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Masks save lives, but only if the mask is bullet-proof and you are wearing it when Dick Cheney shoots you in the face.
Almost 10,000 new cases in Florida alone yesterday. I wonder how many were caused by spreaders not wearing masks in public. I wonder how many of the 10,000 will die without being shot anywhere.
And the NBA wants to put all the NBA teams in Florida In 10 days time.
I suppose because they see how well the PGA bubble is working, LOL.

And Trump just keeps fiddling and tweeting about anything but America’s biggest problem.
 

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Almost 10,000 new cases in Florida alone yesterday. I wonder how many were caused by spreaders not wearing masks in public. I wonder how many of the 10,000 will die without being shot anywhere.
And the NBA wants to put all the NBA teams in Florida In 10 days time.
I suppose because they see how well the PGA bubble is working, LOL.

And Trump just keeps fiddling and tweeting about anything but America’s biggest problem.
Holy shit, 10k on Florida alone. I didn't know it had gotten that bad. Even UK at its peak wasn't even getting that
 

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Haven't the experts concluded catching the virus outdoors is extremely low?

Why is it spreading outdoors?
Low, if you are socially distancing. Although, while walking along Toronto’s waterfront on a nice breezy day, I have wondered if 2m are enough.

Not low if you are on a packed beach And nobody in masks. Florida is wising up now. The beaches will be closed on July 4th. Expect to see lots of "freedom lovers" on the beaches.
 

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Weekly Death Toll:

21 Feb: 2,360
28 Feb: 2,923 (+563) rate of change:
06 Mar: 3,493 (+571) x1.01
13 Mar: 5,427 (+1,934) x3.39
20 Mar: 11,452 (+6,025) x3.13
27 Mar: 28,165 (+16,713) x2.77
03 Apr: 61,557 (+33,392) x2.00
10 Apr: 108,093 (+46,536) x1.39
17 Apr: 156,836 (+48,743) x1.05
24 Apr: 201,297(+44,461) x0.91
01 May: 240,679 (+39,382) x0.89
08 May: 277,451 (+36,772) x0.93
15 May: 309,960 (+32,509) x0.88
22 May: 340,201 (+30,241) x0.93
29 May: 369,622 (+29,421) x0.97
05 Jun: 400,267 (+30,645) x1.04
12 Jun: 430,705 (+30,438) x0.99
19 Jun: 463,781 (+33,076) x1.09
26 Jun: 496,077 (+32,296) x0.98

Global death rate has remained pretty constant for many weeks, falls or flat growth in European nations and steady decline in the USA death figures, though the heightening cases may change that, and rises in death rate once more in Brazil, Mexico, Peru, India, Chile, Pakistan and a small amount in Iran and Russia.
 

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Holy shit, 10k on Florida alone. I didn't know it had gotten that bad. Even UK at its peak wasn't even getting that
The Florida bashing has become more of a joke though. They have probably been the most critizised state for never really implementing any strict measures and therefore received the full dose of bullshitting by the media (which was obviously predicting an absolute catastrophy that never came). Now (months after originally being totally wrong) they are of course more than happy to finally have something remotely bad to report about that state, claiming they have seen it long before.

Though, particularly for a state that has AFAIN never implemented any strict measure, they have been doing absolutely fantastic.

Deaths per Million:
Florida: 157
And here some European Countries as a reference:
UK: 655
Spain: 607
Italy: 575
Germany: 108


The most ironic thing is obviously criticism from the NY governeur ("New York Gov. Cuomo to other states: ‘You played politics with this virus, and you lost’") which is basically the most hypocritical thing you will ever see.

That guy has a rate of 1,593 (!) deaths per million in his state which is by huge margin higher than in any country in the world and more than ten times as much (!) as Florida, the state he is attempting to criticize here.
 
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The Florida bashing has become more of a joke though. They have probably been the most critizised state for never really implementing any strict measures and therefore received the full dose of bullshitting by the media (which was obviously predicting an absolute catastrophy that never came). Now (months after originally being totally wrong) they are of course more than happy to finally have something remotely bad to report about that state, claiming they have seen it long before.

Though, particularly for a state that has AFAIN never implemented any strict measure, they have been doing absolutely fantastic.

[...]

Florida will begin reopening its economy on Monday. Gov. Ron DeSantis says all of the state except for three counties in Southeast Florida meet the Phase 1 guidelines identified by the White House Coronavirus Task Force.

A statewide shelter-in-place order expires Thursday, but DeSantis says people should continue to practice social distancing and not socialize in groups larger than 10. He's also asked those who are medically vulnerable and the elderly to remain at home as much as possible.
In a news conference at the state Capitol in Tallahassee, the governor said he was signing an executive order that allows restaurants and retail stores to reopen Monday, May 4. Restaurants will be able to use outdoor seating. Inside, they'll be able in the first phase of the state's plan to use just 25% of their seating capacity.

Schools will remain closed and students will continue distance learning. Large venues, including movie theaters also remain closed for now, as do personal service establishments like barber shops and beauty salons. DeSantis says elective surgeries can resume statewide.
The action in Florida takes a middle approach, less aggressive than states such as Georgia, but beginning to reopen an economy that's been largely dormant for well over a month. DeSantis said, "I deliberately erred on the side of taking measured steps, kind of even a baby step to ... start us on a road to a brighter day."

The order excludes Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties where the majority of Florida's coronavirus cases have occurred. Shelter-in-place orders and business closures remain in place in those three counties.
 

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Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children in New York State

Globally and in New York State, initial reports indicated that children typically have mild or no Covid-19 symptoms and have lower rates of hospitalization and death than adults. However, in early May, the United Kingdom and several European countries reported the occurrence of a hyperinflammatory process in children that had features similar to atypical Kawasaki’s disease, Kawasaki’s disease shock syndrome, and toxic shock syndrome, possibly related to SARS-CoV-2 infection.





Between January 1 and May 10, 2020, the NYSDOH received reports of 15,515 cases of SARS-CoV-2 infection detected by reverse-transcriptase–polymerase-chain-reaction (RT-PCR) assay among children and adolescents younger than 21 years of age; 816 patients (5%) were hospitalized with acute Covid-19, and 14 (0.1%) died.
CLINICAL COURSE, TREATMENT, AND OUTCOMES

Overall, 79 patients (80%) were admitted to an intensive care unit (ICU) (median time from admission to ICU entry, <1 day; interquartile range, 0 to 1), and 10 (10%) received mechanical ventilation. The median time from symptom onset to hospital admission was 4 days (interquartile range, 3 to 6) (Table 4). Of 60 patients with examinations for troponin and proBNP levels, an electrocardiogram, and an echocardiogram, 59 had evidence of cardiac abnormalities. Of 90 patients who underwent computed tomography (CT) or radiography of the chest, 35 (39%) had at least one opacity noted. Of 44 patients who underwent CT of the abdomen, ultrasonography of the abdomen, or both, 34 (77%) had abnormal findings; 4 (9%) had hepatomegaly, splenomegaly, or hepatosplenomegaly, 8 (18%) had mesenteric adenopathy, 16 (36%) had ascites, pleural effusions, or pelvic fluid, and 17 (39%) had inflammation or enlargement of the appendix (in 2 patients) or the gallbladder (in 5), enteritis or enterocolitis (in 3), bowel-wall thickening (in 7), or fluid-filled bowel loops (in 4).

A total of 36 patients (36%) received a diagnosis of Kawasaki’s disease or atypical (or incomplete) Kawasaki’s disease; 7 of the 9 patients with coronary-artery aneurysms also received a diagnosis of Kawasaki’s disease. A total of 36 patients (36%) received a diagnosis of myocarditis, and an additional 16 (16%) had clinical myocarditis. As of May 15, a total of 76 patients (77%) had been discharged and 21 (21%) were still hospitalized; 2 (2%) died in the hospital. The median length of stay was 6 days (interquartile range, 4 to 9) overall, 6 days (interquartile range, 4 to 8) among patients who were discharged, and 7 days (interquartile range, 3 to 11) among those who died.

Death occurred in two children 0 to 12 years of age. Both were admitted with abdominal pain and fever, had tachycardia and hypotension on presentation, and during the course of their hospitalization received vasopressor support and underwent intubation;
https://www.nejm.org/doi/full/10.1056/NEJMoa2021756?source=nejmtwitter&medium=organic-social&fbclid=IwAR01ZCGvsvshX8W5QF5kB6GA_ycvWyZod4LaBBVT_gly-DlnhVwXplCvCQw
 

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I guess "never implemented strict measures" can be interpreted as slightly inaccurate, but anyway, it wasn't really relevant for my main point so I didn't bother looking up the details there.
 

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Discussion Starter #2,473
Britain has the wrong government for the covid crisis



It has played a bad hand badly

There was a lot going on in Britain in early March. London staged an England-Wales rugby match on March 7th, which the prime minister attended along with a crowd of 81,000; on March 11th Liverpool played Atletico Madrid, in front of a crowd of 52,000 fans, including 3,000 from Spain; 252,000 punters went to the Cheltenham Festival, one of the country’s poshest steeplechase meetings, which ended on March 13th.

As Britons were getting together to amuse themselves and infect each other, Europe was shutting down. Borders were closing, public gatherings being banned. Italy went into full lockdown on March 9th, Denmark on March 11th, Spain on March 14th and France on March 17th. Britain followed only on March 23rd.

Putting in place sweeping restrictions on everyday life was a difficult decision, fraught with uncertainty. Yet the delay is just one example of the government’s tardiness. Britain has been slow to increase testing, identify a contact-tracing app, stop visits to care homes, ban big public events, provide its health workers with personal protective equipment (PPE), and require people to wear face coverings on public transport. As this wave of the disease ebbs, Britons are wondering how they came to have the highest overall death rate of any country in the rich world, and why leaving lockdown is proving so difficult.

The evidence so far suggests that the British government played a bad hand badly. The country was always going to struggle. The virus took off in London, an international hub. Britain has a high proportion of ethnic-minority people, who are especially vulnerable to the disease. And Britons are somewhat overweight, which exacerbates the impact of the infection.

Britain has got some things right. Its researchers have been in the forefront of the race to find drugs and create vaccines against the disease. On June 16th a trial by Oxford University, the first to identify a life-saving medicine, showed that a cheap steroid can reduce mortality among the sickest patients by a third. A swift reorganisation of the National Health Service put paid to fears that it would be overwhelmed. But the government has wasted the most precious commodity in a crisis: time. In a federal system, like America’s, the central government’s failings can be mitigated by state and local authorities. In a centralised system, they cannot.

Hindsight is a fine thing, and offers a clarity that is absent in the blizzard of events. Yet it is now plain that Britain’s scientists initially argued for the wrong approach: accepting that the disease would spread through the population, while protecting the vulnerable and the health service. Neil Ferguson, an epidemiologist at Imperial College London, estimates that had Britain locked down a week earlier, at least half of the 50,000-or-so lives that have been lost would have been saved. This is more Britons than have died in any event since the second world war.

In retrospect, the government should have probed the scientists’ advice more deeply. Some of it was questionable. The received wisdom that people would tire of social distancing, and that shutting down early would mean loosening early too, was just a hunch. Even after the evidence changed, and it became clear the country was heading for catastrophe, the government was slow to impose the sort of lockdown seen across Europe.

Yet you do not need hindsight to identify other mistakes. Delays in fixing PPE supply chains, promoting face coverings and increasing testing capacity were clearly errors at the time. Despite the urging of the country’s scientists and the World Health Organisation, by the middle of April Britain was still carrying out just 12,000 tests a day, compared with 44,000 in Italy and 51,000 in Germany. Because most testing was reserved for hospitals, care homes struggled to find out which of their residents and staff were infected. Competition for PPE was fierce, so they also struggled to get the kit they needed to protect their workers.

The government is not solely to blame. The pandemic made new demands on the system. Some crucial bits of machinery did not work. The publicly owned company which supplies the health service with PPE failed. Public Health England, which was responsible for testing and tracing, failed. But there was a failure of leadership, too. When systems break it is the government’s job to mend them; when the evidence argues for drastic measures ministers need to take them.

Britain is still living with the consequences. The spread of the virus and the devastation it has wrought have made leaving lockdown difficult, as shown by the halting return of pupils to school. Only five year-groups have gone back, many parents are choosing to keep their children at home, and the government has abandoned an earlier ambition to get more in. The “world-beating” contact-tracing system still lacks its app, which is not due to arrive until winter. Slow progress at suppressing the virus will have grave economic consequences, too.

These shortcomings have claimed many victims. Among them is public trust. Britain went into this crisis with a powerful sense of unity and goodwill towards the government. Now Britons think worse of their government’s performance during the crisis than do the citizens of any of 22 countries polled by YouGov, aside from Mexico. That reflects the government’s mistakes and its hypocrisy, after the prime minister’s main adviser broke its own rules about when to travel—and kept his job. While the world waits for a vaccine this lack of trust will make managing the disease a lot harder.

The painful conclusion is that Britain has the wrong sort of government for a pandemic—and, in Boris Johnson, the wrong sort of prime minister. Elected in December with the slogan of “Get Brexit Done”, he did not pay covid-19 enough attention. Ministers were chosen on ideological grounds; talented candidates with the wrong views were left out in the cold. Mr Johnson got the top job because he is a brilliant campaigner and a charismatic entertainer with whom the Conservative Party fell in love. Beating the coronavirus calls for attention to detail, consistency and implementation, but they are not his forte.

The pandemic has many lessons for the government, which the inevitable public inquiry will surely clarify. Here is one for voters: when choosing a person or party to vote for, do not underestimate the importance of ordinary, decent competence.
 

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At the senate hearings.

Fauci: When I am asked for an opinion, I give it based on the scientific knowledge available.
Sen. Rand Paul: What we want to hear from you is optimism.

I was really hoping Fauci would say, "OK, there will be 15 more cases and Covid will disappear by tomorrow."
But he didn’t.
 

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the situation we are in is too delicate and serious and yet people tend to not take it seriously... They prefer to underestimate the virus and hope that it will pass them. I see people gatherings of 5, 8, 9 with no masks on and being much closer than one feet from each other.. As for me I bought a whole pack of KN95 masks at once and have with me everytime i go out at least 2 of them, just in case. I really don't get why people cannot think of others and for their safety wear at least masks?
 
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