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Discussion Starter #41
I couldn't handle that article: full of shade. I just skipped through it and saw a factual mistake: she claims Novak is seeded 4, when he is seeded 1. She calles Novak's team "platoon". I call it "Team Pretty" :lol:

I thought I would get used to the shade and negativity, but I don't. It's so off putting.

Novak needs to shut them all up and win this thing.

I love Agassi going with Novak: can you imagine the adulation he would be getting if he had said YES to the other top players who asked him? We know one of them was Murray, I think the other was Roger, before he hired Ljubicic, but we'll never know. Yet, he decided to say YES to Novak. He's doing the right thing and following his heart, as he himself said. May they be the most successful pair ever. :yippee: :yippee:
Actually I love the fact that it's actually Steffie who convinced Andre to work with Novak. Only a GOAT can see the potential of another GOAT :lol:
 

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Good luck to Novak tomorrow!! :cheerleader:

On Court 1, rain predicted, new opponent. Novak needs to stay focused to work out Pavlasek's serve. Not get frustrated if there is bad weather.His match is the first. In less than 8 hours. Can't wait. :bounce:
 

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Is that Ancic? I barely recognize him

There's also a video of them practising together (in ESPN)
Wimbledon - Novak Djokovic tweaks coaching staff ahead of Wimbledon
Yes, it's Ancic. Novak added him on coaching team along with Agassi during the fortnight in Wimbledon. I hope this addition will bring him a fruitful result afterwards 0:)0:)0:)

P.s: It's great to see Ancic on court even when he's just coaching, not playing. He is the most charming player on court methinks. :x:x:x
 

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Wimbledon R2: Novak Djokovic df. Adam. Pavlásek 6-2 6-2 6-1. An easy win for our boy against the new opponent. In this match, we can see that Novak is more often to play on net, he used more slices and drop shots than he did in the past, maybe it is the clearest influence from Ancic.

Hope this cooperation bring the good result.
 

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Discussion Starter #46
Wimbledon - Novak Djokovic lets his play deliver message that he's not tennis' Tiger Woods

Novak Djokovic sending message that he's not tennis' Tiger Woods
play
Novak Djokovic says he isn't bothered by John McEnroe's comments comparing his struggles with those of Tiger Woods. (2:47)
5:17 AM WIB
Kurt Streeter
ESPN Senior Writer

LONDON -- Ah, 2017, the year of the unimaginable and unexpected in men's tennis. First, Roger Federer, positively geriatric at 35, plays what he later describes as perhaps "the best 20 minutes" of his tennis career to win an epic final at the Australian Open. Then Rafael Nadal, 31, thought to be on the creaky-kneed downslope, rekindles his old form, conquers the European clay and rips his way to a 10th French Open.

And what of Novak Djokovic?

Who?

Djokovic, remember him? The Gumby-esque Serb who, prior to the past year, had been the steady and dominant force on the men's tour since 2011. Djokovic, three-time Wimbledon champion -- at his metronomic best, virtually unbeatable.

The 30-year-old is the No. 2 seed at Wimbledon this summer, judged by the fastidious wiseheads to have the second-best chance to hoist a fourth winner's trophy once the last ball has been struck. But other than the loose chatter about his personal life, or talk of the star-crossed changes among his coaching team, Djokovic is as overlooked a second seed as you'll ever see at a tennis Grand Slam. Given the considerable lack of buzz, you'd be forgiven for thinking he's seeded 22nd.

The thinking about Djokovic's chances, indeed about his future, has changed as fast as the many screaming down-the-line backhands he struck Thursday on a muggy Court 1. From the first ball it seemed more like a glorified practice than a real test. No surprise: 22-year-old Adam Pavlasek, a young Czech playing his second Wimbledon match, grew up idolizing Djokovic and couldn't seem to shake himself from nerve-induced idol worship.

Djokovic feasted on a steady diet of moderately spun, moderately paced groundstrokes. This wasn't a match, it was batting practice: 6-2, 6-2, 6-1. Pavlasek's game allowed the Serb to find an unhurried, comfortable, settled-down feeling. It should be remembered that when Djokovic feels that way -- settled and rhythmic -- he is as intimidating a force as the game has ever seen.

We tend to forget just how grindingly good, how suffocating Djokovic can be. We get lost in the worship of the now. We focus on the resurgent Federer and Nadal -- or last year's Wimbledon champion, Andy Murray.

Djokovic was upset in the third round last year at Wimbledon -- the earliest he'd fallen here since 2008. After that, he suffered defeat in the US Open final and the ATP Championship final, lost his grip on the No. 1 ranking, was upset early at the Australian Open, and walked meagerly from the court after a quarterfinal thrashing at the French, suffering through a 6-0 last-set loss to Belgium's Dominic Thiem.

A slump. True. A significant one. This past year, Djokovic has struggled through the equivalent of a midlife tennis crisis -- wavering, doubting himself, dogged by talk of unspecified personal woes that he has only obliquely addressed.

So, now, in a digitally primed world that changes at speeds and in ways we could never have previously imagined, a few months of existential angst suddenly casts the game's most dominant player as permanently damaged goods.

Hence, the back and forth at Wimbledon on Wednesday: Quoted in the Daily Mail, legend John McEnroe compared Djokovic -- who despite the woes had just won a Wimbledon tuneup, and whose 2017 record now stands at 30-7 -- with the struggling and quite likely done-with-golf Tiger Woods. "When he [Woods] had the issues with his wife and then he seemed to go completely off the rails and has never been even close to being the same player. So we're starting to say: 'Wait a minute, is this possible with him [Djokovic]?'"

Asked about the comments after Thursday's match, Djokovic declined to get climb into the muck. "John has a complete right to say -- anybody, really, in the world -- has a right to say what they want, and I respect that right. ... He's somebody that has earned that right because of who he is and what he has meant to the sport. ... I really don't take it in a negative way. ... I don't necessarily need to agree with it, but it's his right."

In professional tennis, the top players once seemed to live a much more self-reliant existence. Now, even among the middle ranks, it's all about the coaches and the co-coaches and the physical trainers and the strategy consultants, plus various other assorted agents and hangers-on. It's about the "support team" -- and no doubt the lanky Serb's changes in that area provide a real area of intrigue.

Longtime coach Marian Vajda was canned. After a successful three years, Boris Becker was kicked to the curb. Over the past year, Djokovic steadily shed his longtime backers. He sought solace in a controversial tennis coach who few on tour had ever heard of, Pepe Imaz -- a long-locked Spaniard who has spoken more about love and peace than the single-minded, kill-or-be-killed thirst to win.

Andre Agassi, untested as a coach, and often absent from the game since his 2006 retirement, now sits in Djokovic's box as his coach. More than any other living tennis player, Agassi knows about winning Slams when you're a big but overlooked name.

Twenty-five summers ago, Agassi came to Wimbledon as a man overlooked, a player ready to be discarded. Just a few weeks prior he'd suffered a straight-sets drubbing in the semifinals of the French Open courtesy of Jim Courier. Agassi had been one of the game's dominant players for years, yet he had never gone past the quarterfinals at Wimbledon, had skipped the tournament multiple times, and had lost the three Grand Slam finals he'd previously reached. Tennis' frosted flake, he was dubbed, alluding to the perception that he would wilt ingloriously under pressure -- and that he didn't have his life together off the court.

At Wimbledon that warm English summer, Agassi surprised everyone by producing one of the most stunning runs in the tournament's 131 years. He marched to the final, beating McEnroe easily in the semis, and then beating Goran Ivanisevic in a five-set thriller to win the first of his eight Grand Slams. Today, remarkably, Agassi is viewed as a former champion who has his life, and his priorities, in clear and focused perspective.

Djokovic certainly appeared clear and focused in his postmatch press conference Thursday. He spoke, as he has at every opportunity here, about loving the game and playing for the pure passion of it. He pondered his career over the past six years -- the highs and the lows and the costs -- with an introspection Agassi would approve of.

"When you're winning, your ego, your confidence is high," Djokovic said. "Everything is functioning well. Why would you change anything? [There were] many times, in the course of the last couple of years where I was going against the signals of my own body, where I was probably needing to take a break or rest or maybe skip a certain tournament. I wasn't doing it."

Then came the last 12 months. The buzz is gone. Expectations are dimmed. There's worry he will never be the same. "The interest rate and the payment," he said, "came later."
:lol: what's with these journalists and their shades?
 

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Journos are vile, but Novak taught them a lesson in manners and class. Agassi confronted McEbroe and let's hope they'll behave better.

Novak's win today was very good. Very focused, he was. Now Mannarino. I am furious at the scheduling.. Novak is scheduled last on Court !, with rain in the forecast. He may not finish his match and then will be tired for his QF match,, having played 2 days in a row. In the meantime, Murray and federer have not left CC.

TSome claim it's because MUrray's #1. Last year Novak was #1, double defending champion, proud holder of all 4 slams: he still was sent to Court 1. Some people are embarrased at this blatant unfairness.

But to be sent to Court 1 TWICE when Roger and Murray not even once is beyond the pale.

So much disrespect. Rafa was also sent to Court 1.

Novak will have to lump it and win the whole thing, to teach the bastards a lesson.

:lol:
 

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Discussion Starter #48
@Yolita Champion always prevails against all odds. I hope Novak does it this time :)
Last year he defeated Mannarino before crumbling to you know who. I hope this year the favor shines on him
 

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It was a bad schedule for Nole when having to play on Court 1 again with some rain in forecast. But it's ok, he can handle everything because he is a real champion. One day, the organizer will know how wrong they are when treating bad to Nole.

Come on Nole.
 

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I like what I see in Novak: he's pumped on court, happy and relaxed off court.

They can protect the local boys all they want. It will make Nole's victory even sweeter.

:)

And when I say local boys, I mean it: one by birth, the other by adoption. :D
 

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Discussion Starter #51
https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2017/jul/08/novak-djokovic-passion-wimbledon-ernests-gulbis

Novak Djokovic’s passion and precision return in win over Ernests Gulbis

• Former world No1 wins 6-4, 6-1, 7-6 (2) on Centre Court
• ‘Every match that I’ve played, I felt very comfortable’
Kevin Mitchell at Wimbledon
Saturday 8 July 2017 20.41 BST Last modified on Sunday 9 July 2017 00.15 BST

The sun is shining again on Novak Djokovic. After a year of turmoil, personal and professional, he is back where he belongs: the second week of Wimbledon for the 10th time and looking dangerous.

For too long now, the former world No1 has struggled to convince observers who are not members of his inner sanctum that all was well away from the court – or on it, for that matter – but there was very little wrong with his tennis on Saturday when he tamed the stuttering genius of Ernests Gulbis in two hours and 11 minutes on Centre Court, 6-4, 6-1, 7-6 (2).

“It was the first time I saw the passion back,” his former coach Boris Becker said. “Ultimately it’s about passion, how much you want to win. He wants to win desperately.”

Memories of his unexpectedly early exit at the hands of the American Sam Querrey here last year are fading by the day as Djokovic rediscovers the verve and precision that marks him out from his peers.

He said: “I’m delighted with the performance. I raised the level of tennis compared with the first couple of matches. It was the most focused I was on court.

“Gulbis presents a great challenge, because he is so unpredictable and has a big serve. Winning eight games in a row gave me a lot of confidence.”

Djokovic next plays the French left-hander Adrian Mannarino, who beat his compatriot and 15th seed, Gaël Monfils, 7-6 (3), 4-6, 5-7, 6-3, 6-2 in three hours and 29 minutes out on Court 12. Mannarino, the world No51 who has struggled to make a definitive breakthrough on the Tour and has a 33-24 record on grass, will not only be tired but perhaps also a little overawed when facing the three-time champion.

However, the Serb, who declares his priorities have shifted towards a search for personal tranquillity under the guidance of his life coach, Pepe Imaz, was unusually short-tempered even before battle had been properly engaged. In the third game, he demanded the referee, Jake Garner, be focused after what he perceived were a couple of poor calls – then paid for his own distraction when a Gulbis forehand flew beyond his reach for the first break of the match.

“He’s doing the best he can, and I am too,” Djokovic said of the official. “At moments you get frustrated. I apologise to him.”

The incident roused him sufficiently to get his head back on straight and he steadily chipped away at his opponent’s occasionally fragile psyche.

When Gulbis had his most impressive run in a slam, at Roland Garros in 2014, he blazed all the way to the semi-finals – where he ran into Djokovic and the fire went out like a snuffed candle. Djokovic had reason to put his foot on the pedal with extra venom that day, Gulbis having the previous year labelled Djokovic, Roger Federer, Rafael Nadal and Andy Murray as boring for their lack of forthrightness.

But the volatile shot-maker has not had the right sort of ammunition to make such claims since, suffering injuries to back, shoulder, right wrist and left calf over the past couple of seasons and he was helpless to stop his ranking tumbling to 589 in the world. He entered with a protected ranking of 99, but looked good for it with impressive three-set wins in the first two rounds, against Víctor Estrella Burgos for the loss of four games, then the 29th seed and former slam champion Juan Martín del Potro.

So, here they were again in a slam, the extrovert Gulbis and the complex Djokovic, although the dynamic had changed a little. Gulbis will tell anyone who listens that his desire to break back into the top 10 is genuine, that he has left behind his childish ways and tantrums – and maybe even the keys to the private jet that comes with being the son of the fourth richest man in Latvia.

There was little he could do when the second seed struck back to level at 4-4. Gulbis entered the fray with 38 aces, 10th on the tournament list – adding five in the first half hour – and was tied for six in speed on 137mph. But Djokovic soaked up his serving menace impressively to take the first set.

When he broke the Latvian for a third time at the start of the second, the match was taking on the feel of their Parisian encounter three years ago. In that match, Gulbis had a mid-match burst of inspiration, winning the third set, before Djokovic sprang into life to seal the fifth of six wins over him.

His seventh in eight matches was angst-free. A fifth Gulbis double-fault handed him a break to love for 4-0 in the second. When Djokovic wrapped up the set for the loss of a single game, the writing was not so much on the wall as all over town.

Gulbis had the trainer on before the start of the third. But he did not flinch from his increasingly hopeless task; while nine others in the draw have surrendered to their physical failings – Dudi Sela the latest of them on Saturday – Gulbis soldiered on to force a tie-break. Among the 28-year-old’s last contributions was a long and plaintive yell of despair as the points and the match leaked away, ending with an over-cooked forehand.

Gulbis gave all he had but, for all that he stretched Djokovic in sporadic rushes of inspiration, they remain some way apart when it matters in big matches.

‘The passion is back’
Commenting on the observation by his former coach Boris Becker, who said during his TV commentary on the Serb’s 6-4, 6-1, 7-6 (2) win on Centre Court that he could “see the passion back”, Djokovic said: “We’ve been through ups and downs, both of us … Boris knows me very well. So he’s right when he says that the passion is back. I’ve been feeling better on the court the last couple of months - but especially on the grass court this season. Every match that I’ve played, I felt very comfortable. When you’re playing well, you’re feeling well and you’re even more motivated, passionate to see how far it can take you.”

Djokovic corroborated the gathering locker-room sentiment that the courts have suffered from the heat of the first week, but he did not consider they were dangerous.

“The first two matches I didn’t see any significant difference,” he said before his fourth-round match against the French left-hander Adrian Mannarino, who took five sets to beat his compatriot Gaël Monfils.

“But I was hearing a lot of comments from the other players. They were complaining. Especially on the outside courts. Today I could see there is a difference in grass, in the turf itself. It was a bit softer, especially a couple of feet inside and outside, around the baseline area.

“I haven’t had that kind of experience before in Wimbledon, to be honest. The courts are always perfect here. Obviously, grass is a very demanding surface for maintenance. Weather conditions can affect the quality of the grass, I would assume.

“The more you play on it, the worse it is, obviously. You don’t have as much grass already now at the end of the first week. But I’m sure the groundsmen will try to do everything possible to make it playable for the athletes as much as they can in the second week. I’m sure they know what they’re doing.”

Had he felt physically vulnerable?

“No, I haven’t. I haven’t had that kind of feeling. It was more the bad bounces around the ... baseline. That’s where there were a lot of small different holes. It just felt a little bit different. But I didn’t feel in danger in terms of movement.”
 

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I like what I see in Novak: he's pumped on court, happy and relaxed off court.

They can protect the local boys all they want. It will make Nole's victory even sweeter.

:)

And when I say local boys, I mean it: one by birth, the other by adoption. :D
It is damn true Yolita. I hate it when the organizers of big tournaments try to protect Fedal while underestimating Novak. They forget that Novak is 12-time Grand Slam and 30-time master champion.
 

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Such ridiculous scheduling...Just win the whole damn thing and shove it up on the face of Murraytards and Fedtards,aka,Wimbledon organizers...
 

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Discussion Starter #54 (Edited)
Im not surprised, but still i find it disgusting.

And I dont know why I'm still posting in this forum, as days pass only hateful trolls remain. It used to be fun but today it's nothing but trash. TF is pretty much the same thing as MTF in terms of mocking and trolling, but it's still fun, I cannot pinpoint what makes the experience and atmosphere so much different here and there
 

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I know there are issues with scheduling,ground conditions etc..But I don't want him to go into a complaining mode..Just maintain your silence and let your racket do the talking...
 

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Discussion Starter #56
Daily mail is surprisingly not as trashy as usual in this article :lol:
Novak Djokovic beats Adrian Mannarino at Wimbledon | Daily Mail Online

Novak Djokovic accuses Wimbledon referees of making the wrong call after he was made to wait extra night to beat Adrian Mannarino in straight sets

- Novak Djokovic beat Adrian Mannarino 6-2 7-6 (7-5) 6-4 in fourth round
- Match was held over after Rafa Nadal's epic with Gilles Muller on Monday
- It was played under the centre Court roof because of rain showers
- No 2 seed Djokovic wasted little time in asserting his authority on the contest
- He called for the trainer because of a shoulder injury in the third set
- But the Serb had too much power for Mannarino as he moves into last eight

By Laura Williamson for the Daily Mail
PUBLISHED: 14:36, 11 July 2017 | UPDATED: 00:17, 12 July 2017

Novak Djokovic has accused Wimbledon referees of dithering and making the ‘wrong decision’ in postponing his fourth-round match against Adrian Mannarino from Monday evening.

The three-time champion also criticised the Centre Court playing surface, pointing out a hole in the grass and saying the conditions were ‘not great’, following his delayed 6-2, 7-6, 6-4 victory over the Frenchman.

Djokovic, 30, claimed the All England Club were ‘completely indecisive’ in taking two-and-a-half hours to tell him and Mannarino their last-16 match would not be moved to Centre Court, and called for Wimbledon to follow the US Open and adopt fifth-set tiebreaks to speed up proceedings.

The world No 4’s match was scheduled to follow Rafa Nadal’s four-hour 48-minute defeat by Gilles Muller on Court No 1, which finished at 8.33pm.

Centre Court was empty from around 7pm after Roger Federer’s straight-sets victory over Grigor Dimitrov, yet officials opted not to move the match owing to crowd safety concerns.

‘I was obviously unhappy not to play on Monday night,’ Djokovic said. ‘We were kept for two-and-a-half hours in the dark, in a way, without knowing what we are going to do. So you were on your toes warming up, cooling down. The referees’ office was completely indecisive.

‘I just think it was a wrong decision not to play us on Monday night, because we could have played. I think the last match on the Centre Court was done before 7pm. Having in mind that Centre Court has the roof and lights, we could have played till 11pm.

‘We went to the referees’ office before 8pm. There were security reasons. That was the only excuse, that basically was the explanation that we were getting. I just didn’t see any logic in not playing us on the Centre Court.

‘Should Wimbledon introduce fifth-set tiebreaks? I just don’t see any reason why not. If you are already getting to the six-all fifth set, you might as well decide it in a tiebreak. It is great drama, but that player has to go out tomorrow. It’s not really what your body’s looking for.’

The Serb, who will play Tomas Berdych in the quarter-finals on Wednesday, showed chair umpire Carlos Bernardes what he claimed was a hole in the grass on Centre Court.

Mannarino, far more used to competing on the outside courts, said Centre Court was not as ‘destroyed’ as others he had played on, but Djokovic was less impressed.

‘During the match I mentioned there was a hole in the middle of the court. The chair umpire just asked me to show him and I did. He was not very pleased to see that,’ he said.

‘The courts, honestly, are not that great and many players are feeling the same. The groundsmen are the best in the world and it’s not easy, but I’ve played on better courts.

‘The more you play on it, the worse it gets, unfortunately,’ he added.

Despite his multiple complaints, plus the need for treatment and a painkiller to ease a troublesome right shoulder in the third set, Djokovic rarely looked threatened against Mannarino, a left-hander ranked No 51 in the world.

The Serb attempted to shrug off his injury, saying only ‘it’s been something I’ve been dragging back and forth for a while’ and ‘pain is part of sport’. It did not seem to hamper him here, but we shall soon find out if all that time hanging around has taken a toll.
 

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Discussion Starter #57
My take from his performance yesterday:

- I hope the shoulder is nothing serious
- Novak screamed a little bit too much to my liking, but on the other hand it's a sign of hunger, so it's all good
- First three games were perfect from Novak. But then he reverted to his autoflight mode which was quite frustating to watch since he made too much UE, although in the end that was enough to finish Adrian
- As much as I want him to be not too critical towards the tournament (his detractors will see him as a whiner), his arguments do hold up and are reasonable
- OOT: I didnt remember that Mannarino is such a cutie :lol::hearts:
 

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Discussion Starter #58
I have never been so sad for Novak since that RG final defeat in 2015. I think he started the tournament well and it's so unfortunate that he had to finish it with an injury.

I really dont like frauderer, and it's almost like a punch in my gut that he will get to touch that Wimbledon trophy again. Oh well, it's only a sport in the end, and I shouldnt take it personally. Still it sucks...
 

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I read today that the Wimbledon final on Sunday had all time low ratings on ESPN among Wimbledon finals. 1.1. Previously, the lowest ratings were for Murray-Raonic, 1.5.

It serves them right, with the appalling way they used their scheduling powers to put Novak at a disadvantage with respect to his competitors.

Maybe his injury would flared up anyway, but maybe, if he had had a full day's rest, he would have been able to keep going. We will never know.

I was disgusted with the blatant way the Wimbledon organisers withheld a court. Novak was furious. He was kept all day there, warming up. waiting, cooling down, warming up again... Of course he yelled more than normal. :lol: And of course when one is tired, injuries are more likely to flare up.

Anyway: clearly they didn't want to risk another 2014 or 2015. Better safe than sorry.

Lowest ratings EVER for a Wimbledon final. :dance:

Who wants to watch a lame final? This is the first Wimbledon final I miss in almost 30 years. I am glad to know I wasn't the only one voting with my feet. :lol:

I hope Novak heals fully, I really miss watching him play in full flight.
 

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Discussion Starter #60
I hope Novak heals fully, I really miss watching him play in full flight.
Yeah me too. I feel like a fake fan, but I really dont feel like watching him when knowing he has no chance to win the tournament, like boy I have better things to do, so if you cant win dont even bother with my time :lol:

I dont know what ATP will do with Roger winning his 19th Slam. Nothing can be milked from this to be honest
 
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