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I'm admittedly late to the party on this, but his whole shtick with ripping at his clothes, changing his shorts, changing his wristbands, and whacking his shoes is pretty odd.

The constant self berating is pretty strange as well, but at least that I can understand. The other stuff baffles me.
 

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Looks like everyone on MTF is immune to weirdness due to overexposure.
 
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Mugray always behaves like a classless brat.
 

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The only 'normal' player is Monfils.
His constant talking to himself in that match against Djokovic was borderline creepy :unsure: Though being weird is probably quite common in sports. Many football players are superstitious like hell and other sports too very likely have their examples. I think it was David Coulthard who used to wear the same underwear at every race :silly:
 

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Well he did have a hard childhood, what with the Dunblane tragedy and all... group that with the amount of talent he possesses and your never gonna get a perfect prototype are you..?
 

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Yeah, the British press are picking up on it a little more, and I agree with them. He needs to stop doing it. Not only does he waste energy doing all that, but it sends the wrong message to his opponent. He might as well be wearing a neon sign on his forehead that says: "I'm not happy with the level of my game" or "what you're doing is really bothering me at the moment."

He is a perfectionist, but he needs to get over that attitude a little. It is good that he cares, but striving for perfection can actually be very counter-productive. Anyone in a pressured office job wouldn't be able to function like that.

Clearly not a winning mentality.
 

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Leng jai is spot-on.

Anyway, I think the thing where he bangs the racquet against his ankles is him being frustrated and needing to hit something, but not wanting to bang the racquet on the ground because that's racquet abuse, and so he hits a softer target and gets his frustration out in a legal, less obtrusive way.

Have no freaking idea what the wristband thing is about.
 

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The problem with Murray's antics is that he never channels them into positive energy...just players shitter until it snowballs in a loss.
 

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Never understood what's the deal with shirt pulling and constant "I am injured" kinda behavior.
 

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weird yes, but understandable. pressure on him to deliver is immense, its huge. that plus his 'ordinary' character. I always said andy is 'too normal' for this thing, where you have to be incredible resilient, and ordinary people arent as such. so, perhaps, all those factors contribute to him inventing all sort of... ahem... behavioral patterns - to battle those extraordinary circumstances.

some bs like that.
 

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He is a loser. He won't win a slam. How many time is he tanking big matches? This last one was not even close on his favorite surface.
 

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Murray is an odd duck but I have to admit that I'm greatly entertained by his cursing in slo-mo courtesy of the AO camera team. :D



http://www.guardian.co.uk/sport/blog/2011/jan/31/andy-murray-australian-open-final
Andy Murray swears by bad body language in Australian Open defeat
The Australian Open provided balletic super slo-mo which revealed a player's every grimace, expression and expletive

by Martin Kelner, The Guardian, 31 January 2011

So, the estate of Fred Perry can breathe easily, as the monkey on the back of British tennis shows no immediate signs of dismounting. Novak Djokovic's not entirely unexpected victory in yesterday's Australian Open final – at least, not to those of us who have been following the tournament on Eurosport – means British sports fans can continue to debate the two great questions in tennis: What does Andy Murray have to do to win a grand slam event and Who exactly is the British No2?

In fairness to the BBC, those of us rising early to listen to Radio Five Live before the match had our expectations suitably lowered when Pat Cash said he could find no one out there who believed Murray could win.

Fortunately for the bookmakers, they found plenty back here. Five Live interviewed some in a pub in Murray's hometown, Dunblane, one of whom said he felt much better than he did last year, awaiting the match with a pint in his hand (this was shortly after 8.05 in the morning).

If you are reading this in your paper this morning, sir, I am afraid I have to tell you that Murray lost. Actually, even half-cut it would not have been difficult to see which way the match was going. I refer, of course, to Murray's famous body language, which has made Desmond Morrises of us all.

My team of analysts have calculated that we get roughly 27 minutes into a Murray match before the question of body language is raised. I knew the Scot was in with a good chance against David Ferrer in the semi-final because we were nearly three-quarters of an hour in before the BBC commentator Andrew Cotter mentioned the BL issue. "Sometimes he has the body language of a man who's two sets down and two breaks down," said Cotter, when Murray indulged in some characteristic self-excoriation when one of his shots caught the top of the net in the first set.

"He's never been the most perky figure on court," agreed the analyst John Lloyd, which as an understatement ranks alongside "I don't see Andy Gray as a leading contender for the Orange Prize for Fiction this year".

We have been able to study Andy's BL even more closely than usual in Melbourne because of the Australian television director's addiction to super slo-mo. After almost every point we have had balletic slow motion sequences, focusing sometimes on the players' feet, but more often on their expressions.

It looks very lovely, but with full-face close-ups it has made Cotter feel he has to apologise for any expletives that might have been caught in glorious slo-mo. "Apologies for some of the earthy language," said Cotter during the semi-final on Friday morning, and then a few minutes later: "Again apologies for the language if you are having your mid‑morning break."

The apologies came a little less frequently during the final yesterday, but really they need not have bothered at all. I am something of a connoisseur of swearing, having hosted a discussion on the subject at the British Library recently, and even I could not make out exactly what words the players were using.

The slo-mo is so slow you would need to be not only an expert lip-reader, but to speed up the footage slightly to make out exactly what deprecations were being issued. In those circumstances, I should be inclined to advise anyone liable to be offended to fuck right off – which may be why I have not been chosen to commentate on the tennis.

Which, incidentally, is a job I feel I could do. It must be the easiest job in television. You watch them play the point, and then say "Oh, that really is a magnificent shot" or something similar, then you comment on Andy Murray's body language and, job done, you can go back to the crossword.

The punditry is trickier, what with tennis being a sport that almost defies analysis. What is going on between the ears is at least as important as what is happening on court, and here Eurosport has been more forthright than the BBC, not feeling so obliged to act merely as a cheerleader for Murray.

The excellent Mats Wilander – who may only have been chosen so Eurosport could call its tennis show Game, Set and Mats – suggested that Murray not only needs to tweak his game a little to win a slam event, throwing off his reluctance to chance a risky passing shot, but also needs "a tweak as a person", not in his mostly impeccable behaviour off the court, but in his demeanour on it.

All that negative body language – and the other language – is not helpful, says Mats.

Still no word, though, on the hunt for the British No2. I shall keep you posted.
 

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He is a loser. He won't win a slam. How many time is he tanking big matches? This last one was not even close on his favorite surface.
Blue clay is Murray's best surface? First I've heard of it. I was always of the opinion that Andrew's favourite surfaces were fast hardcourts. Then again he has frequently said that he enjoys playing on clay so who am I to say otherwise.
 

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weird yes, but understandable. pressure on him to deliver is immense, its huge. that plus his 'ordinary' character. I always said andy is 'too normal' for this thing, where you have to be incredible resilient, and ordinary people arent as such. so, perhaps, all those factors contribute to him inventing all sort of... ahem... behavioral patterns - to battle those extraordinary circumstances.

some bs like that.
I'll fill in the ahem with nutjob.
 

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Not weird at all but when he gets out of control he gets worked up over silly things.
 

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At the Australian Open Murray answered with...

Q. You were talking to yourself a lot out there today and gesturing. What were your thoughts? What were you saying?

ANDY MURRAY: I was trying to get myself pumped up. It was very slow, cool conditions out on the court. You need to make sure you're moving your feet a lot when you're out there. And, yeah, because he's a very unpredictable player, you can't switch off. He goes through periods in matches where he plays great tennis, and you have to sort of hang on a little bit. Then he can go through periods where he makes some mistakes.

You need to sort of urge yourself to play a solid, sort of stable match, not make too many mistakes, and in the end hope that, you know, he'll make a few more mistakes than you.

To me that implies he doesn't believe in himself and he's game.
You can't just HOPE in tennis.
 
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he doesnt believe in hmself in slams

he cant handle british pressure

he mentally breaks down way too easily

every slam that goes by is making it worse

he has started to wonder if he will ever win a slam

self destructive personality- self loathing- mixed with hatred for the media expecting hso much from him- classic borg like behaviour (borg hid it much better)

too much respect for rafa and nole- to beat someone you need to hate them- make no mistake about rafa's "humble" attitude- when he is on court, he wants to destroy the other guy- only way to win
 

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Yeah, the British press are picking up on it a little more, and I agree with them. He needs to stop doing it. Not only does he waste energy doing all that, but it sends the wrong message to his opponent. He might as well be wearing a neon sign on his forehead that says: "I'm not happy with the level of my game" or "what you're doing is really bothering me at the moment."

He is a perfectionist, but he needs to get over that attitude a little. It is good that he cares, but striving for perfection can actually be very counter-productive. Anyone in a pressured office job wouldn't be able to function like that.

Clearly not a winning mentality.
My thoughts exactly, couldn´t have said it better. There is no better boost for his opponents´confidence than his own outbursts and screaming. You don´t see any other top ten player doing anything like that, they´re all focused, sharp, and mentally stable.
 

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He knows he can't beat Nadal and it is making him mad. Needs to let it go because he will hurt himself soon because he is not beating Nadal again
 
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