Mens Tennis Forums banner

1 - 20 of 73 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,241 Posts
Discussion Starter #1

I was skeptical of the allegations at first since they are hitting partners and seem to be friends, but the videos seem to show very intentional acts by Milkman. Thoughts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,003 Posts

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,828 Posts
We’ll try it this way cause I find it an interesting topic.

Yes, it’s suspicious and I find it quite stupid that it is against the laws of the USO, but not anywhere else. Tampering balls with your sweat in fact makes balls heavier and it is forbidden in Cricket for instance.

Why isn’t it forbidden anywhere outside the US in tennis? Gotta admit that I’ve been a bit disappointed by Millman although I’ve praised him the fortnite ago, after seeing those pics and videos when he deliberately did it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,733 Posts
We’ll try it this way cause I find it an interesting topic.

Yes, it’s suspicious and I find it quite stupid that it is against the laws of the USO, but not anywhere else. Tampering balls with your sweat in fact makes balls heavier and it is forbidden in Cricket for instance.

Why isn’t it forbidden anywhere outside the US in tennis? Gotta admit that I’ve been a bit disappointed by Millman although I’ve praised him the fortnite ago, after seeing those pics and videos when he deliberately did it.
But to be honest, we should expect nothing less. This is a war on the court and players will use any means possible to come out the victor. Taking long (or excessively short) to serve, bumping into someone, screaming, various gestures, tactical medical timeouts, challenges to waste time and kill the other guy's concentration, etc. That it's portrayed differently by the tennis authorities is just an illusion to create an image of the players as heroes and increase profit.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
8,828 Posts
But to be honest, we should expect nothing less. This is a war on the court and players will use any means possible to come out the victor. Taking long (or excessively short) to serve, bumping into someone, screaming, various gestures, tactical medical timeouts, challenges to waste time and kill the other guy's concentration, etc. That it's portrayed differently by the tennis authorities is just an illusion to create an image of the players as heroes and increase profit.
The quintessential point is that it’s banned in New York and a tolerated tactical ‘war’ (why are people so fond of wars these days?) instrument in Melbourne and anywhere else. It’s like picking out medical time outs for example: They will be now forbidden in Paris, but accepted outside of France. It should be taken into account that we’re witnessing the same sports in New York, Paris or Melbourne, so what’s the matter of all these irregularities and differences within the rules?

This makes it once again clear how absurd this - former known as gentlemen sport - is and worth to reflect on it in my eyes. Ofc it’s not big news, but you can ask the following question: Tampering balls with your sweat is forbidden in Cricket (for a reason) as there is a slight material change and is hence forbidden at the US Open, why not anywhere else? Or why just not remove that rule if it hasn’t significant impact?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,764 Posts
He tried everything he could to win and that’s why he was so upset to lose. He sounded like a broken man in the PC and even wrote on twitter “well that sucked”

I don’t blame him totally for doing this, but it’s definitely a bit of gamesmanship, currently legal outside of USO though, which doesn’t make sense. Millman on court coaching was so blatant tho, astounding he didn’t even get a warning.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,241 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
The quintessential point is that it’s banned in New York and a tolerated tactical ‘war’ (why are people so fond of wars these days?) instrument in Melbourne and anywhere else. It’s like picking out medical time outs for example: They will be now forbidden in Paris, but accepted outside of France. It should be taken into account that we’re witnessing the same sports in New York, Paris or Melbourne, so what’s the matter of all these irregularities and differences within the rules?

This makes it once again clear how absurd this - former known as gentlemen sport - is and worth to reflect on it in my eyes. Ofc it’s not big news, but you can ask the following question: Tampering balls with your sweat is forbidden in Cricket (for a reason) as there is a slight material change and is hence forbidden at the US Open, why not anywhere else? Or why just not remove that rule if it hasn’t significant impact?
thank you for realizing that moving this to the ruins was a mistake, although I stand by my statement that the original title was perfectly fine.
On topic, have you ever seen someone else do this before? I’ve never heard of this tactic before. Did Milkman do it against Rogie at the US Open when it was so hot and humid? I wonder how Rogie feels about this
 

·
Administrator | Chaos Theory
Joined
·
53,553 Posts
It's rubbish. You put balls in your pockets and they aren't getting slightly soaked? Over the course of the game your hands are sweaty and you are touching and bouncing the balls. It will affect both players, surely.

Let's not pretend it was just rubbing balls that made Millman drag Federer to 5 sets and a decisive super tiebreak.
 

·
Mostly unbiased analyst
Joined
·
3,982 Posts

I was skeptical of the allegations at first since they are hitting partners and seem to be friends, but the videos seem to show very intentional acts by Milkman. Thoughts?
Not illegal under the ITF rules that govern matches played at the AO
 
  • Like
Reactions: sav001

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,798 Posts
If this technique is actually legal outside the U.S. Open, why are some calling it "illegal" and "suspicious"?

Personally, I think it's a lame thing to do, but I don't see why a player should be penalized for it if the rules don't forbid it. Of course, that doesn't mean the fans themselves have to approve of it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,798 Posts
Let's not pretend it was just rubbing balls that made Millman drag Federer to 5 sets and a decisive super tiebreak.

That's the impression I'm getting—that this is almost a knee-jerk response to minimize how close the match was.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,241 Posts
Discussion Starter #15
It's rubbish. You put balls in your pockets and they aren't getting slightly soaked? Over the course of the game your hands are sweaty and you are touching and bouncing the balls. It will affect both players, surely.

Let's not pretend it was just rubbing balls that made Millman drag Federer to 5 sets and a decisive super tiebreak.
if you watch the videos it seems pretty clear that the ball rolling on his shirt is a very intentional act, as opposed to a ball getting damp by being touched by a sweaty hand or being in a sweaty pocket. Are you telling me that you don’t see the difference?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,186 Posts
Interesting that Federer can't handle heavy balls
As for the intentional act of rubbing the balls against the shirt, it's shady but effective, and I actually like it
 
1 - 20 of 73 Posts
Top