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http://www.itftennis.com/shared/medialibrary/pdf/original/IO_16756_original.PDF
Tennis Anti-Doping Programme

The International Tennis Federation (ITF) announced today that an independent Tribunal (Tim Kerr QC, sitting alone) has ruled that Alex Bogomolov Jr has been found to have committed a Doping Offence under the ITF’s Tennis Anti-Doping Programme 2005.

A sample collected from Alex Bogomolov Jr at the Australian Open on 13 January 2005 tested positive for salbutamol. The player said he took salbutamol for medical reasons (to treat his exercise induced asthma), but as of the date of the sample collection he did not have a valid Therapeutic Use Exemption (TUE) to cover the treatment. The Tribunal found that there had been no intent to enhance performance by the taking of salbutamol (which is a “Specified Substance” under the World Anti-Doping Code), so that the otherwise mandatory two-year ban under the Programme did not apply. However, the player was found to be at fault for failing to take personal responsibility for ensuring that he had a valid TUE to cover the use of the salbutamol.

As a result, the Tribunal determined that Alex Bogomolov Jr is sanctioned with a one-and-a-half month suspension starting from 26 September 2005, and will forfeit the prize money and ranking points earned at the Australian Open and at subsequent events up to and including the Mexico City Challenger which took place from 4-10 April 2005. Alex Bogomolov Jr will be eligible to return to competition on 10 November 2005. The full decision of the Tribunal is published on the ITF website www.itftennis.com.
 

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Salbutamol is regular anti-asthma medicine. I use it myself too. It's not performance-enhancing.
Bogomolov should have gotten an exemption, his failure to do is a stupidity but would by no means have justified a larger punishment. One-and-a-half month is more than enough as it is. Clearly, no harm was intended.
 

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Purple Rainbow said:
Salbutamol is regular anti-asthma medicine. I use it myself too. It's not performance-enhancing.
Bogomolov should have gotten an exemption, his failure to do is a stupidity but would by no means have justified a larger punishment. One-and-a-half month is more than enough as it is. Clearly, no harm was intended.
Ah ok, thanks for clarifying. I sort of jumped to the conclusion it was performance enhancing. My bad :eek:
 

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Lee said:
If the drug is not performance enhancing, why is it banned?
I don't know. Why is marijuana on the list? Clearly not performance enhancing, yet Dutch ace Melle van Gemerden (who is on quite a good run lately!) has been banned for marijuana use.
 

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Purple Rainbow said:
Salbutamol is regular anti-asthma medicine. I use it myself too. It's not performance-enhancing.
Bogomolov should have gotten an exemption, his failure to do is a stupidity but would by no means have justified a larger punishment. One-and-a-half month is more than enough as it is. Clearly, no harm was intended.
I am a fairly heavy user of the stuff to treat my asthma...as are many people. This seems very unfair but yet, at the same time, it is kind of performance enhancing when you think that without salbutamol, it is impossible to move as quickly because the lungs take in much less air. But really this is stupid....but there again he should have filled in the necessary paperwork. :silly:
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Purple Rainbow said:
Salbutamol is regular anti-asthma medicine. I use it myself too. It's not performance-enhancing. Bogomolov should have gotten an exemption, his failure to do is a stupidity but would by no means have justified a larger punishment. One-and-a-half month is more than enough as it is. Clearly, no harm was intended.
I just read through the report & it's pretty straightforward. At one time he had a TUE for this medication, but it had expired and he failed to renew it and continued to use the medication. The ITF concluded that there was no intent to enhance performance, but that the player was at fault for knowing about the rules, but being careless in following them.
Lee said:
If the drug is not performance enhancing, why is it banned?
Some drugs that are approved for theraputic use can be used to enhance performance by athletes not suffering from the condition they are used to treat. For example, insulin is approved for theraputic use by diabetics, but non-diabetics could use insulin to enhance performance (more so in the case of sprint type events--track or swimming--than tennis). Therefore, diabetics must file a TUE form so that red flags won't go off when the insulin shows up in their tests. The same is true for the asthma medication in this case.
 

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smucav said:
I just read through the report & it's pretty straightforward. At one time he had a TUE for this medication, but it had expired and he failed to renew it and continued to use the medication. The ITF concluded that there was no intent to enhance performance, but that the player was at fault for knowing about the rules, but being careless in following them.
Can't they just give him a warning then? It sounds stupid...
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
jazz_girl said:
Can't they just give him a warning then? It sounds stupid...
Attending the doping meeting (January 2004) & signing for the subsequent doping materials are the equivalent of a warning. Any doping cases since then do not allow ignorance of the rules as a defense.

It's similar to the Koubek case in that both players testified that they attended the doping meeting (January 2004) & received additional doping materials (including the wallet card) since then, but admitted that they didn't really pay attention. In this case he was also told in person by the doctor who signed the last TUE form that was only good for a certain period of time and was also questioned by the doctor at the Australian Open about whether or not he had a TUE form before he gave him the medication.
 

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smucav said:
Attending the doping meeting (January 2004) & signing for the subsequent doping materials are the equivalent of a warning. Any doping cases since then do not allow ignorance of the rules as a defense.

It's similar to the Koubek case in that both players testified that they attended the doping meeting (January 2004) & received additional doping materials (including the wallet card) since then, but admitted that they didn't really pay attention. In this case he was also told in person by the doctor who signed the last TUE form that was only good for a certain period of time and was also questioned by the doctor at the Australian Open about whether or not he had a TUE form before he gave him the medication.
Ok then, that's different. He was warned before and he had full knowledge of the subject, the stupid one was him then...
Thanks for the explanation.
 

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Article from a year ago on player's fears about accidental doping:

_________________________________
2004
Copyright © Las Vegas Review-Journal

Agassi: Players concerned about accidental doping


Las Vegan quits using supplements


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS



KEY BISCAYNE, Fla. -- Andre Agassi has stopped taking nutritional supplements until the ATP Tour decides how to reduce the risk of inadvertently using banned substances.

The Las Vegan is a member of a task force formed last month to study the problem in men's tennis. The group met for the first time Tuesday before the Nasdaq-100 Open.

"I'm encouraged," Agassi said Thursday. "The meeting shed a lot of light on the exact animal we're dealing with and some potential solutions."

The debate regarding supplements intensified earlier this month when former U.S. Open runner-up Greg Rusedski successfully argued his positive test for nandrolone could have come from electrolytes distributed by the ATP itself.

Rusedski is the eighth male tennis player in as many months to escape suspension after positive nandrolone tests. Players are wary of contaminated or inaccurately labeled supplements that might result in a positive test, Agassi said.

"That's the scary part: That during this interim, until we figure out what we're going to do, you can't take anything unless you're willing to risk it," Agassi said.

He said one solution discussed by the task force involved testing supplements to help ensure that they're not contaminated or mislabeled.

Agassi said he's confident his sport is clean. He said he submitted to drug testing nearly 20 times last year, and such top players as Roger Federer and Andy Roddick were tested even more than that.

"For our sport to sort of be defaced on the covers of magazines or newspapers is really frustrating," Agassi said.

Other players on the task force include Tim Henman, James Blake and Albert Costa. Also attending the group's first meeting were former players, coaches and drug experts.

"Our meeting was an initial step in the right direction and provided the background we need to tackle this issue," ATP president Chris Clouser said.

Two more meetings are scheduled over the next five months, and the group will issue a report this summer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
jazz_girl said:
Ok then, that's different. He was warned before and he had full knowledge of the subject, the stupid one was him then...
Thanks for the explanation.
Also, even after being questioned about the form by the doctor at the Australian Open, he continued using the medication (without checking on the validity of the form) until he received the results of the positive test in April. That's why they stripped him of the points/money for that whole time period rather than just the tournament where the infraction occurred.
 

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More from 2004 on tennis and the possibilities of accidental doping:
__________________________________
Sports News

Tennis: Agassi defends tough stance on doping

MELBOURNE, Australia: Andre Agassi says the life of a professional tennis player today means not even using skin lotion for fear it could lead to charges of doping. And he wouldn't have it any other way.

Speaking after breezing into the third round of the Australian Open on Wednesday, Agassi weighed into a raging debate over whether the tough anti-doping regime in professional tennis is fair to players.

The controversy flared after British player Greg Rusedski revealed he faces a special ATP tribunal in Montreal next month after testing positive for the banned steroid nandrolone.

Rusedski said trace elements of the steroid were in an electrolyte drink given to him by ATP trainers and his dilemma has fueled fears among players that vitamins and other supplements taken routinely by top athletes could leave them open to charges of doping.

Asked about the debate, Agassi said he was confronted by the problem just before the Australian Open this week when needed to treat a rash on the back of his right hand.

"In order for me to put on a basic skin irritant cream, I had to fill out three pages of forms and get them faxed and sent and confirmed that it was okay for me to put cream on my hand," he said.

"That's the reality of the tennis player's life," he said.
"It's so intense ... the reality of how we have to live, of taking basic aspirins, by no means any sort of cold medication -- none of it's allowed, none of it's tolerated. We've seen example after example."

Spanish star Albert Costa, who is on the 10-member ATP tour council, said growing numbers of players were afraid to take anything other than plain mineral water to help them cope with the high temperatures and extreme conditions of modern-day tennis competitions.

"The players are all scared," he said. "Everybody's talking in the locker room: 'Be careful with this, be careful with that'."

"Right now you cannot even drink electrolytes, you cannot do anything," he said. "I only take the drink I've been having for the past six years and I've stopped taking vitamin C, magnesium and other vitamin supplements."

Costa and other players have suggested the ATP, rather than simply listing banned substances, set up a sort of "supermarket" list of approved products that players can use without fear.

This would notably help players avoid the trap of cross-contamination when normally harmless substances are tainted with trace elements of banned drugs in giant laboratories where multiple products are made.

Agassi backed the notion in theory.

"Ideally, you'd like to see players get supplied officially with the things that are sort of deemed okay," he said.

But the 34-year-old veteran, one of the most respected players on the tour, quickly added that he would rather cope with the rigors of the current anti-doping policy then leave his sport open to potential drug cheats.

"I think it's a serious enough issue to make sure that you're not erring on the side of compromising the integrity of our sport," he said.

"Either I don't have to worry about the cream on my hand and we have potential for drug cheats, or I do have to worry about the cream on my hand, but then I certainly would want to live with the respect that this is how we go about our profession now," he said.

"It's not an easy situation, but one that I believe the media has a responsibility to lay out accurately,

AFP text, photos, graphics and logos shall not be reproduced, published, broadcast, rewritten for broadcast or publication or redistributed directly or indirectly in any medium. AFP shall not be held liable for any delays, inaccuracies, errors or omissions in any AFP content, or for any actions taken in consequence.

Copyright © 2005 Agence France Presse. All rights reserved.
 

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smucav said:
Also, even after being questioned about the form by the doctor at the Australian Open, he continued using the medication (without checking on the validity of the form) until he received the results of the positive test in April. That's why they stripped him of the points/money for that whole time period rather than just the tournament where the infraction occurred.
That was quite irresponsable...
 

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A shame that he didn't follow the proper procedures, since it sounds like this could have been avoided. Regardless, at least he's only getting a slap on the wrist for it. I didn't realize that he had asthma.

Hopefully our resident Alex lover isn't too upset about the news.
 
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