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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
How high do you think you'd have to be ranked to make a living playing tennis professionall? Of course, your endorsement for your equipment and from sponsors is likely to affect your chance. How popular the sport is in your country is another factor, so your nationality also plays a part. So all things considered, how successful do you have to be to have a career as a pro tennis player?

In my country, it's very difficult to make a living as a tennis player. You'd have to be ranked withint the top 300 in the world to get attention from sponsors. Of course, the younger you are, the better chance you have to get support from sponsors. Your looks plays a part as well. If you're good looking like Kei Nishikori, it defintiely helps attract attention from the media and public. If Kei were not so good looking, he wouldn't have received nearly as much endorsement money as he has over the years. But all in all, in Japan, you're unlikely to make a living for years as a tennis player unless you can stay within the top 300 in the ranking consistently. Otherwise, you'd have to take on other jobs like coaching and sometimes non-tennis related jobs.
 

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Discussion Starter #2
So what about in your countries?
 

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People keep banging about how the 2000th best football player earn a lot more than the 100th tennis players or something along the lines, they fail to realise tennis is an individual sport and there is barely any exposure to the players that are ranked over 200.

I think top 300 should earn enough for a living, over that it is very questionable..
 

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Only players who have been in the top 150. I know this as some Irish ranked 150-300 had to retire
 
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I'd say top 200... challengers and future direct entries... top 300 I believe the earnings just break even with accomodation and travel cost.
 

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Challenger guys are probably making as much as an entry level office job.

Future guys are barely making it.

Top 150 might be making profit,

Top 100 can make 6 figures.

Top 50 can make 6 figure plus depending.

Top 30 can reach the million mark.

Top 10 are millionaires.

Djokovic and Nadal could buy an island.

Fededer is on his way to becoming a billionaire....

Tennis skill wise, its probably a 5-10 percent difference from #200 and #15, but thats enough to be flying first class with your physio, coach , manager etc, vs. Eating McDonald's at your Motel 8 and being passed off at losing R2 at challenger qualifier....

Ik exaggerating, but you get my point.
 

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People keep banging about how the 2000th best football player earn a lot more than the 100th tennis players or something along the lines, they fail to realise tennis is an individual sport and there is barely any exposure to the players that are ranked over 200.

I think top 300 should earn enough for a living, over that it is very questionable..
There's also way more football players than tennis players, meaning it might be harder to be top 2000 in football than top 300 in tennis
 

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I've spent 15 years running these numbers. This is for the US:

One year on tour expenses, $25-$30k. This is WITHOUT a coach or fitness trainer. This includes hotels, gas, entry, equipment, food, supplements, registrations, insurance, car repairs, 6 months rent for a place in Florida and 6 months on the road in hotels. This number falls between 25-30k/year, playing 25-30 events, 20-25 futures, and 5-10 pre-qualies and other National/Section prize money events.

In order to be able to break even, you have to be around 350-400 in the world. This is pre-tax. But if you are smart about it, you can incorporate yourself as a business and write off expenses. Anytime you can get into a tournament that offers lodging, that is $80-$100 saved per night instead of spending it in a hotel.

So roughly you gotta be about #350 in the world to break even. As said before previously, any tournaments including lodging can save you money, any airbnb you can save dozens of dollars per night and that adds up, any lessons you can give on the road at some local club or any league money matches you can win can all add up to that $30k magic number you need to break even.

#350-#250 you can turn a little profit. #250 and above you can make some money because you can get into slam qualies. But the higher level you get to, the more important it is to have a team, coach and physio mainly. So that extra profit you make up to #250 would be wisely spent on a team.

Finally above #250 you can be a real pro, with a team and turning a profit, though it is always difficult and never guaranteed. And if you get injured at any time, forget it. #250-#100 is the big time, where guys can make that jump from barely turning a profit to beginning to think about flying to play on other continents. #100 and above you can start to buy a house/car, top #50 you are a made man

Of course all this is assuming you are are strict on your diet and your finances as me. If you live any sort of real luxury, you will be in the red
 

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In 2017, the 170th ranked player on the money list made $200,000 in prize money (combined singles and doubles).

So I’d say given all the expenses involved in tennis, you’d need to be top 200 or you are losing money while playing (or barely breaking even).
 
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