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Discussion Starter #1
http://www.wsj.com/articles/SB10001424052702304569504576403621816379188

However, of more concern to those players, such as Andy Roddick and Andy Murray, who thrive on the pace of the grass-court game, is that conditions under the roof are likely to favour those who prefer the comparatively pedestrian speed of the clay.

"The roof changes the conditions and if anything it's almost too perfect," Murray said after his first-round victory over Daniel Gimeno-Traver under the roof. "It's different grass-court tennis." The statistics bear Murray's theory out. The measurable slowing of the ball under the roof is indisputable thanks to another technological advance—Hawk-Eye.

"Due to the increase in humidity when the roof is closed, balls are heavier and travel slightly slower through the air," Pete Irwin, one of Hawk-Eye's experts at Wimbledon this week, said.


The court will actually slow down if the roof is closed... just because Federer won under a roof in 2012 doesn't mean the conditions necessarily suit him, and Djokovic has won like 31 straight indoor. Of course indoor grass is different, but it doesn't favor Federer. Don't want to hear excuses from tards from either fanbase if their hero loses tommorow...
 

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has Eggovic played under the roof at wimbledon before?
 

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has Eggovic played under the roof at wimbledon before?
If I remember well, the semifinal played in 2012 (which he lost) against Federer was played under the roof. But not sure
 

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Novak is actually great indoors, and agree with courts speed being different under the roof, with sunny day i believe it plays quicker than under the roof with humidity, it gives advantage to Roger´s serve - which is great weapon, but also it gives some advantage to Novak - his own serve can be better with no wind + in rallies with no elements he can play better baseline tennis i believe.

Both guys have advantages indoors
 

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If I remember well, the semifinal played in 2012 (which he lost) against Federer was played under the roof. But not sure
Yes. He's also played other great matches under the roof: that 5-setter against Olivier Rochus in 2010 comes to mind.
 

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This isn't taking into account the height of the bounce. Though the ball might move more slowly, the added humidity probably makes the bounce lower.

Added humidity makes the grass more slippery and difficult to move on. This clearly favors Federer as Djokovic is not a natural mover on the surface.
 

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Discussion Starter #12 (Edited)
This isn't taking into account the height of the bounce. Though the ball might move more slowly, the added humidity probably makes the bounce lower.

Added humidity makes the grass more slippery and difficult to move on. This clearly favors Federer as Djokovic is not a natural mover on the surface.
False.

It will bounce higher which favors Djokovic.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/te...d-changed-the-ball-says-rocket-scientist.html

But Mark Kidger, who combines his work in aerospace engineering with writing books such as The Physics of Cricket, told Telegraph Sport that the condition of the ball was the critical factor.

“The roof traps the humidity inside the court,” Kidger explained. “You’ve got 15,000 people inside, all breathing and sweating away, and then there is the moist surface of the grass, which will be releasing more water vapour into the atmosphere.

“The ball will suck in some of that water vapour and so become a little bit heavier and slower, both through the air and especially off the court. When it bounces, it will sit up nicely to be hit rather than rushing through as normal.

Admittedly, Djokovic will probably slip more on the grass and his movement will suffer a little. However, higher humidity would mean in more sweating - making it more physical a match which favors Djokovic given their ages (Assuming Djokovic doesn't revert back to 2009 where he retires from physical problems but he has become superhuman fit in recent years)
 

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debunking the debunking - wetter ball travels faster through the surface and bounces lower.

Which is enough advantage for players going at the net more often and prefering shorter rallies, using slice, etc.

It goes slightly slower through the air, but faster through the surface and for sure, and most importantly - stays lower.

Might be different for cricket though, i reckon.. :rolleyes:
 

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I always knew there was something behind 2012 W loss. I was searching for an external factor for so long.... for such a long time. I'm glad to find out the roof was closed. Djokovic still unbeaten without external factors.
 

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It definitely plays slower with the roof closed due to the increased humidity and moisture - this has been seen in previous years. These slower and heavier conditions will make it harder to hit winners and this will definitely favor Djokovic.

On the other hand, playing under the roof will mean no wind, which tends to favor the more aggressive player which is definitely Federer.

If they play in the open, as they are supposed to, it will be cool, cloudy damp and breezy tomorrow with a forecast temp of 18C and overcast conditions - don't think it will play fast either way.
 

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Anybody who has played the game, knows that under artificial light, the ball APPEARS to move more quickly. It is an optical illusion of course, but it DOES make it a little more difficult to return a fast serve.

Since Fed and Djokovic's serves are about the same speed, I don't see any advantage for either player.
 
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