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Discussion Starter #1
That Tipsarevic NEVER takes his forehand down the line? Whenever he runs around his BH, he always hits his inside-out FH to the opponents' BH. His patterns of play are so basic, it's basically a re-run of the same thing over and over.

Anyone notice this? And do you notice similar patterns with other players..........do you notice players who have specific patterns of play that rarely if ever change regardless of opponent?
 

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I haven't noticed Tipsarevic's pattern, but I noticed that Davydenko "always" plays cross-court backhand volley. Monfils never hits the ball responding on opponent's dropshot, he always pushes the ball, it's ridiculous that most of players do it (what they do on practice session to avoid this amateurish behaviour?), but Monfils is more pushing in this specific situation than anyone else.
 

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There are lots of patterns. Murray kept doing the slice down the line and the crosscourt backhand, but Tipsy was never ready for it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Monfils never hits the ball responding on opponent's dropshot, he always pushes the ball, it's ridiculous that most of players do it (what they do on practice session to avoid this amateurish behaviour?), but Monfils is more pushing in this specific situation than anyone else.
Totally noticed this myself, I think players don't feel comfortable hitting the ball aggressively from that position; the ball is too low for them to feel comfortable with. So they take the safe move.

Nadal ALWAYS takes his BH chip DTL when he is forced into the net, for example. Most players simply aren't comfortable at the net really.

His FH isn't exactly his strength anyway, had loads of forehand errors.
True, it isn't his strength, but he'd be a lot better offensive player if he'd have the ability to direct forehands DTL. Murray knew Janko's FH was going to his BH and Andy was really taking advantage of that in the final two sets, and Janko did zero to change the pattern.

He also seriously has problems creating pace with the FH consistently, but that's a different conversation.
 

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True, it isn't his strength, but he'd be a lot better offensive player if he'd have the ability to direct forehands DTL. Murray knew Janko's FH was going to his BH and Andy was really taking advantage of that in the final two sets, and Janko did zero to change the pattern.

He also seriously has problems creating pace with the FH consistently, but that's a different conversation.
In today's match for example, he was already taking plenty of risks, not sure it would've been much better if he went for FH DTL. Maybe yes, maybe no, but I don't think it would've been a game-changer for him.
 

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Totally noticed this myself, I think players don't feel comfortable hitting the ball aggressively from that position; the ball is too low for them to feel comfortable with. So they take the safe move.
Obviously it's tough for amateurs thus I'm surprised professionals do the same conservative shit. They should practice this situation a lot because during a match it happens more often that a player is invited to the net by a dropshot than lobbed, so first they should intensely practice this situation which requires harder bending knees and bigger flick of the wrist (so nothing special), then joking around with hot-dogs/twenners. Logically this trick shot might be less using if players deal better responding on drop-shots. They should watch Agassi's matches, it was his trademark shot - finishing opponents after their dropshots, merciless just like in executing overheads from the back of the court. Nuances make a difference, it's not only a matter of playing good serves and solid shots from both wings, Agassi could always efficiently spoil opponent's wise strategy of mixing up the pace (dropshots and moon-lobs) :eek:
 

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Discussion Starter #8
It would have made Andy think about doing something different, and that alone would have helped Janko. I don't think it would be a game-changer but when you were in the position Tipsarevic was in where he was more or less dominated from the middle of the second set on, you gotta do something different. He took BH's earlier and started going DTL with the BH, he started coming to the net more. If only he did more with his forehand, at least he would have another weapon to potential trouble Andy with.
 

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Yup, sounds good, but the question remains how well he would be able to execute it. Maybe he throws it in the mix next time... at least he finally seems serious about his game and staying in top 10.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Obviously it's tough for amateurs thus I'm surprised professionals do the same conservative shit. They should practice this situation a lot because during a match it happens more often that a player is invited to the net by a dropshot than lobbed, so first they should intensely practice this situation which requires harder bending knees and bigger flick of the wrist (so nothing special), then joking around with hot-dogs/twenners. Logically this trick shot might be less using if players deal better responding on drop-shots. They should watch Agassi's matches, it was his trademark shot - finishing opponents after their dropshots, merciless just like in executing overheads from the back of the court. Nuances make a difference, it's not only a matter of playing good serves and solid shots from both wings, Agassi could always efficiently spoil opponent's wise strategy of mixing up the pace (dropshots and moon-lobs) :eek:
Players can't deal with dropshot that well because players actually don't practice much outside of the standard shots these days. Players don't train much at the net, and it reflects in their lack of comfort at the net. Players don't practice handling different variety of shots. I agree about Agassi in that he didn't get fooled or thrown off rhythm when his opponent would try to hit a dropshot, slice, or mix up spins with the ball. He would continue being aggressive, in particular with his footwork. It's the footwork that players these days fail. Players lack the aggressive, forward movement with their footwork these days; they're not willing to move forward unless forced. A lot of that can be blamed on the slower, higher bouncing courts of today.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Whenever an opponent hits a topspin BH that kicks up high to Nadal's BH, Nadal will ALWAYS hit the BH to the opponents BH side, almost always moonballed.
 
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