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Discussion Starter #1
The promising young American tennis player Ryan Harrison behaves like an ill-mannered, self-absorbed, ego-inflated spoiled brat as he emerges onto the world stage --- as example, look at his behavior during the first round match at the US Open. The last thing American tennis needs is a boorish and hot-headed Baby Roddick.

Before it's too late, can anyone in his organization or fan base get him to change his horrid and embarrassing displays of poor sportsmanship? Such a turn-off and likely to cost him a great loss in fan support and multi-million dollars in endorsements.
 

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leave him be. strong personalities are needed in the sport. nothing wrong with a little emotion on the court as long as it is respectful to the other players.

the only thing he is lacking or missing is the winning which may come. he has to start spending some time on clay if he wants to develop further as a player.
 

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He will still get multi-millions of dollars in endorsements. He is a 19 year old American tennis player in the top 70 and going further up.

How could he not?
 

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In terms of endorsements, if the kid wins, then that will come either way as the US is desperate for any sign of a future champion. The American media couldn't care less about tennis at the moment, as you would hardly even know that the US Open is going on right now, and you can't even see any of the matches in the US Master's Series events prior to the SFs (unless the 0.0 TV ratings Tennis Channel is showing it). As I've said a million times, the USA is a very self-loathing country, so half of the fans domestically will hate you no matter how you act anyway (if you do nothing then you're "boring" like Sampras, if you smile too much then you don't care, etc).

I really don't believe that Harrison has the mean-spirited nature of Roddick. He can be bratty, sure, but what 19 year old isn't?
 

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Also, in a really crazy way, I feel that the last few weeks are actually very encouraging for Ryan. When you are serving at ~40% with double digit DFs per match and are still winning (or playing guys like Cilic close), then that has to be a positive sign for when your serve becomes better down the road.

Choking, however, tends to run in a player's blood and never leaves. Unlike other things where past experience helps, I have found that choking early in one's career is generally a sign that much more choking is to come throughout the entirety of one's career.
 

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Magnus.
Norman.

leave him be. strong personalities are needed in the sport. nothing wrong with a little emotion on the court as long as it is respectful to the other players.
Fail. It's also important to respect the officials, and behave like an adult on court.
 

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There is a difference between showing emotion and fight, and just being a total dickhead. Sadly, at the moment Harrison is the latter. Extremely talented individual with an appalling attitude.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Also, in a really crazy way, I feel that the last few weeks are actually very encouraging for Ryan. When you are serving at ~40% with double digit DFs per match and are still winning (or playing guys like Cilic close), then that has to be a positive sign for when your serve becomes better down the road.

Choking, however, tends to run in a player's blood and never leaves. Unlike other things where past experience helps, I have found that choking early in one's career is generally a sign that much more choking is to come throughout the entirety of one's career.

Playing well is one thing, behaving well is another. Tennis is a gentlemen's sport in which polite on-court manners are required if one wants to be admired.

Consider the esteem fans have for well-behaved players such as Bjorn Borg, Chris Evert, Arthur Ashe, Pete Sampras, Martina Navratilova, Rafael Nadal, Caroline Wozniacki, and Roger Federer.

So far, Ryan Harrison falls far below the classy standards of those icons --- but it's not too late to change if someone can get him to understand that he is working against his best interests by behaving so badly on court.
 

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Playing well is one thing, behaving well is another. Tennis is a gentlemen's sport in which polite on-court manners are required if one wants to be admired.

Consider the esteem fans have for well-behaved players such as Bjorn Borg, Chris Evert, Arthur Ashe, Pete Sampras, Martina Navratilova, Rafael Nadal, Caroline Wozniacki, and Roger Federer.

So far, Ryan Harrison falls far below the classy standards of those icons --- but it's not too late to change if someone can get him to understand that he is working against his best interests by behaving so badly on court.
I couldn't agree more. Tennis historically has been and hopefully will continue to be the ultimate gentleman's sport. You gave some great examples with many of my favorites listed, as sportsmanship now might be as high as it has ever been (even while greater society seems to get trashier by the day).

My only counter question would be why do we as Americans hold our own to higher standards than everyone else?? When Fernando Gonzalez breaks his rackets, lies about the ball hitting his racquet (at the Olympics, no less), or hits balls directly at Stepanek without even apologizing, we just say "Oh, he's South American, and lets just understand that that's the way that (they) are," or something to that effect. No Argentine would ever dare to apoligize to the world, as they all rally 100% behind their players no matter how they act (even the convicted dopers). It's even considered rude to question a foreign player's bad behavior, as we are supposed to sympathize with his being raised in a culture that doesn't value better etiquette. Perhaps this is a greater societal question that belongs elsewhere, as you could even say the same thing in terms of expecting higher standards from "white Americans" than immigrants.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Yes. End the mentor/mentee relationship with Roddick. :p
Absolutely, especially since his mentor Roddick wants tennis to abandon its' polite "stuffy" behavior and become more like the raunchy 'sport' of raw-wrestling.

http://www.sportsgrid.com/tennis/andy-roddick-wrestling-ratings-video/

Btw, it's likely that less than 5% of the audience that watches tennis would ever also watch raw-wrestling --- and vice verse. Ryan, get smart and ditch your so-called mentor Roddick
 

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Give him a break, Federer and Djokovic were also brats when they were young. Just check out the "when you became fans of (player X)" threads in their player forum here and you will see. Federer especially has had a huge transformation in attitude.
 

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I couldn't agree more. Tennis historically has been and hopefully will continue to be the ultimate gentleman's sport. You gave some great examples with many of my favorites listed, as sportsmanship now might be as high as it has ever been (even while greater society seems to get trashier by the day).

My only counter question would be why do we as Americans hold our own to higher standards than everyone else?? When Fernando Gonzalez breaks his rackets, lies about the ball hitting his racquet (at the Olympics, no less), or hits balls directly at Stepanek without even apologizing, we just say "Oh, he's South American, and lets just understand that that's the way that (they) are," or something to that effect. No Argentine would ever dare to apoligize to the world, as they all rally 100% behind their players no matter how they act (even the convicted dopers). It's even considered rude to question a foreign player's bad behavior, as we are supposed to sympathize with his being raised in a culture that doesn't value better etiquette. Perhaps this is a greater societal question that belongs elsewhere, as you could even say the same thing in terms of expecting higher standards from "white Americans" than immigrants.
I have no direct evidence of this but I think it's because in the U.S. fans of tennis tend to be wealthier and part of the "elite" class. They tend to be more snobby about behavior than the average fan would be in other countries.

I don't even think the average American sports fan cares whether Roddick or Serena or McEnroe or Connors screamed at officials; only the tennis establishment really cares.

I don't care about someone having a temper if it helps the player focus and win, but in Harrison's case it seems like it's a net negative on his game so he needs to learn how to focus more.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
He is so young. Give him some time. I think he is a great player. :)
He's so young? Most kids are able to learn good sportsmanship at age 8 or 9 --- at a decade older, Harrison must be quite a slow learner and is hardly young in this regard.

:sad::sad::sad:
 

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http://www.grantland.com/story/_/id/6904753/the-john-mcenroe

This temper — his camp prefers "competitiveness" — showed up in the third game against Troicki: Harrison lofted his racket high into the air and let it thud against the ground. He had just lost nine of the match's first 10 points. Harrison retrieved his racket, then walked to the baseline and hit a service winner. Then he hit another. On the next point, Harrison leapt into a full sprint to reach a Troicki drop shot and poke it back for a winner. After his outburst, Harrison won six of the next seven points.

I began tallying his eruptions. There were 11, including another racket throw, a racket slam, and an enraged "Unbelievable!" Harrison won eight of the 11 subsequent points. Percentage-wise, it had become more advantageous for Harrison to berate himself than to make his first serve. Late in the first set, down a break, Harrison hit an easy return into the net. "I hit that slower than I've ever hit a ball in my life," he yelled. Holt turned to me: "Here comes a big return." On the next point, Harrison slammed a backhand return down the line. He won the point.
It helps him :shrug: so keep it up Ryan :yeah:
 

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Here are the comments about Fed in 2004:

"I first noticed him in Marseilles, I think it was in 2000 or 2001 (can't remember) when he played Rosset in the final there. At first I didn't think all that much about him coz he had a quick temper and was very erratic."

"Who? Oh yeah, that guy in the headband whom I saw briefly at RG shouting and throwing temper tantrums and digging himself a grave against Corretja in the quarters (this was all I'd ever seen or heard of Federer before then, and my only impression was that he was far too petulant)."

"2002 was incredibly frustrating, though, full of great highs and equally great lows. The main presenter we have over here on Sky Sports was never that impressed with what he saw as Federer's apathetic attitude - he's singing a different tune now, of course - and was always slamming him after early-round losses, saying someone needed to give him a kick up the backside. I could see his point, given that Federer's emotionless demeanour can make it look like he's tanking when he's losing."

"Last year it was Nalbandian that was the big frustration, his ability to read Federer's game perfectly and Federer's inability to change things around. That US Open loss was the last straw - he went in talking tough about being motivated for the match, saying it was time he beat him, that he was going to try something different... and there was no evidence of that at all. Instead he notched up over 60 unforced errors, insisted on serve-volleying every first serve when he was getting killed on the returns, and let control of the match slip away from him."
 

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In terms of endorsements, if the kid wins, then that will come either way as the US is desperate for any sign of a future champion. The American media couldn't care less about tennis at the moment, as you would hardly even know that the US Open is going on right now, and you can't even see any of the matches in the US Master's Series events prior to the SFs (unless the 0.0 TV ratings Tennis Channel is showing it). As I've said a million times, the USA is a very self-loathing country, so half of the fans domestically will hate you no matter how you act anyway (if you do nothing then you're "boring" like Sampras, if you smile too much then you don't care, etc).

I really don't believe that Harrison has the mean-spirited nature of Roddick. He can be bratty, sure, but what 19 year old isn't?
I have to agree with you
 
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