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A lot been said over the years with endless discussions about the 90s born sporting generation of mens tennis with no GS winners, no one has won more currently than 2 GS in womens tennis either.

But I've noticed this is becoming a problem across a lot of sports. 80s born currently:

Football - Lionel Messi (1987), Cristiano Ronaldo (1985) still top 2 players in the world, continuing to dominate world football in their 30s
Olympics sports - Usain Bolt (1986), Michael Phelps (1985)
Basketball - Lebron James (1984), Steph Curry (1988), Kevin Durant (1988)
Tennis - Roger Federer (1981), Serena Williams (1981), Rafa Nadal (1986), Novak Djokovic (1987)
Cycling - Alberto Contador (1982), Chris Froome (1985), Geraint Thomas (1986)
Cricket - James Anderon (1982), Dale Steyn (1983), Virat Kohli (1988), Steve Smith (1989)
Snooker - Mark Selby (1983), Judd Trump (1989)
F1 - Fernando Alonso (1981), Lewis Hamilton (1985), Sebastian Vettel (1987)
Darts - Michael van Gerwan (1989)
Boxing - Deontay Wilder (1985), Tyson Fury (1988), Anthony Joshua (1989)

60s borns gave us Wayne Gretzky, Michael Jordan, Michael Johnson, Carl Lewis, Steffi Graf, Diego Maradona, Michael Schumacher, Aryton Senna, Stephen Hendry, Jerry Rice, Miguel Indurain, Mario Lemieux, Shane Warne, Mike Tyson, Barry Bonds etc

70s borns gave us Tiger Woods, Tom Brady, Kobe Bryant, Sachin Tendulkar, Pete Sampras, Ronnie O'Sullivan, Phil Mickelson, Lennox lewis, Richie McCaw (Rugby GOAT), Zinedine Zidane, Ronaldinho, Tony McCoy (jump jockey GOAT) etc

So its not like the 80s born a freak generation, but people born in the 90s are aged 29-20 this year, but when I think of their sporting phenonmenons, I do struggle. Some decent golfers (Koepka, Spieth, early 90s), Mike Trout (1991) in Baseball, some decent cricketers (Joe Root - 1990), Katie Ledecky in swimming, Simone Biles in Gymnastics, but we are scratching the surface a bit here, where is the 90s equivalent to Tiger Woods, Usain Bolt, Michael Jordan etc? Absolute GOATs?

There is still to this date NEVER been a 90s born F1 Champion, NFL winning Quarterback, FIFA Ballon d'Or winner, World Snooker Champion, male tennis grand slam winner, tour de france winner. None at all. Evidently this isn't just a tennis problem.
 

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Good point (better than I expected), but it's still silly to say 80s are the last great gen "ever".

You can say that the new generations spend more time with computers and phones, but there will always (more-less) be the new greats regardless of that because money, glory and challenges in sport are too great to just be ignored by everybody. Talent, mentality and love for the sport are not the issue I think - some gens will be weaker, some will be stronger, 90s gen being weaker after a few great ones would be actually a normal thing, seems just like a normal oscillation to me. Maybe 2020s gen will be loaded with the new GOATs and BOATs, and Fed's all time ranking will just keep going down, unless Fed instructs his puppets in ATP and ITF to make seasons harder and longer.
 

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Messi and CR7 are similar to our Big 3, unbelievable talents, aided by god knows what.

Football is of course different than tennis in terms of number of elite players(you have about 11 times more :D) but still, there are tons of large talents. Hazard, Neymar, Mbappe, have to be above 90s born tennis players so far.
 

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Maybe it is a bit early to judge this. Obviously I agree that there were many great sportsmen and -women born in the 80s. But just go through your list and think about what they had already won 10 years ago:
Messi and Ronaldo combined 1 Ballon d'Or
Usain Bolt: 2 olympic gold medals. I'll give you Phelps, he already had 14 gold medals
James, Curry, Durant: not a single NBA title combined
Tennis, we know, the 80's were exceptional. Still Djokovic had only 1 GS title in 2009
Contador, Froome, Thomas: 1 Tour de France win combined
Mark Selby, Judd Trump: no big title
Alonso: 2 titles, Hamilton 1
I have no idea about darts, cricket or boxing, so I'll leave that to others.

My conclusion: we just don't yet know who will be the big stars born in the 90s. With some exceptions of course, such as Mikhaela Shiffrin, Simone Biles or Katie Ledecky,
 

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I know it's cliche, but there were a lot less distractions 10-20-30 years ago. I look at myself, jsut how hard it is to keep focused on something. You have access to unlimited information, and there will always be something you want to check, or someone you can chat with at any moment during the day without paying anything. World was a lot more boring in the early 2000s, when the 80s generation was stepping into the spotlight. They were educated in a different way.
 

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Maybe it is a bit early to judge this. [...]
Yes, we'll need to wait at least 10 years before we can make a proper judgment.

As you say, even now there are exceptions, an excellent example being the French athlete Kevin Mayer (born 10 February 1992), who broke the decathlon world record last September:

Ashton Eaton has led the praise after seeing his decathlon world record sensationally eclipsed by France’s Kevin Mayer who beat Eaton’s mark of 9045 by 81 points with his brilliant 9126 performance in Talence last weekend.

Eaton, 30, the two-time Olympic champion who retired last year, tweeted: "That was an incredible display of ability! I'm super happy for @mayer_decathlon & even more for the future of the decathlon.

"Important thing to me has always been to keep pushing the limit and inspiring others to do the same. The more 9k can become commonplace the better."
https://www.european-athletics.org/news/article=eaton-leads-the-praise-mayer-takes-the-world-decathlon-record-9126-points/index.html
 

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Meh... All-NBA first team has 3/5 players born in the 90s (George, Antetokounmpo, Jokic), NBA Finals MVP was just won by a player born in 1991 (Leonard) and regular season MVP will likely be won by Antetokounmpo. The winner of Ski Jumping World Cup and all of the Four Hills (extremely rare feat) was born in 1996 (Kobayashi). Best chess player in the world and possibly one of the best of all times (Carlsen) also born in 1990. There are probably plenty of other examples, this is just off the top of my head.
 

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I actually opened a thread on this exact topic last year :p I’m not as familiar with all eras of all kinds of sports as you, your summary seems a lot more complete :yeah: I believe that at least the 90s won’t be remembered as a great sporting generation, but as the amount of prestigious titles in all sports remain a constant, it’s hard to say whether the generation after that will produce some dominating athletes.

https://www.menstennisforums.com/2-general-messages/946138-lack-greatness-among-90s-born-athletes.html
 

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It's not all about distractions. It's about hard working and determination too. Look at 80s sporting generation. They have fire in their eyes! 90s gen lacking that fire. They must find it.
 

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It is a general problem of society I think. Look at all the young people today. No one wants to work hard, everybody is just lazy and cares about himself.
Also the kids today grow up with all the computer and smartphone stuff, many of them just aren't interested in sports anymore and can't take anything seriously.
I think today the average young person needs a lot more time to become an adult, than maybe in the 90s. So eventually any sports will be dominated by guys who focus on the important things, which is mostly hard work. And this will be the older guys, who are finally mature.

Look how many talents there are in football (soccer football for you american guys) being compared to Messi or something, that they have the same talent. Yet no one of them even comes close, they all crack under the pressure of expectations.

The world we live in is so bad for sports. All the social media, all the pressure the young guys have today. Only very few of them can keep a cool head and not get distracted.
So I don't think that the younger generation is so much less talented than the old guys, I just think that they can't exploit their full potential because of all the distractions. I can imagine, that a Federer just doesn't care that much about Facebook, Instagram and so on. He is one of the old-fashioned sportsmen, fully focused on tennis. The young generation can't focus on important things anymore, they didn't learn it.
 

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Unfortunately the rules are being bent to help lazy athletes, and that encourages them to be even lazier.
The quality of each sport is suffering because of this.
The sports without many rule changes - 100 meter sprint for example - don't suffer.
 

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E-Sports and E-Entertainment are taking over... sad but true. No one wants to be like messi or federer anymore. Many want to be like ninja. Seems far more convenient with little to no physical commitment.

Playing a stupid video game and trashtalking all day is simply more appealing than tough physical training...
 

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E-Sports and E-Entertainment are taking over... sad but true. No one wants to be like messi or federer anymore. Many want to be like ninja. Seems far more convenient with little to no physical commitment.

Playing a stupid video game and trashtalking all day is simply more appealing than tough physical training...
There were plenty of video games around when Federer was a kid, he's not that old. :lol:
 

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There were plenty of video games around when Federer was a kid, he's not that old. :lol:
There was no twitch. There was no YouTube. There were no FIFA and WOW worlds with millions of prize money. There were no people paying others to watch them play a game. No one was making a living from playing video games back then.

Man could you have missed the point even more?
 

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there were definitely a lot of all time greats born in the 80's

but there are some very good athletes active now born in the 90's and later too

francesco friedrich (1990)
mikaela shiffrin (1995)
eve muirhead (1990)
naomi osaka(1997)
mikael kingsbury(1992)
nathan chen(1999)
kim yu na((1990)
tom daley(1994)
oskar eriksson(1991)

so the 80's certainly had a lot of great athletes and many all time greats but there's a lot of strong athletes born in the 90's as well and some have arguably cemented a spot as an all time great in their sport already

so i would argue no.
 

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It seems like OP was selective in his examples especially with regards to basketball and women's tennis.

And honestly the "90s generation is lazy" argument is becoming stale because the research out there points to that not being true at least with regards to labor.

As for the social media theory, that's just bogus. On instagram alone, Messi and Ronaldo, Buffon and Alves all post more than Pogba but when Pogba has a bad game, analysts say it's because of social media.

I find it hard to believe that social media has any impact on an athlete's performance. As for video games, older players had video games. Pirlo was a FIFA addict, even played it the day of the world cup final.
 

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Interesting.

I can't speak for other sports, but there seems to be something going on ... but if you were born in the late 90s you're just 20 or so now, so not really fair to say yet there are no greats from that decade.

Some on this thread cite all the cybernetic distraction as a factor. And the loss of focus that comes with that. I'm not so inclined to think that's the reason, though i will blame alot of other shit on that.

I wonder if the 90s generation is just a bit less willing to make the sacrifices and suffer (physically) for greatness ...
Whether they have the same drive, given you can still make a lot of money without becoming the very best.
Kyrgios is a prime example. But there are other young players who are very serious and focused and work hard ...
 
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