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This is from ESPN: http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/blog/index?entryID=3264207&name=tennis

U.S. missing the boatby: Peter Bodo, TENNIS.com
posted: Monday, February 25, 2008 | Feedback | Print Entry
filed under: Tennis

I just returned from a family vacation to the Central American nation of Costa Rica, a nation whose highest-ranking player on the ATP computer is Juan Antonio Marin (hi, Juan!), at No. 1135.


At noon one day, I walked into the bar of our hotel at Playa Carillo beach. The obligatory soccer game was on the television, and the obligatory three bar flies were enjoying their nooners, listlessly watching one of those weird international events in soccer -- The Champions Runner-Up Champions Cup or something …



I sat nearby with half an eye on the tube and I was surprised to see that over next forty minutes or so, the network (ESPN, natch) ran two full-blown, lengthy promotional spots: one for the NFL and the other for -- tennis. If you had just landed on planet earth, you'd be forgiven for thinking that they were sports of equal status and appeal.



And guess what? They just might be -- at least outside the States, where the long-awaited paradigm shift elevating tennis to a major sport has already occurred. Isn't it funny that here in the States, nothing -- not the populist histrionics of Jimmy Connors, the dramatic prowess of John McEnroe, the fiery socio-political agenda of Billie Jean King, not even the flat-out talent and accomplishments of Pete Sampras -- has managed to catapult tennis out of the niche-sport ghetto?



When you look at the growth and popularity of tennis outside the U.S., it's pretty easy to conclude that we've missed the boat -- kind of like those stock analysts who advised their clients to stay away from the Asian markets.



China? Pfffttt … Never happen.



Something similar is happening in tennis. While the game in the U.S. is struggling (in terms of producing talent, if not in staging tournaments and luring people like Maria Sharapova to come live and train here), the game everywhere else is flourishing. Just look at the tournaments played last week: The ATP had big events in San Jose, Calif., Buenos Aires and Rotterdam, with the top talent pretty evenly spread between them (Andy Roddick played San Jose, Rafael Nadal was in Rotterdam and David Nalbandian labored in BA). The WTA ladies had two tournaments, with the one in Santander, Colombia, overshadowed by the big event in Doha, Qatar.



So of the five main events last week, just one was played in the U.S. and the most meaningful and prestigious of the events took place in the Middle East (Qatar). This would hardly be worth a raised eyebrow were if not for the fact that in tennis, the U.S. was not only there first with a tournament and player infrastructure, it also all but single-handedly created the entire Open-era infrastructure for the game. It all seems to have slipped away.



It's hard for me to get too worked up about the failure of soccer to take hold here in the States because it never really was "our" game in any meaningful sense. But tennis was our game -- no less than football or basketball. In fact, right into the 1980s, it was almost exclusively our game. We not only had the top players, we also had the most important events and the expertise to export. But things changed, seemingly in the blink of an eye. Globally, tennis has won the credibility it has yet to attain here in the states.



Tennis is the great athletic success story of the late 20th Century, but we'll be the last to know.
 

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I wonder how much Bodo got payed for this.
 

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Globally, tennis has won the credibility it has yet to attain here in the states.



Tennis is the great athletic success story of the late 20th Century, but we'll be the last to know.
Frankly I have no idea what you are talking about. I personaly started following tennis again mostly thanks to Federer, but I don't think tennis "credibility" is any higher than it was, say, ten years ago. Actualy I think it's lower. I mean the kind of respect Agassi or Sampras were getting is matched by no one today, including Nadal (who is maybe the closest to being a true star of the current players).
Take the example of Federer, who despite all his successes tends to be seen as 'a no one' by most people
 

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Espn has some nerve, seeing ass their refusal to air it as a legitimate sport ahead of paintball, darts & little league baseball & fishing.
That is a big reason nobody in the U.S could even get interested in tennis if they wanted to.
 

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From: http://www.norcal.usta.com/NEWS/fullstory.sps?iNewsid=517385&itype=1941
2007 - A Record Year for Tennis
12/21/07 6:20 PM

Records Set for US Open Attendance and US Open Series TV Viewership
Number of People Playing Tennis Tops 25 Million
U.S. Captures Davis Cup Title for First Time in 12 Years

WHITE PLAINS, N.Y., December 20, 2007 -- The USTA today announced that the sport of tennis in the United States grew on every level in 2007 - - from local communities to the highest level of the professional game. One of the strongest years in nearly two decades, tennis in the U.S. set records in event attendance, television viewership and recreational participation. Record highlights include:


All-Time US Open Attendance Record: The 2007 US Open final attendance total of 715,587far surpassed the previous all-time high of 659,538 set in 2005. US Open attendance has grown by more than 100,000 since 2000. Total attendance of all pro tennis events in North America topped 2.8 million.

Record-Breaking Viewership for US Open Series: US Open Series television viewership topped 46 million for the first time, more than doubling in the four years since the Series launch. In total, 121 million viewers tuned in to the US Open and US Open Series tournaments.

Fastest-Growing Participation of any Major Sport Since 2000: More than 25 million Americans are now playing tennis. This increase in participation has fueled the four best consecutive years of growth for industry sales since the 1970’s.

All-Time High USTA and USTA Northern California Membership: More than 720,000 members for the first time in history, and a record high of 46,511 members in USTA Northern California.

United States Wins Davis Cup: The U.S. captured its first Davis Cup title in 12 years. “The USTA has a longstanding commitment to grow the game at every level,” said Jane Brown Grimes, President and Chairman of the Board, USTA. “It is very encouraging to see so many record-breaking numbers, proving that tennis is again on the rise in the U.S. From the game’s grassroots to the professional level, we have tremendous momentum heading into 2008.”

“We will remember 2007 as a great year for tennis - - with more people attending, watching and playing the sport,” said Arlen Kantarian, CEO, Professional Tennis, USTA. “Professional tennis in the U.S. is setting new records and is strongly positioned to further engage fans in 2008 and beyond. We, along with our key partners, will continue to look for new, innovative ways to showcase and grow the game.”


“Our goal is to get more people playing tennis, and to get all tennis players playing more often,” said Kurt Kamperman, Chief Executive, Community Tennis, USTA. “Record participation and membership numbers are evidence that our efforts are producing results. We’ll be launching new and exciting grassroots initiatives in the coming year to keep those numbers growing.”
 

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i don't get why people keep referring to the middle east tournaments as new icons of tennis culture. heck, those countries are in no way a real competition because

1) they build these tournaments from scratch an amass tons of debt during the build-up that is never gonna be refinanced properly. but they don't need to care because sheikh al-halabad-bin-holadi-whatever just open his wallet and billions come out to "repair" the damage. this is how people over their understand capitalism. and frankly, no western country handles problems like this, thank god. it's simply ridiculous feudal decadence, not economics. if this is the future, the west hopefully just resign from this sort of crap. let them do their thing, i don't care, i don't wanna have anything do with it.

b) the audience numbbers are miserable. doha, dubai etc. is a joke when it comes to atmosphere, reception and overall attendance and it's not likely to change. as there's no middle class whatsoever but just multi-millionaires and 70% poor indian or pakistani workhorses, there is just no target group to sell tennis to in a proper way.

and if i was a tennis pro like roger, making 10 mil a year from playing alone, i'd be ashamed if i turned up in dubai every year to make some sheikh happy who whips his wives (!), let's people lapidate others or refuses to let israeli citizens into the country. it's a disgrace, big time.

and one day people will stand up, trust me.
 

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Yeah Federer training in Dubaï during the winter is quite a disgrace. As a fellow (half)swiss myself I would rather see him play in places where people give a f*** about his tennis, not only because he's famous.
 

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Yeah Federer training in Dubaï during the winter is quite a disgrace. As a fellow (half)swiss myself I would rather see him play in places where people give a f*** about his tennis, not only because he's famous.
:yeah: right, he definitely should practise in Gstaad or St. Moritz in Winter instead... :retard:
 

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Off topic but I find people who say "trust me" to be rather suspicious if not laughable. It's a prick thing to say anyway.

---
Tennis is huge for an individual game. People like McEnroe should stop saying tennis needs to be fixed.
 

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This is from ESPN: http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/blog/index?entryID=3264207&name=tennis

U.S. missing the boatby: Peter Bodo, TENNIS.com
posted: Monday, February 25, 2008 | Feedback | Print Entry
filed under: Tennis

I just returned from a family vacation to the Central American nation of Costa Rica, a nation whose highest-ranking player on the ATP computer is Juan Antonio Marin (hi, Juan!), at No. 1135.


At noon one day, I walked into the bar of our hotel at Playa Carillo beach. The obligatory soccer game was on the television, and the obligatory three bar flies were enjoying their nooners, listlessly watching one of those weird international events in soccer -- The Champions Runner-Up Champions Cup or something …



I sat nearby with half an eye on the tube and I was surprised to see that over next forty minutes or so, the network (ESPN, natch) ran two full-blown, lengthy promotional spots: one for the NFL and the other for -- tennis. If you had just landed on planet earth, you'd be forgiven for thinking that they were sports of equal status and appeal.



And guess what? They just might be -- at least outside the States, where the long-awaited paradigm shift elevating tennis to a major sport has already occurred. Isn't it funny that here in the States, nothing -- not the populist histrionics of Jimmy Connors, the dramatic prowess of John McEnroe, the fiery socio-political agenda of Billie Jean King, not even the flat-out talent and accomplishments of Pete Sampras -- has managed to catapult tennis out of the niche-sport ghetto?



When you look at the growth and popularity of tennis outside the U.S., it's pretty easy to conclude that we've missed the boat -- kind of like those stock analysts who advised their clients to stay away from the Asian markets.



China? Pfffttt … Never happen.



Something similar is happening in tennis. While the game in the U.S. is struggling (in terms of producing talent, if not in staging tournaments and luring people like Maria Sharapova to come live and train here), the game everywhere else is flourishing. Just look at the tournaments played last week: The ATP had big events in San Jose, Calif., Buenos Aires and Rotterdam, with the top talent pretty evenly spread between them (Andy Roddick played San Jose, Rafael Nadal was in Rotterdam and David Nalbandian labored in BA). The WTA ladies had two tournaments, with the one in Santander, Colombia, overshadowed by the big event in Doha, Qatar.



So of the five main events last week, just one was played in the U.S. and the most meaningful and prestigious of the events took place in the Middle East (Qatar). This would hardly be worth a raised eyebrow were if not for the fact that in tennis, the U.S. was not only there first with a tournament and player infrastructure, it also all but single-handedly created the entire Open-era infrastructure for the game. It all seems to have slipped away.



It's hard for me to get too worked up about the failure of soccer to take hold here in the States because it never really was "our" game in any meaningful sense. But tennis was our game -- no less than football or basketball. In fact, right into the 1980s, it was almost exclusively our game. We not only had the top players, we also had the most important events and the expertise to export. But things changed, seemingly in the blink of an eye. Globally, tennis has won the credibility it has yet to attain here in the states.



Tennis is the great athletic success story of the late 20th Century, but we'll be the last to know.
:haha: :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha: :haha:
 

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i don't get why people keep referring to the middle east tournaments as new icons of tennis culture. heck, those countries are in no way a real competition because

1) they build these tournaments from scratch an amass tons of debt during the build-up that is never gonna be refinanced properly. but they don't need to care because sheikh al-halabad-bin-holadi-whatever just open his wallet and billions come out to "repair" the damage. this is how people over their understand capitalism. and frankly, no western country handles problems like this, thank god. it's simply ridiculous feudal decadence, not economics. if this is the future, the west hopefully just resign from this sort of crap. let them do their thing, i don't care, i don't wanna have anything do with it.

b) the audience numbbers are miserable. doha, dubai etc. is a joke when it comes to atmosphere, reception and overall attendance and it's not likely to change. as there's no middle class whatsoever but just multi-millionaires and 70% poor indian or pakistani workhorses, there is just no target group to sell tennis to in a proper way.

and if i was a tennis pro like roger, making 10 mil a year from playing alone, i'd be ashamed if i turned up in dubai every year to make some sheikh happy who whips his wives (!), let's people lapidate others or refuses to let israeli citizens into the country. it's a disgrace, big time.

and one day people will stand up, trust me.
Der Oyro Schnob rides again... :rolleyes:
 

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Reposting posts deleted by the mods is a step in the right direction :yeah:
I'm sure Zeke will be glad to have some company :awww:
 

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Insulting political and economical systems of other countries has everything to do with tennis, of course :) plus it goes very well with political correctness thing around here :) So, as far as THAT post is cleaned up, I have nothing against mine being deleted, and I'm sure the mods will see the point the right way :)
 
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