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Who is greater?

  • Djokovic

    Votes: 12 50.0%
  • Borg

    Votes: 9 37.5%
  • Equal

    Votes: 3 12.5%

  • Total voters
    24
21 - 26 of 26 Posts

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Tennis is much more a global game these days, the competition has strengthened, the world's population has grown by 3.5 billion since Borng was in the midst of his Wimbledon success in 1978 meaning there's more people in theory taking up and competing to get the top in this game, back then it was largely American dominated, 11 of the top 20 end of year ranked players in 78 were from the US, with only 8 different nationalities, end of 2019 there was only 1 American in the top 20 (19th) and 16 different nationalities, most players in the top 20 now from 1 country is just 2, two Spanish, Russian, Italian and Swiss players.

It pointless comparing, too much has changed in terms of racquet technology, competition, balls used, court speed, slams changing surfaces etc. Borg also retired early so who knows how many he'd have ended up with.

Should only compare players within their own eras or at very least relatively close eras.
 

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Borg, easily



On the contrary, Borg played in a very strong grass era while Nole has benefited from homogenization

Djoker had to deal only with Clay Dominant Nadal and 500 years old Federer. Nole even in these days struggled with big servers like Querrey, how will he do vs Roscoe Tanner or Vitas Gerulaitis all other things being equal?
Excuse me but Novak is one of the Ieast to have "benefitted" & performed beyond "homogenization" w/ resuIts of muItipIe AO's, WTF's & WB's incIuding GoIden Masters onIy proving that he is 'arguabIy' the most proIific across most surfaces competing of his era so pIease don't confuse his resume w/ the MaIIorcan's.
 

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Excuse me but Novak is one of the Ieast to have "benefitted" & performed beyond "homogenization" w/ resuIts of muItipIe AO's, WTF's & WB's incIuding GoIden Masters onIy proving that he is 'arguabIy' the most proIific across most surfaces competing of his era so pIease don't confuse his resume w/ the MaIIorcan's.
Of course talking about grass tennis/Wimbledon becoming a game/tournament of the baseliners just like the rest. Since Hewitt/Nalbandian 2002, only baseliners in the finals.
 

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As for WB/Grass, over the course of time it may have changed but not 'artificiaIIy' (i.e. at USO) as much as naturaIIy. Furthermore, the Asian HC swing aIong w/ many other indoor courts where he hoIds muItipIe titIes arguabIy consist of the fastest bouncing courts.
 

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As for WB/Grass, over the course of time it may have changed but not 'artificiaIIy' (i.e. at USO) as much as naturaIIy. Furthermore, the Asian HC swing aIong w/ many other indoor courts where he hoIds muItipIe titIes arguabIy consist of the fastest bouncing courts.
If artificially means by design, it's one factor. Racquet/string tech is another.


Now into his third decade as Wimbledon's wizard of the grass, London resident Eddie Seaward has been grooming the magic carpets of the All England Lawn Tennis Club since the heydays of Steffi Graf and Pete Sampras. To the naked eye, his influence is difficult to detect; to the finely-tuned eyes of a touring tennis pro, the subtleties are immense.

Casual observers might think that Seaward is little more than a man with a shed full of Toro lawn mowers and some fertilizer at his disposal, but in addition to overseeing the upkeep and health of 19 grass courts for tournament play (and another 22 for practice), the seventh Head Groundsman in Wimbledon's history has facilitated changes that have influenced the way that the Wimbledon grass plays, and the types of players that can have success on the surface.

[...]

When a new generation of hard-hitting big servers reduced grass-court tennis to ace-a-thons in the early '90s, Seaward was paying attention.

"Everybody was saying grass courts are dead because they're too fast and it just favors the player who's got a hard serve," Seaward says. "I spoke to the coaches at the time and said, 'Well, OK, what do you want?' And so they told me."

He listened.

The results have been favorable for the majority of the players. "Hopefully we've achieved that because we're getting greater rallies now just by slowing the courts down a little bit," Seaward says confidently. "Most players are liking the courts the way they are."

[...]

The bounce has changed

Seaward's meticulous research has helped usher in a form of grass-court tennis that meshes very well with the game of the modern baseline player. Due to the 100% perennial ryegrass seed that has been in use at Wimbledon since 2001, the soil is drier, thus harder beneath the feet. This makes balls bounce higher, and the perceived speed of the court slower.

[...]

There are old-school purists who don't believe the equation is a winning one. They openly loathe the slowing of tennis' original and fastest surface, but the grass whisperer has an answer for them.

"You have to look at the overall picture as far as I'm concerned," said Seaward, in a phone interview from his office on the Wimbledon grounds. "If we can get the right sort of players, the clay-court players, the Agassis and the Nadals to come here, then that's going to be better for tennis and much better for the spectators, because they're seeing all the stars."
 

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I'm famiIiar w/ the contents of this articIe from another one describing it as a 'hybrid' strain differing from the type during Sampras' prime. At the end of the day, it's stiII a variety of Grass but probabIy aided CIaybots the most.
 
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