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Discussion Starter #1
We often link clutch players as the ones who have a good serve as they can hit aces or unreturnables on dangerous situations (2014 Fed, 2014 Lopez, Isner...)
But then we have Kevin...
Any extremely clutch player with a poor serve?

Also the players that take more risks are more prone to chockery, since they play for lower margins and mental instability doesn't help the risk takers (once again Kevin, JJ,Mugro...).

And finally Nadal for example, known for his mental strenght, you can agree or disagree with that, but being an high percentage player or a ball machine helps you keeping cool and strong mentally?
You know, if you have a good arsenal of shots (dropshot, good volleys, etc.) you have more decisions to make, therefore you are exposted to take the wrong ones on pressure.
Players that keep it simple look more strong mentally. Look at Simon, winning all those 5 setters and saving those Match Points...

(Sorry this is not a Djokovic-related post. I'm not even sure if it's mandatory these days on this forum)
 

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Not really. I have Nadal, Isner, Djokovic and del Potro as the four most clutch players on tour, and they all have different styles. It helps to have some huge weapons to fall back on, be it a huge serve, FH, insane defensive ability...
 

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Choking specifically surely isn't linked to any particular style. Even if it were, the problem is you can't execute what you normally would.
 

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I have to say I have yet to currently see an aggressive player maybe other than Federer and Berdych (against lower ranked players) who could actually be consistent (although Raonic is kinda aggressive but it is more concentrated due to serve) compared to the more consistent ones -- similar story to the lower tiers, too.
 

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Choking specifically surely isn't linked to any particular style. Even if it were, the problem is you can't execute what you normally would.
Have to disagree, someone who actually goes for his shots is more prone to choking than someone who just retrieve the ball back.
 

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I think the only link may be that defensive players may seem to be more clutch because in tense situations they can play safely and wait for the other player's nerves to cause an error.

With the whole big server seeming clutch, it just appears that way because of the scenario. They likely would've hit that ace if the score was 1-1 compared to 5-6, but of course when you see them ace it on a big point you think they are more clutch.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
As a recreational tennis player who has tried many styles, I feel like going for flatter shots and being more agressive, it's harder when your hand is shaking, but playing like Nadal does, using a lot of top spin to keep your ball away from the net but inside the lines, even if I'm nervous I can still keep the ball in play.

Also, I have concentration issues, but when I have BP down I tend to concentrate more on the serve and hit better ones, so having a good serve can help you on the clutchness :p

Of course, all conclusions on this are from my recreational yet competitive matches, so It's worth what it's worth :lol:
 

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Players who hit the ball flat and take more risk are always in bigger danger of missing a few shots in a row. Now if that happens during an important stage in a match it will look like a choke, but that isn't always the case.

Also Bellucci is one of the biggest chokers and he hits with a lot of top spin for example.


So I would say there is very little correlation between playing style and ability to choke.
 

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As a recreational tennis player who has tried many styles, I feel like going for flatter shots and being more agressive, it's harder when your hand is shaking, but playing like Nadal does, using a lot of top spin to keep your ball away from the net but inside the lines, even if I'm nervous I can still keep the ball in play.

Also, I have concentration issues, but when I have BP down I tend to concentrate more on the serve and hit better ones, so having a good serve can help you on the clutchness :p

Of course, all conclusions on this are from my recreational yet competitive matches, so It's worth what it's worth :lol:
it does make sense.

similar experience here as well.

But it's also a lot about confidence. One is more prone to choke in an underdog position, than fave position.

A matter of self belief and chance sometimes.

The choke is when one makes the wrong decision during the rally imo. Or decide about the type of serve under pressure, when to pull the trigger, whether pull it or not.

Underdogs would more often go for either too safe, or too risky (stupid drop shots, pulling the trigger too early, go for the lowest percentage first serve they have to create a surprise, etc.).

If one has the confidence he's got the upper hand or is in fair position in the rallies, he'd more often manage through BPs for or against imo.

Like the guy who saved just recently 8 MPs and won the match (can't remember which match it was, just yesterday or smth). He saved 6 MPs, twice down 0-40 on and against serve.

People kinda went with the impression he made them all and there was no choke from the opponent, but they failed to see the stupid set ups, the useless shortening of the rally by going to the net, or playing the counter drop too safe, or missing serves, etc.

So it's very much about confidence i'd say. Something that PHM will never have, Roger will never have against Rafa and Rafa will always have against the former.

It's in the head. And i don't think different sets of weaponry would add or diminish the percentage of chokes.

Rafa doesn't choke as much coz he's 95% of the time the better player on court. He has more self belief and confidence. Not because of his style imo.

Wawrinka lost to Djokovic at AO one year coz he didn't have the confidence he could go all the way. Next year he knew he can play toe to toe with him and had this faith and belief in him from the previous year, so he pulled it away.

Ferrer on the other hand is a very safe style player, but he'd always give away important wins against the top guys, coz he doesn't believe he can beat them. He actually knows deep inside that he can't.

It's in the head obviously, but it's not about the weapons, rather about the decisions.

That's why favorites win TBs much more often than they lose.
 

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More topspin = bigger cuts at the ball which probably lends itself more to being a bit tense and nervous. The great flat ball strikers tend to have their arms and wrists relaxed. Although the byproduct of being nervous and hitting with a lot of topspin is dumping the ball into the net. I.e. basically Nadal in tight situations over the past 9 months.
 

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More topspin = bigger cuts at the ball which probably lends itself more to being a bit tense and nervous. The great flat ball strikers tend to have their arms and wrists relaxed. Although the byproduct of being nervous and hitting with a lot of topspin is dumping the ball into the net. I.e. basically Nadal in tight situations over the past 9 months.
Yes because top spin requires a certain amount of racket speed, players who are hitting with a lot of spin are also suffering a lot if they tighten up because of that.
 
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