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Feel free to ask them (if you ever a met a South Korean that is) how would they feel about moving up North and enjoying all the booms. :)
I'm sure many of their elderly would love to, as half of them live in poverty and are sometimes even forced into prostitution to survive. In the DPRK they would be taken care of. But that is the problem with capitalism, the individualistic selfish attitude that the system projects on its people. It's why you applaud capitalism because you live well under it, without caring about the two billion people who live in abject poverty under that same system.
I guess that's why North isn't in the top 100 by life expectancy and not even in top 120 by life expectancy at birth. South is top 10. In your own country's prisons you have free healthcare, education and housing, you lack the Internet (or maybe not?) and you can't travel much; sounds about right. :shrug:
Like I said, everything is easy when you are backed by the biggest super power. The DPRK was better off than the South for decades when there still was a Communist power block.
 

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I'm sure many of their elderly would love to, as half of them live in poverty and are sometimes even forced into prostitution to survive. In the DPRK they would be taken care of. But that is the problem with capitalism, the individualistic selfish attitude that the system projects on its people. It's why you applaud capitalism because you live well under it, without caring about the two billion people who live in abject poverty under that same system.
Like I said, everything is easy when you are backed by the biggest super power. The DPRK was better off than the South for decades when there still was a Communist power block.
What, there's no poverty over there? Surely you should know around 500k people died of hunger in the 90s - and that's the conservative estimate. And DPRK wasn't better off for decades, by the end of 60s at best, and mostly due to the natural resources they have a lot more of.
 

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What, there's no poverty over there? Surely you should know around 500k people died of hunger in the 90s - and that's the conservative estimate. And DPRK wasn't better off for decades, by the end of 60s at best, and mostly due to the natural resources they have a lot more of.
The North's growth was slowed down in the sixties when they sided with China in the Sino-Soviet split and the Soviets cut off aid, but the South only caught up economically in the mid-eighties. Especially impressive given that the North was almost entirely flattened by the most brutal bombing campaign in history during the Korean War and had to literally be rebuilt from the ground up. The DPRK was better off because the Communist block gave them trading partners, when that disappeared the economic sanctions from the West started hitting them massively, resulting in the infamous famine in the mid-nineties. Of course the West looked in delight at the sight of starving Koreans and didn't offer aid, hoping the regime would fall. No such luck as the country was built upon self-reliance rather than connecting itself to the fate of a bigger Communist power.

Laying aside the war years and the three-year period of recovery that followed, north Korea grew at a faster pace than the south from the 1940’s to the mid-60s. So impressed was Che Guevera after a visit to Pyongyang, he declared north Korea to be a model to which Cuba should aspire.

Industry in the north grew at 25 percent per annum in the 10 years following the Korean War and at 14 percent from 1965 to 1978. US officials were greatly concerned about south Korea’s economy, which lagged far behind, raising doubts about the merits of Washington’s right-wing, pro-capitalist, neo-colonial project in Korea. By 1980, the north Korean capital, Pyongyang, was one of the best run, most efficient cities in Asia. Seoul, on the other hand, was a vast warren “of sweatshops to make Dante or Engels faint,” complete with a teeming population of homeless.

Eager to present the south’s economic system as superior to the north’s, Washington allowed the ROK to pursue a vigorous program of industrial planning behind a wall of tariffs and subsidies, while, at the same time, offering south Korean industry access to the world market. To help matters along, huge dollops of aid were poured into the country. Japan delivered $800 million in grants and loans as compensation for 35 years of colonial domination, at a time south Korea’s exports were only $200 million. And in return for dispatching 50,000 soldiers to fight on the US-side in Vietnam, Washington handed over $1 billion in mercenary payments from 1965 to 1970, equal to eight percent of the south’s GDP. South Korean engineering firms were given contracts with the US military, and Vietnam soaked up almost all of the south’s steel exports (produced by an integrated steel mill built with the $800 million aid injection from Japan.)
https://gowans.wordpress.com/2007/03/03/understanding-north-korea/
 

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Chris, I am not sure whether you are just trolling or not. The paragraph you quoted, much biased as it is, tells us everything we need to know. There are two Koreas, one people, where one is a global economic powerhouse and the other is basically a neofascist hereditary monarchy with starved enslaved subjects. It is not even a communist country anymore, it is an abomination. We can talk about the USA whatever we want but it is enough just to look and compare the 'occupied South' and 'free, independent North'.

btw, no one is particularly in love with Americans there, no one in the region, including South Korea and Japan. No real sympathy and loyalty there. But they should absolutely love the US when they see North Korea.
 

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Chris, I am not sure whether you are just trolling or not. The paragraph you quoted, much biased as it is, tells us everything we need to know. There are two Koreas, one people, where one is a global economic powerhouse and the other is basically a neofascist hereditary monarchy with starved enslaved subjects. It is not even a communist country anymore, it is an abomination. We can talk about the USA whatever we want but it is enough just to look and compare the 'occupied South' and 'free, independent North'.

btw, no one is particularly in love with Americans there, no one in the region, including South Korea and Japan. No real sympathy and loyalty there. But they should absolutely love the US when they see North Korea.
You missed the point. It explains why the South is an economic powerhouse, their economy was artificially upgraded with aid and profited from imperialist warfare because the US didn't want the DPRK to outshine them. How is this a success of the system? If I give a broke man €100, does that provide evidence for that man's success? South Korea's success is built upon that which every successful capitalist country is built upon: theft, slavery, war and genocide. Initially the DPRK was a lot more successful, while being a lot more self-sufficient.
 

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You missed the point. It explains why the South is an economic powerhouse, their economy was artificially upgraded with aid and profited from imperialist warfare because the US didn't want the DPRK to outshine them. How is this a success of the system? If I give a broke man €100, does that provide evidence for that man's success? South Korea's success is built upon that which every successful capitalist country is built upon: theft, slavery, war and genocide. Initially the DPRK was a lot more successful, while being a lot more self-sufficient.
So why didn't China and USSR upgrade the economy of the North and compete? If you give a man a hundred and he turns it into a million like S. Korea did, that is the evidence of success. As for the self-sufficiency of N.Korea in these 60+ years, no comment.

There is a solution only in theory, it would mean collapse of North K. dictatorship, which won't happen until China stops propping it up, demilitarization of the entire peninsula, it would mean the US guys getting back home, which is also unlikely, unification into one Korea under international monitoring, be it UN or something else at least for a decade.
 

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So why didn't China and USSR upgrade the economy of the North and compete? If you give a man a hundred and he turns it into a million like S. Korea did, that is the evidence of success. As for the self-sufficiency of N.Korea in these 60+ years, no comment.
No, that would imply everyone has the same chance to succeed, while it almost always depends on the wealth you are born into or in the South's case given. Think of Trump's ''small million dollar loan'' from his dad. It's the ultimate capitalist lie: everyone can become a millionaire! Yes, in theory, in reality the odds for a millionaire's son and a Namibian farmer are a bit different. Without tons of aid the South would be off worse than the DPRK. The growth countries like the Soviet Union and China have undergone under Communism has never been matched by capitalism.

The entire outlook of the DPRK's Juche philosophy is self-reliance, if they had accepted aid from the Soviets and China they would have collapsed together with them. And Communists aren't imperialists to begin with, which is why the Soviets withdrew from the DPRK as per the agreement with the US, while the US broke that same agreement and is still occupying the South. It's why the DPRK has supplied Africa with genuine aid, while the West only exploits them.
There is a solution only in theory, it would mean collapse of North K. dictatorship, which won't happen until China stops propping it up, demilitarization of the entire peninsula, it would mean the US guys getting back home, which is also unlikely, unification into one Korea under international monitoring, be it UN or something else at least for a decade.
Might happen after this: https://medium.com/insurge-intelligence/pentagon-study-declares-american-empire-is-collapsing-746754cdaebf

And every socialist country is a dictatorship according to the West, that's how their propaganda works. Their notions of ''freedom'' and ''human rights'' are entirely different from those of the people they exploit. Gaddafi was a ''brutal dictator'' as well, while in reality he built a socialist success story and was so loved by the people he could drive the streets in an open car during an air raid because he had nothing to fear.

The "human rights" advertised by the imperialists are privileges of the rich, privileges to do anything on the strength of money. The imperialists do not recognize the right of unemployed people to work, or the right of orphans or people without support to eat and survive, for instance, as human rights. As they do not grant working people elementary rights to existence and as they pursue anti-popular policies and policies of racial and national discrimination and colonialism, the imperialists have no right to speak about human rights. The imperialists are the most heinous enemy of human rights.

- Kim Jong-il
 

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Private capital tends to become concentrated in few hands, partly because of competition among the capitalists, and partly because technological development and the increasing division of labor encourage the formation of larger units of production at the expense of smaller ones. The result of these developments is an oligarchy of private capital the enormous power of which cannot be effectively checked even by a democratically organized political society. This is true since the members of legislative bodies are selected by political parties, largely financed or otherwise influenced by private capitalists who, for all practical purposes, separate the electorate from the legislature. The consequence is that the representatives of the people do not in fact sufficiently protect the interests of the underprivileged sections of the population. Moreover, under existing conditions, private capitalists inevitably control, directly or indirectly, the main sources of information (press, radio, education). It is thus extremely difficult, and indeed in most cases quite impossible, for the individual citizen to come to objective conclusions and to make intelligent use of his political rights.

The situation prevailing in an economy based on the private ownership of capital is thus characterized by two main principles: first, means of production (capital) are privately owned and the owners dispose of them as they see fit; second, the labor contract is free. Of course, there is no such thing as a pure capitalist society in this sense. In particular, it should be noted that the workers, through long and bitter political struggles, have succeeded in securing a somewhat improved form of the “free labor contract” for certain categories of workers. But taken as a whole, the present day economy does not differ much from “pure” capitalism.

Production is carried on for profit, not for use. There is no provision that all those able and willing to work will always be in a position to find employment; an “army of unemployed” almost always exists. The worker is constantly in fear of losing his job. Since unemployed and poorly paid workers do not provide a profitable market, the production of consumers’ goods is restricted, and great hardship is the consequence. Technological progress frequently results in more unemployment rather than in an easing of the burden of work for all. The profit motive, in conjunction with competition among capitalists, is responsible for an instability in the accumulation and utilization of capital which leads to increasingly severe depressions. Unlimited competition leads to a huge waste of labor, and to that crippling of the social consciousness of individuals which I mentioned before.

This crippling of individuals I consider the worst evil of capitalism. Our whole educational system suffers from this evil. An exaggerated competitive attitude is inculcated into the student, who is trained to worship acquisitive success as a preparation for his future career.

I am convinced there is only one way to eliminate these grave evils, namely through the establishment of a socialist economy, accompanied by an educational system which would be oriented toward social goals. In such an economy, the means of production are owned by society itself and are utilized in a planned fashion. A planned economy, which adjusts production to the needs of the community, would distribute the work to be done among all those able to work and would guarantee a livelihood to every man, woman, and child. The education of the individual, in addition to promoting his own innate abilities, would attempt to develop in him a sense of responsibility for his fellow men in place of the glorification of power and success in our present society.
Albert Einstein - Why Socialism?

https://monthlyreview.org/2009/05/01/why-socialism/
 

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The North's growth was slowed down in the sixties when they sided with China in the Sino-Soviet split and the Soviets cut off aid, but the South only caught up economically in the mid-eighties. Especially impressive given that the North was almost entirely flattened by the most brutal bombing campaign in history during the Korean War and had to literally be rebuilt from the ground up. The DPRK was better off because the Communist block gave them trading partners, when that disappeared the economic sanctions from the West started hitting them massively, resulting in the infamous famine in the mid-nineties. Of course the West looked in delight at the sight of starving Koreans and didn't offer aid, hoping the regime would fall. No such luck as the country was built upon self-reliance rather than connecting itself to the fate of a bigger Communist power.
Sorry CK, but that's a load of crock and you probably know it. :lol: Unlike you, ssin (probably) and I have actually lived under the economic sanctions, in a country that also lost numerous trading partners and moreover had to face real threats and bombs and not empty ones like DPRK, and still there were no mass-famine like in DPRK.
The West of course provided the aid after DPRK officially asked for it, and "self-reliance" is nothing but empty bs if large number of your entire population is starving to death. Furthermore, here is how your alleged "free healthcare" actually looks like:

North Korea hunger: Two in five undernourished, says UN - BBC News

In a new report, it said most North Koreans also lacked access to basic healthcare or sanitation.

Diarrhoea and pneumonia are the two main causes of death for children under five, the report said.
"Furthermore, 10.5 million people, or 41% of the total population, are undernourished."
Booming economy my ass.

I'm sure many of their elderly would love to
You are sure as in you've talked with them or as in "in the fantasy world they would sure loved to"? :) Because I've met quite a few of them and they would think I'm either insane or pulling their leg. :)
 

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The DPRK does not face "empty" threats. This country was bombed to shit by American, British and Japanese imperialists in the 1950s — it is amazing that the DPRK managed to survive that onslaught. Their resilience is truly admirable. They know more than most how menacing liberal-bourgeois fuckers are. I'm very, very pleased that they have nuclear weapons and that they continue to developed refined weapons to defend themselves from predatory international capital.
 

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The DPRK does not face "empty" threats. This country was bombed to shit by American, British and Japanese imperialists in the 1950s — it is amazing that the DPRK managed to survive that onslaught. Their resilience is truly admirable. They know more than most how menacing liberal-bourgeois fuckers are. I'm very, very pleased that they have nuclear weapons and that they continue to developed refined weapons to defend themselves from predatory international capital.
I wonder how pleased you (and CK and others) would be if you could taste a little of their daily life. :) Easy to send them thumbs up while living in some of the most liberal and developed countries in the world.
 

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Them empty threats. I guess most recently Iraq, Libya, Syria and Yemen were also facing empty threats. Thanks for denying the struggle of 25 million people. And economical warfare is real, see Venezuela at the moment.
The West of course provided the aid after DPRK officially asked for it,
You literally made this up. The DPRK has no problem asking for aid, they asked for $30 million at the beginning of this year after a flood (obviously after getting hit with new sanctions at the end of 2016 that cost them $800 million). I would advise you to read some books on neocolonialism to see how the West uses ''aid'' to plunder the Third World. Take ten things for every single thing you give.
and "self-reliance" is nothing but empty bs if large number of your entire population is starving to death.
Self-reliance doesn't mean being cut off from all trade partners, which is what the imperialists have tried to establish through economical warfare.
Furthermore, here is how your alleged "free healthcare" actually looks like:

North Korea hunger: Two in five undernourished, says UN - BBC News

Booming economy my ass.
It's not even remotely controversial to claim their economy has been continuously growing over the past twenty years, you can even find this on Wikipedia. Have you actually read the report? It actually shows growth, despite being wildly inconclusive due to lack of data, what you are doing is the same as pointing your finger at an African country and laughing because they are poor. Ever wondered why the media spends so much attention on the DPRK, while dozens of other countries living under capitalism are just as poor or poorer and are ignored?
You are sure as in you've talked with them or as in "in the fantasy world they would sure loved to"? :) Because I've met quite a few of them and they would think I'm either insane or pulling their leg. :)
I somehow suspect they weren't part of the half living in poverty.
 

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I wonder how pleased you (and CK and others) would be if you could taste a little of their daily life. :) Easy to send them thumbs up while living in some of the most liberal and developed countries in the world.
If we would follow the line of our ''liberal and developed countries'', we wouldn't give a fuck about the Third World. So it's funny when people who couldn't care less about the Third World try to shame those who do. The world upside down.
 

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If we would follow the line of our ''liberal and developed countries'', we wouldn't give a fuck about the Third World. So it's funny when people who couldn't care less about the Third World try to shame those who do. The world upside down.
But you don't give a fuck. :shrug:

Them empty threats. I guess most recently Iraq, Libya, Syria and Yemen were also facing empty threats. Thanks for denying the struggle of 25 million people.
DPRK is not a Middle Eastern country, that should be obvious to pretty much anyone. The people struggle because their leaders choose them to do so, if there were ever a living example of 1984 it's right there.

It actually shows growth, despite being wildly inconclusive due to lack of data, what you are doing is the same as pointing your finger at an African country and laughing because they are poor. Ever wondered why the media spends so much attention on the DPRK, while dozens of other countries living under capitalism are just as poor or poorer and are ignored?
I certainly didn't tell them to pick up Juche, they could've been another Japan or Taiwan instead of black hole of Asia. Of course by that I don't mean the usual people, but the corrupted leaders who never lacked anything in their life are getting along just fine I imagine. The dear leader didn't have a problem sending his son to a imperialist school in the west, did he?

Media barely spends any attention on DPRK, they are almost never a major news expect when they launch something (and that's probably why they keep doing it, they love attention), otherwise they would be as much news as Moldavia or the present day Kosovo.
 

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But you don't give a fuck. :shrug:
Capitalist ideology, you have been groomed from birth not to care and to think ''there is nothing I can do about it'' to such an extent that you can't even comprehend the notion of other people genuinely caring. That is how the exploiters remain in power. In the near future there will be two billion people who live in urban slums in abject poverty, Communism is the only ideology that offers these people a way out and seeks to liberate them.

North Korea tourism: US to ban Americans from visiting - BBC News

In the meantime the brutal despotic US dictatorship has stripped its citizens from their freedom of movement :(
 

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Czech Trump won the election in a landslide

Czech election: Billionaire Babis wins by large margin - BBC News

The far right party also did surprisingly well. The leader of the party has Japanese origin.You can't make this stuff up.

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-czech-election-farright/far-right-scores-surprise-success-in-czech-election-idUSKBN1CQ0T3

The establishment parties basically went down the toilet.

It is time for the world to meet again the wonderful life of Mitteleuropa, the historical hotbed of a specific form of 'petty bourgeoisie' fascism. :rolleyes:

 

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The petro-yuan bombshell | The Vineyard of the Saker

The new 55-page “America First” National Security Strategy (NSS), drafted over the course of 2017, defines Russia and China as “revisionist” powers, “rivals”, and for all practical purposes strategic competitors of the United States.

The NSS stops short of defining Russia and China as enemies, allowing for an “attempt to build a great partnership with those and other countries”. Still, Beijing qualified it as “reckless” and “irrational.” The Kremlin noted its “imperialist character” and “disregard for a multipolar world”. Iran, predictably, is described by the NSS as “the world’s most significant state sponsor of terrorism.”

Russia, China and Iran happen to be the three key movers and shakers in the ongoing geopolitical and geoeconomic process of Eurasia integration.

The NSS can certainly be regarded as a response to what happened at the BRICS summit in Xiamen last September. Then, Russian President Vladimir Putin insisted on “the BRIC countries’ concerns over the unfairness of the global financial and economic architecture which does not give due regard to the growing weight of the emerging economies”, and stressed the need to “overcome the excessive domination of a limited number of reserve currencies”.

That was a clear reference to the US dollar, which accounts for nearly two thirds of total reserve currency around the world and remains the benchmark determining the price of energy and strategic raw materials.

And that brings us to the unnamed secret at the heart of the NSS; the Russia-China “threat” to the US dollar.

The CIPS/SWIFT face-off

The website of the China Foreign Exchange Trade System (CFETS) recently announced the establishment of a yuan-ruble payment system, hinting that similar systems regarding other currencies participating in the New Silk Roads, a.k.a. Belt and Road Initiative (BRI) will also be in place in the near future.

Crucially, this is not about reducing currency risk; after all Russia and China have increasingly traded bilaterally in their own currencies since the 2014 US-imposed sanctions on Russia. This is about the implementation of a huge, new alternative reserve currency zone, bypassing the US dollar.

The decision follows the establishment by Beijing, in October 2015, of the China International Payments System (CIPS). CIPS has a cooperation agreement with the private, Belgium-based SWIFT international bank clearing system, through which virtually every global transaction must transit.

What matters in this case is that Beijing – as well as Moscow – clearly read the writing on the wall when, in 2012, Washington applied pressure on SWIFT; blocked international clearing for every Iranian bank; and froze $100 billion in Iranian assets overseas as well as Tehran’s potential to export oil. In the event Washington might decide to slap sanctions on China, bank clearing though CIPS works as a de facto sanctions-evading mechanism.

Last March, Russia’s central bank opened its first office in Beijing. Moscow is launching its first $1 billion yuan-denominated government bond sale. Moscow has made it very clear it is committed to a long term strategy to stop using the US dollar as their primary currency in global trade, moving alongside Beijing towards what could be dubbed a post-Bretton Woods exchange system.

Gold is essential in this strategy. Russia, China, India, Brazil & South Africa are all either large producers or consumers of gold – or both. Following what has been extensively discussed in their summits since the early 2010s, the BRICS are bound to focus on trading physical gold.

Markets such as COMEX actually trade derivatives on gold, and are backed by an insignificant amount of physical gold. Major BRICS gold producers – especially the Russia-China partnership – plan to be able to exercise extra influence in setting up global gold prices.

The ultimate politically charged dossier

Intractable questions referring to the US dollar as top reserve currency have been discussed at the highest levels of JP Morgan for at least five years now. There cannot be a more politically charged dossier. The NSS duly sidestepped it.

The current state of play is still all about the petrodollar system; since last year what used to be a key, “secret” informal deal between the US and the House of Saud is firmly in the public domain.

Even warriors in the Hindu Kush may now be aware of how oil and virtually all commodities must be traded in US dollars, and how these petrodollars are recycled into US Treasuries. Through this mechanism Washington has accumulated an astonishing $20 trillion in debt – and counting.

Vast populations all across MENA (Middle East-Northern Africa) also learned what happened when Iraq’s Saddam Hussein decided to sell oil in euros, or when Muammar Gaddafi planned to issue a pan-African gold dinar.

But now it’s China who’s entering the fray, following on plans set up way back in 2012. And the name of the game is oil-futures trading priced in yuan, with the yuan fully convertible into gold on the Shanghai and Hong Kong foreign exchange markets.

The Shanghai Futures Exchange and its subsidiary, the Shanghai International Energy Exchange (INE) have already run four production environment tests for crude oil futures. Operations were supposed to start at the end of 2017; but even if they start sometime in early 2018 the fundamentals are clear; this triple win (oil/yuan/gold) completely bypasses the US dollar. The era of the petro-yuan is at hand.

Of course there are questions on how Beijing will technically manage to set up a rival mark to Brent and WTI, or whether China’s capital controls will influence it. Beijing has been quite discreet on the triple win; the petro-yuan was not even mentioned in National Development and Reform Commission documents following the 19th CCP Congress last October.

What’s certain is that the BRICS supported the petro-yuan move at their summit in Xiamen, as diplomats confirmed to Asia Times. Venezuela is also on board. It’s crucial to remember that Russia is number two and Venezuela is number seven among the world’s Top Ten oil producers. Considering the pull of China’s economy, they may soon be joined by other producers.

Yao Wei, chief China economist at Societe Generale in Paris, goes straight to the point, remarking how “this contract has the potential to greatly help China’s push for yuan internationalization.”

The hidden riches of “belt” and “road”

An extensive report by DBS in Singapore hits most of the right notes linking the internationalization of the yuan with the expansion of BRI.

In 2018, six major BRI projects will be on overdrive; the Jakarta-Bandung high-speed railway, the China-Laos railway, the Addis Ababa-Djibouti railway, the Hungary-Serbia railway, the Melaka Gateway project in Malaysia, and the upgrading of Gwadar port in Pakistan.

HSBC estimates that BRI as a whole will generate no less than an additional, game-changing $2.5 trillion worth of new trade a year.

It’s important to keep in mind that the “belt” in BRI should be seen as a series of corridors connecting Eastern China with oil/gas rich regions in Central Asia and the Middle East, while the “roads” soon to be plied by high-speed rail traverse regions filled with – what else – un-mined gold.

A key determinant of the future of the petro-yuan is what the House of Saud will do about it. Should Crown Prince – and inevitable future king – MBS opt to follow Russia’s lead, to dub it as a paradigm shift would be the understatement of the century.

Yuan-denominated gold contracts will be traded not only in Shanghai and Hong Kong but also in Dubai. Saudi Arabia is also considering to issue so-called Panda bonds, after the Emirate of Sharjah is set to take the lead in the Middle East for Chinese interbank bonds.

Of course the prelude to D-Day will be when the House of Saud officially announces it accepts yuan for at least part of its exports to China. A follower of the Austrian school of economics correctly asserts that for oil-producing nations, higher oil price in US dollars is not as important as market share; “They are increasingly able to choose in which currencies they want to trade.”

What’s clear is that the House of Saud simply cannot alienate China as one of its top customers; it’s Beijing who will dictate future terms. That may include extra pressure for Chinese participation in Aramco’s IPO. In parallel, Washington would see Riyadh embracing the petro-yuan as the ultimate red line.


An independent European report points to what may be the Chinese trump card; “an authorization to issue treasury bills in yuan by Saudi Arabia”; the creation of a Saudi investment fund; and the acquisition of a 5% share of Aramco.

Nations under US sanctions such as Russia, Iran and Venezuela will be among the first to embrace the petro-yuan. Smaller producers such as Angola and Nigeria are already selling oil/gas to China in yuan.

And if you don’t export oil but is part of BRI, such as Pakistan, the least you can do is replace the US dollar in bilateral trade, as Interior Minister Ahsan Iqbal is currently evaluating.

A key feature of the geoconomic heart of the world moving from the West to Asia is that by the start of the next decade the petro-yuan and trade bypassing the US dollar will be certified facts on the ground across Eurasia.

The NSS for its part promises to preserve “peace through strength”. As Washington currently deploys no less than 291,000 troops in 183 countries and has sent Special Ops to no less than 149 nations in 2017 alone, it’s hard to argue the US is at “peace” – especially when the NSS seeks to channel even more resources to the industrial-military complex.

“Revisionist” Russia-China have committed an unpardonable sin; they have concluded that pumping the US military budget by buying US bonds that allow the US Treasury to finance a multi-trillion dollar deficit without raising interest rates is an unsustainable proposition for the Global South. Their “threat” – under the framework of the BRICS as well as the SCO, which includes prospective members Iran and Turkey – is to increasingly settle bilateral and multilateral trade bypassing the US dollar.


It ain’t over till the fat (golden) lady sings. When the beginning of the end of the petrodollar system – established by Kissinger in tandem with the House of Saud way back in 1974 – becomes a fact on the ground, all eyes will be focused on the NSS counterpunch.

 
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