Estrella Burgos? There are definitely other late bloomers. In an era where very few people have won grand slams Wawrinka is the late bloomer to win grand slams, but given there are other late bloomers it is only a matter of time until the next late bloomer wins a slam
I agree there are many more late bloomers. I’d even say the number of late bloomers has been increasing in the last 10 years or so hence my question about Stan. That definitely must have something to do with the improved longevity of the players.
 
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