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So i went back 6 pages of GM threads, (that's a long way back in terms of GM, dug quite a bit of dirt) and did an advanced forum search, even though my memory kept on saying that this article had already been posted. In the end i was convinced by the hard evidence it hadn't...So....here it is. (yes enough of my babbling)

nacciyar first posted it at rf.com, and so i went to tennis.com to check it out.link: http://www.tennis.com/features/general/features.aspx?id=127724

Overall i think it's an analytical approach to this issue. But tennis.com does tend to jump the bandwagon and suddenly come up with colourful charts for this issue.:eek:

btw, this is not an attempt to bash Nole, it's been done enough in some other threads. I think it's about time GM had at least a little more sensible approach to this issue.:)

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Retiring Types: How often the top men quit a match

"Typical," went the reaction to Nikolay Davydenko and Novak Djokovic's recent retirements against Roger Federer. But were they? We took the raw data and used it to draw some rough conclusions.

Click here for a calculation of where the top men and women stood in this category 14 months ago. (Note: criteria varies slightly)

By Kamakshi Tandon


Roger Federer’s aura of invincibility may have been fading fast, but over the past week and a half he’s quite literally recovered some of it by default. Three times he's faced his nearest challengers in the rankings, and twice they've handed him victory.

First came Nikolay Davydenko, who quit with a leg injury in the Estoril final. He had lost the first set in a tiebreak and was up a break in the second set. Then in Monte Carlo last week, Novak Djokovic stopped after going down a set and a break to Federer in the semifinals.

The retirements attracted particular attention for two reasons. One was timing: neither involved a mid-match injury that made carrying on impossible. Davydenko still looked competitive in the match, while Djokovic was just a few games away from losing and seemed capable of playing till the end.


Here's how often the top 10 have retired during a match, compared to the amount of matches they've lost during their career. The total number of retirements is given in brackets.





* ATP main draw, Grand Slam and Davis Cup matches only. For the full data, see below.

The other was the players involved. Both Davydenko and Djokovic have acquired a reputation for dubious defaults in precisely such situations.
“I have a little injury and I can't finish the match,” Davydenko told the Estoril crowd, later assuring reporters that he would be ready to play at Monte Carlo in three days’ time.

Djokovic, who received a few boos from the crowd as he left the court on Saturday, made his problem sound even more tepid. “It’s a sore throat. I feel dizziness a little bit in the last three days,” he said afterwards. “I asked the doctor yesterday but he said I don't have nothing, which I really don't believe. I think he didn't give me the right diagnosis, obviously.

“But obviously when you're playing against the No. 1 player of the world, you get a lot of balls back and longer points, and I just couldn't get enough energy back after each point... the previous opponents were not that tough and I didn't have long rallies against the previous opponents like I had today.”

So were their actions typical? Yes and no. They've done it before, but it's hardly something they do all the time. They just do it a little more often than most, and a little more dramatically to boot.

The numbers show that Djokovic tends to retire more often than any other top-10 player, but just as significant is the fact that he chooses memorable occasions to do so. Three of his five retirements have come against either Federer or Nadal in the semifinals of big events. Those are also the only times he’s retired facing a big deficit in a match, suggesting he doesn’t want to give his biggest rivals a clean win when he’s unfit.

Most notorious is Djokovic’s French Open meeting with Nadal two years ago, when he pulled the plug after losing the first two sets but declared he felt he had been “in control” of the match. His retirement against the Spaniard at rain-hit Wimbledon last year was more understandable, given that he had played nine hours in the previous two days to defeat Lleyton Hewitt in four sets and Marcos Baghdatis in five. His other two retirements were attributed to the breathing difficulties that plagued him early on and were eventually fixed with corrective surgery.


Here's how often the top 10 have retired while significantly behind in a match, compared to the amount of matches they've lost during their career. The number of retirements while trailing is given in brackets.




* ATP main draw, Grand Slam and Davis Cup matches only. For the full data, see below.

At other times, however, Djokovic has shown he’s willing to fight through physical problems, starting with a cult match against Gael Monfils at the 2005 US Open when he huffed and puffed his way to victory in five dramatic sets. A gasping Djokovic called numerous injury timeouts during the match, including one during the late stages that delayed Monfils’ service game. Monfils later admitted he had gone cold during the break.
That match also established another damaging perception that clings to the Serb – a habit of calling the trainer during tough contests. “I think he’s a joke, you know, when it comes down to his injuries. The rules are there to be used, not abused,” said Federer after a Davis Cup match in 2006.

Along with James Blake, Federer is the only member of the top ten never to have retired during a match.

Richard Gasquet comes out second on both lists, which only adds to the hits he’s taken for showing a lack of toughness. Accusing of ducking a Davis Cup match with Andy Roddick a couple of weeks ago, he could instead do with the kind of performance he produced against Roddick at Wimbledon last year, coming from two sets and a break down to win their quarterfinal match.

Davydenko stands out for the sheer number of times he’s abandoned a contest, but his marathon schedule means he also plays (and loses) the most matches. He owns the most infamous retirement in men’s tennis, a 6-2, 3-6, 1-2 defeat in the second round of Sopot that made headlines when betting exchange Betfair voided all wagers on the match because of strange betting patterns. Happily for his sporting reputation but intriguingly for match-fixing theorists, a number of Davydenko’s main draw retirements have come when he was even or leading in the match.

Clearly something had to give when Djokovic and Davydenko met in a Davis Cup match earlier this month. And so it proved: Djokovic retired up two sets to one at 4-6, 3-6, 6-4, 0-0.

But while they’re high on the list of top-ten players, both fall short of some perennial offenders like Tommy Haas and Juan Martin del Potro, who have repeated retired a game or two away from losing a match. It’s tough to condemn either one too heartily given how many injuries they’ve had to content with, but still, reaching the finish line is clearly not one of their priorities.

Haas takes the cake for once retiring down 6-4, 5-0 to Andrei Pavel in Montreal because of a back injury which flared up during the first set. But it’s just as tricky not to start a match as it is to not finish it: he’s also taken flak for giving Federer walkovers in their past two meetings.

In del Potro’s case, a staggering one-fifth of his 40 career defeats have been unfinished matches, including perhaps the second-most famous retirement in men’s tennis - a 6-1, 3-1 loss to James Blake whose side-effects ended ATP’s experiment with round-robin events. The Argentine was earmarked as a future top-ten player before his physical frailties became obvious - if he ever does get there, he may end up making Djokovic look indefatigable.

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Interesting article. Nearly 10% of Novak's losses were by retirement, a very high figure. He and Gasquet both need to toughen up!

Blake and Federer never retired from a match :)
 

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Never heard of Laver, Lendl, McEnroe, Sampras or Agassi as regular quitters. All my respect for Fed for never retiring with all the pressure he got in recent years. In this department he's really in the same spirit as the greats.
Djoko will not change his spoiled junior attitude any time soon, all his tricks are tiresome, but it is good to have such a polarizing figure in the game.
 

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We had a similar thread way back a couple years or so (but not this article, either something similar - but before Djokovic's rise I think - or someone on here took the time to work out the stats). It was very interesting and I remember something that came up as an issue is why some of the retirements happen. The point was that if you fall mid-match and twist your ankle and can't go on, it's not quite the same as quitting with an upset stomach or even a sore something or other. Some of the players who've retired several times have almost unilaterally retired from one problem (i.e. ankle), while others seem to have all kinds of ailments. So to me, not all retirements are the same and it's hard to lump them all together
 

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Good article til the end when the facts start going wrong, its almost as if the end of the article was rushed.
 

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I could've swore there was a thread about retirements in GM too but I couldn't find it when I searched for it.

When you consider how many injuries Rafa takes on, it's amazing he doesn't retire more often. He refuses. Roger refuses to retire too, as long as he's standing on two good legs, he'll take the loss rather than retire. Djokovic owed him one from AO but Novak was not accomodating. :(p

That Blake has also never retired from a match is very impressive and somehow makes James an even more worthy top tenner in my eyes.

Kolya a joke with the retirements, nothing new there.
 

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Interesting. It seems Monofed is a real man who always fights, even if he faces difficulties, because every player has the health issues sometimes.
 

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Interesting take, but quite incomplete. Retirements through injury occuring mid-match are usually followed by the player in question missing some subsequent tournaments. Easy examples:

-PHM ret. vs. Verdasco, AO 2007.
-Berdych ret. vs. Davydenko, DC 2008.

Those should be accounted off separately from other retirements.
 

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I could've swore there was a thread about retirements in GM too but I couldn't find it when I searched for it.

When you consider how many injuries Rafa takes on, it's amazing he doesn't retire more often. He refuses. Roger refuses to retire too, as long as he's standing on two good legs, he'll take the loss rather than retire. Djokovic owed him one from AO but Novak was not accomodating. :(p

That Blake has also never retired from a match is very impressive and somehow makes James an even more worthy top tenner in my eyes.

Kolya a joke with the retirements, nothing new there.
Yeah, I don't remember who started it or what it was called but this thread gives me all kinds of deja vu :lol: It's interesting but like I said, some guys are just lucky. I've never seen Fed or Blake kill an ankle mid-match like certain players do - maybe it's b/c they're such good movers or it's just the way they move that they don't jerk back and forth as much but there are some players on that list who have never retired for things like upset stomach or a sore leg who are being compared to the Davydenkos and Djokovics and it just doesn't seem that informational when it's all just bunched together.
Interesting take, but quite incomplete. Retirements through injury occuring mid-match are usually followed by the player in question missing some subsequent tournaments. Easy examples:

-PHM ret. vs. Verdasco, AO 2007.
-Berdych ret. vs. Davydenko, DC 2008.

Those should be accounted off separately from other retirements.
Yes, this is exactly what I mean. To just look at the brute numbers shows nothing valuable.
 

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Very nice! Statistics like that can always be biased, but this one seems to be pretty close to the impression I have of certain players. No surprise Djokovic tops the list.
 

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Taken from Number Crunching: The Retiring Type
http://www.tennis.com/features/general/features.aspx?id=70254


An astonishing 11.4% of Jelena Jankovic’s total career defeats are retirements while losing – that’s more than one in every nine losses.
Another Serb sitting on top of the retirements list. I'm convinced now that strategic medical time-outs and retiring-white-losing are actually taught to young Serb players. :tape:

Retiring during a match doesn’t just affect the player, but the crowd and the opponent as well. “There are definitely players that are retiring so that the opponent doesn’t get the satisfaction of really beating them,” said John Lloyd, British Davis cup captain and former Australian Open finalist. “I did it early in my career too, not with retiring but through tanking. It’s a similar thing: I was messing around and it was obvious to the opponent that I wasn’t taking it seriously, so he didn’t get the satisfaction of beating me. It’s the same with retiring – you don’t want to give the opponent the satisfaction of actually beating you.”
This might explain why Novak retires often against Roger and Rafa. Or maybe Novak wanted to stick it to Roger for tainting his AO win after it was leaked that Roger had mono.

But even the Serbs can't top Justin Henin's disgraceful retirement at the AO final two years ago. I hope everybody took a lesson from her and said to themselves, "I'll never be like that."
 

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I believe Federer has the record of most matches played without a retirement. There are a few people with more games then he has with only one or two retirements, so he hasn't assured himself of the record yet. But he must be very close.
 

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Another Serb sitting on top of the retirements list. I'm convinced now that strategic medical time-outs and retiring-white-losing are actually taught to young Serb players. :tape:
Yeah, that's interesting, although it's important to acknowledge that the other top Serb, Ivanovic, has no retirements.

And I guess if you're going to point on that the Serbs tend to retire a lot, it's interesting to note that the Swiss, Federer, Hingis, and Schnyder, have practically no retirements between them.
 
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