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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
(As we know, cortisol in the human body is a bad thing for athletes, because in order to produce our best it is important that our testosterone level is high and our cortisol level is low. Testosterone generates aggressive focus. Cortisol generates emotion and subsequent nervousness [generated by a focus on reward].

When I hear so many athletes focusing on winning titles or increasing their ranking, I sense that they have been encouraged to focus on the 'reward' which generates a high cortisol level [high emotionality]. So my question is, are ATP level coaches encouraging their players to have specific career goals [high ranking or number of titles]? If so, then I can see why so many players suffer from nerves in tight matches. Their cortisol level is too high)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Ask Nadal. I'm sure he'll tell you everything you need to know about all sorts of hormones and then some.
(Exactly, when it comes to delivering on big points, Rafa is numero uno. He handles pressure than anyone else because he doesn't focus on the 'reward', he focuses on 'the next point'. His testosterone level is therefore likely higher than his cortisol level)
 

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(Exactly, when it comes to delivering on big points, Rafa is numero uno. He handles pressure than anyone else because he doesn't focus on the 'reward', he focuses on 'the next point'. His testosterone level is therefore likely higher than his cortisol level)
Still 4 finals lost to Nole this year, I hate to remind you all. ;) :shrug:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Still 4 finals lost to Nole this year, I hate to remind you all. ;) :shrug:
(Don't forget Rafa beat Djokovic in the 2008 Olympics. Then Djokovic beat Rafa 3 straight times in 2009. But Rafa beat Djokovic in the 2010 US Open. We all know who shows up to THE BIG DANCE, and who suffers from nerves....

Djokovic is the tennis equivalent of LeBron James. We just saw them win everything but THE BIG DANCE)
 

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We'll see we'll see, Nole may have overcome his nerves (and other issues) by now. ;)

Gluten-free diet works miracles btw. ;) Not sure it helps to reduce the cortisol level though. ;)
 

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No, tennis coaches encourage the usage of EPO and steroids.
 

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You are sort of overanalysing the situation my friend. And the most major flaw is that what you are talking about it like one would reduce the other and vice versa. It isn't like wohooo my testosterone level rises then my cortisol decreases.

Furthermore such things aren't exactly controlled in any large degree by your mind but from the more primitive part of the brain. Otherwise you could increase your testosterone to illegal levels just thinking about it! doesn't work that way. In fact you should probably remove that whole testosterone thing from your argument. It flucates a bit naturally over the time and depending on what you eat, do etc but don't think you can think yourself to more. Maybe you are really thinking about adrenaline?

Anyway the most interesting part about testosterone is that the natural production starts to decrease from about 25 and onwards. How old is Nadal again? He is going down!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
(Maxpower, I'm not sure if you really read my post or not. I never said a higher testosterone level REDUCES the cortisol level. I said, and I quote "in order to produce our best it is important that our testosterone level is high and our cortisol level is low". Comprehend yet? So that means ONE you want high [that's testosterone], and THE OTHER you want low [that's cortisol]. Still struggling? They are mutually exclusive.

"What we've seen in winners is huge testosterone-to-cortisol balance," Davis says. "When they're on their game, we see evidence that there may be an elevation of testosterone. When people are losing, they are overwhelmed with emotion. That's cortisol." - Psychologist Hap Davis
)
 

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We'll see we'll see, Nole may have overcome his nerves (and other issues) by now. ;)

Gluten-free diet works miracles btw. ;) Not sure it helps to reduce the cortisol level though. ;)
Gluten-free my [email protected]@@@. Fako is filled to the rim.
 

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(As we know, cortisol in the human body is a bad thing for athletes, because in order to produce our best it is important that our testosterone level is high and our cortisol level is low. Testosterone generates aggressive focus. Cortisol generates emotion and subsequent nervousness [generated by a focus on reward].

When I hear so many athletes focusing on winning titles or increasing their ranking, I sense that they have been encouraged to focus on the 'reward' which generates a high cortisol level [high emotionality]. So my question is, are ATP level coaches encouraging their players to have specific career goals [high ranking or number of titles]? If so, then I can see why so many players suffer from nerves in tight matches. Their cortisol level is too high)
You only get testosterone spike and cortisol fall during rest after a hard exercise but you need high cortisol to endure long and hard exercise, so you need both at different times and it's no problem if you have enough rest and maximum exertion during the game. The reward, drive and emotionality comes from dopamine, too much and too little dopamine is a problem that makes you lose focus and not have enough drive and lose interest in the improvement.
 

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(Maxpower, I'm not sure if you really read my post or not. I never said a higher testosterone level REDUCES the cortisol level. I said, and I quote "in order to produce our best it is important that our testosterone level is high and our cortisol level is low". Comprehend yet? So that means ONE you want high [that's testosterone], and THE OTHER you want low [that's cortisol]. Still struggling? They are mutually exclusive.


)
Still doesn't change my point because testosterone is not something you rule with your mind. It has more to do with your genes and your age. In fact i'd say stress hormones has too. Some ppl are naturally more nervous than others and get a way way way bigger effect when they get under pressure. Others are "adrenaline junkies" and get a kick out of death situations way more dangerous than a tennis match.

In the case of "nerve wracks" they normally can't get rid of it completly even if practice helps but what is most effective is taking medicine to block the receptors that order stress hormones to be produces. Many ppl that do stressful things like speaking in front of big audiences (compare to playing in front of a big audience) take such blockers. Other methods would be to use certain drugs that has a calming effect (Agassi im speaking about you!) that makes you less stressed. In case of tennis i think that is more for the stress about the crazy lifestyle/media than the actual matches.

But yes you are still overthinking this. If you want major effects you are speaking about doping and in case of stress hormones beta blockers/calming drugs and tennis players should never use such things even if some probably do.
 

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For some reason unbeknownst to me :rolleyes:, a mod deleted my post.
All I said is that OP apparently doesn't seem have any knowledge about endocrinology, which I happen to have some kind of a university degree in.

Good job, Mod-that-did-the-Evil-that-Man-do. :wavey:
 
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