Fabrice News and Articles - Page 2 - MensTennisForums.com

MensTennisForums.com

MenstennisForums.com is the premier Men's Tennis forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.Please Register - It's Free!

Reply

Old 03-11-2006, 05:19 AM   #16
16681
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Fabrice News and Articles

Oh Choupi that was wonderful work you did to get the article in English for us And what a great article it was about Fab Thanks so very much
View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 

Old 03-11-2006, 08:15 AM   #17
country flag Choupi
Registered User
 
Choupi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Age: 41
Posts: 20,073
Choupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Fabrice News and Articles

Thanks Mae. Now, I need to do the interview. The best part, imo.
__________________
Best of LUCK to ALL my Faves in 2014
Choupi is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2006, 08:50 AM   #18
country flag Action Jackson
Forum Umpire:
Gaston Gaudio
 
Action Jackson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 124,477
Action Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Fabrice News and Articles

Look forward to rest of the articles and well Geneva has a lot of Frenchies living there. Good to know about how he trains and can't wait for the rest of the articles.
__________________
On Nadal bumping him on the changeover, Rosol said: "It's ok, he wanted to take my concentration; I knew he would try something".


Wilander on Dimitrov - "He has mind set on imitating Federer and yes it looks good. But he has no idea what to do on the court".

Quote:
Originally Posted by Filo V. View Post
I definitely would have preferred Gaba winning as he needs the points much more, but Jan would have beaten him anyway. I expect Hajek to destroy Machado, like 6-1 6-2.
Machado wins 6-2 6-1
Action Jackson is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2006, 10:01 PM   #19
16681
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Fabrice News and Articles

Yes I was surprised that he lives in Geneva. And I think I'm going to have to do a little research on him myself. Because when I saw the name Santoro listed I thought he was a Spanish player
View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 03-16-2006, 04:26 PM   #20
country flag Choupi
Registered User
 
Choupi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Age: 41
Posts: 20,073
Choupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Fabrice News and Articles

I hope you found some infos about him Mae.

I just wanted to let you know that I had started working on that long interview. I haven't forgotten and a promise is a promise. Just some more patience.
__________________
Best of LUCK to ALL my Faves in 2014
Choupi is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 03-17-2006, 02:50 AM   #21
16681
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Fabrice News and Articles

Quote:
Originally Posted by Choupi
I hope you found some infos about him Mae.

I just wanted to let you know that I had started working on that long interview. I haven't forgotten and a promise is a promise. Just some more patience.
Don't worry about the time Choupi. You are wonderful to do the translation for us And thank you for reminding me that I had forgotten to try to find some information on
Santoro. That name for some reason just doesn't sound or look French to me
View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2006, 03:21 PM   #22
country flag Choupi
Registered User
 
Choupi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Age: 41
Posts: 20,073
Choupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Fabrice News and Articles

I knew it took some time but I think I'm gonna be forgiven when you see how long that interview is. Here is only the 1st half of it. The rest is coming up.

From Tennis Magazine, April 2006, by Guy Barbier.

Tennis Magazine: Let's first talk about your famous QF at the AO. What do you think about all this now?
Fabrice Santoro: At the moment? It's just been extraordinary. I had been fighting for all this for so long. I knew time was playing against me. Until you're 25, you tell yourself, this is gonna happen. And at 28: still not there! At 30, things get seriously complicated. So, at more than 33, it's just fabulous. I've received many congratulation messages. I've decided to reply to all of them, at my own rhythm of course, but to all. If people take care of sending you a message, you just have to do it...

TM: How did you celebrate it?
FS: In Australia, we stayed 2 more days in Melbourne, to celebrate this our way: under the sun, on the beach, all the family together, a few good restaurants. And then, we flied back home.

TM: How was the arrival in Geneva?
FS: It's been quiet, usual routine, school for Djenae, up at 6.45am. And physical training to stay fit.

TM: Despite all the experience, which is yours, to have reached such a goal can still reinforce your confidence, teach you something. What do you think?
FS: Whatever you do in life, its most of all important to do it, to know that you can do it. And from this moment on, why not do it again? Though I know that doing it twice will be very tough. On clay especially. RG is undoubtedly the tournament where my chances of getting far are the poorest. That surface is very demanding and the older you get, the further my game goes away from clay's characteristics.

TM: To come closer to grass rules, still settled on the Wimbledon goal?
FS: Yes, the point is to lighten my programm on clay in order to come on grass with my full means. The details aren't settled yet, but it is more than likely that I do that way.

TM: Pretty everywhere in Australia, and of course in France, as well as everywhere else, your Australian performance has brought you many praises. Doesn't that tribute come too late to your taste?
FS: Things happen when they are meant to. And if that happens to me now, it's because I've thought alot about my game. At 22 or 24, with the game I was playing, I just couldn't hope getting such compliments. I used to have a defensive game which wasn't really fascinating nor funny to watch. Now, people can feel I'm having a blast on a court, that I'm enjoying it. And my style of game is so far away from what is played today that they appreciate it all the more. They come to see something different. That they like or not doesn't matter. They come to see something different.

TM: But isn't there a small trap to avoid falling into, to be tempted to make too much "for the crowd"?
FS: Yes, it's true. It can be dangerous. That matches turn out like exhibitions. And that I start missing easy shots, playing wrong. To play, just for the sake of it. You should always keep in mind that the goal is to win.

TM: Let's come back on your goal of the QF, those who remember about your precocity can be surprised that you didn't look further. What were your goals, your dreams as a young player?
FS: But I just had no goal! Tennis was a game. I've won bunches of titles as a junior, and at 16, I remember I asked myself something in RG. My parents were present, with my coach: do I want to become a pro? The point was to give the best I could, not to become n°1 or to win RG. So, people may have imagined I would go higher, I would win a GS, but it wasn't realistic. Me, I was already pretty happy to have become a pro. And my dad had told me: you've made your choice, so now, go full blast and no regrets, you'll see how it goes. Actually, I simply didn't have the means to be N°1, that's all!

TM: But there had to be an unknown part for you. From which moment did you get aware of your true possibilities and of your limits?
FS: When I reached 20. I was ranked about 20. It was already great. I didn't feel I could go higher. Mostly because of the tennis I was playing at that time. And physically, I simply couldn't go till the end in a GS. So, that said, when I look back at it all, if, between 18 and 25, I could have been able to play the tennis I play today, so maybe, during the 2nd part of my career, I could have hoped for something better. But at that time, I was locked up in a style of game that had me lose my time.

TM: Too defensive, is that it?
FS: Yes, totally defensive. In fact, in the opposite of what I used to practise among juniors.When I started as a pro, I started to play, not to win, but not to lose. But I had so much pressure on my shoulders. People were expecting so much from me, especially in French events, that if I happened to do 1 fault, I had the impression I was guilty of something serious! Hence, I was doing very few errors, but also very few points! I was unable to take the initiative because I was afraid of the outside judgement. I had thus locked myself in that game: no fault, no point!

TM: Did you talk about this with a psy?
FS: My only psy was my dad. When I went to see him in November 1996, I was a bit desperate. My ranking was getting low and most of all, my pleasure was drowning. I asked him for advice. About how he was seeing my game and what I had to do to find back my efficiency, to have fun again on a court. He told me: you were a creator when you were a kid, in all that you were doing. There's no reason to not do it today. We've watched videos, talked about the style of game that 2-handed players have to play...He adviced me to play forth, to play doubles and then, I started my 2nd career.

TM: You thus consider your career with 2 distinct phases?
FS: Yes, before and after 1996. I started to regularly play doubles since January 1997. That's pretty simple: today, I have 23 titles, doubles and singles altogether. 22 of them are from the 2nd part! I'd say that, between 1988 and 1995, I've undergone basic training. In 1996, I've analyzed. And from 1997, I've entered my real career.

TM: Yet, when you reached your 1st 8th of final, in RG, at only 18, you must have told yourself it was only the beginning of a great adventure. What followed could only be harder?
FS: Yes, it's been hard. In 1991, for a few months, I've told myself "wow, the 8th at 18, without losing a set, beating Mats Wilander for the 2nd rd..." I then thought I was on the right way. But in fact, I had no future with my style of game. If you watch those matches I've played in RG, you can see I hardly made any errors. That others, Wilander included, were missing before me. I didn't go for the victory. In the 1st part of my career, I actually never lost a match because I was making many errors. I was doing nothing. And when I got aware of those limits, in 1996, my level of pleasure was the lowest. My 1st thought has been to tell myself: I am gonna pack my rackets and do something else. And that's my father, who, fast, got me out of there.

TM: 1996 has also been the year of your wrist injury...
FS: I've always thought that this injury wasn't hazardous. Because 1996 is the year when I stop training, when I miss RG, when I play almost all of my matches with my mind wandering somewhere else and, in Prague, when I hit that linesman, do I really think about hitting my backhand or about little birds? It was also the year I was building up my private life- I had met Chris Laure in 1995. I was distracted. No more pleasure on the court, no more ambition. I was in the middle of some crisis, partly due to my awareness of my game and its limits. Actually, that injury has only been good for me, it gave me some time to think.

TM: Which has been the 1st tournament of your "re-birth"?
FS: Marseille 1997. I had been working with my father for only 2 months. I had a WC, I was ranked 150. And when I reached the semis, I saw that in playing a more offensive game, tennis was just fabulous. And on top of that, I can defeat the best! I've been lucky to be quickly rewarded, after I changed my game in 1996, as soon as February 1997.

TM: Tennis is known to be a sport that leads to individualism. And you, you're said to be individualistic to the extreme. Is that right?
FS: I'm neither more individualistic, nor selfish- both notions join for me- than other tennis players. I indeed think that all players are individualistic and I think it's vital to be. A tennis player is someone who makes his own planning, who has to find his own game, his own training rhythm, he has to organize his life, learn how to know his body and who is bound to think big time by himself. All this leads to individualism. And the player quickly feels like seeing things change around him. The more I step forward in time, the more convictions I have in my methods, in what is good or bad for me. I think I'm open to everything in some preparation times. But, as soon as competition time is on again, I hold on to my certainties, and I've worked to have them.

TM: Your style of game can also require a specific preparation...
FS: Not so much my style. More the vision of what it has to be. Each day, when I enter a court, I have to have fun, to laugh. I will, all of a sudden, feel like doing a shot totally crazy, and I also want a fun touch in each of my trainings.

TM: Would you say that you prepare like the other players?
FS: Hmmmm....On the court, I don't see that much difference. Or maybe I will work on dropshot which isn't used by others, or the sliced forehand which nobody is interested in anymore!

TM: Do you feel any regrets now, as to how you've led your career?
FS: I would have liked knowing all I know today when I was 18! (smiles). I'm overjoyed with my career. All this has been built up, step by step, and if I'm almost at my best level so late, it is because I've asked myself ten thousand questions. Holidays are part of the success. It took me some time to realize this. When I was 18 and that I was having holidays, I had that impression I was ruining my career, I was moving more slowly than others.

TM: And when have you started going on holidays?
FS: In the 2nd part of my career, from 1997 on.

TM: At the end of the day, isn't it Chris Laure who freed you from that obsessional vision of tennis?
FS: Yes, it certainly is. Before being with Chris, I was living alone in my flat. When they were coming home, my friends used to tell me : look at your life, it's really no fun! In bed at 8.30pm, soya in my salad, and instead of olive oil, lemon juice. Sauceless pasta, no cheese. Never any dessert. I wasn't going out. I had a very strict way of life. And I thought I had to if I wanted to succeed. If I had gone on that way, I certainly would have stopped playing. Today, I've realized that a tennis player can do everything, like anyone else. Except that he has to pick his moments. I can drink wine, I can sleep late, eat a sauerkraut. But when I'm in the middle of a tournament, I sleep early and I eat no sauerkraut! Another thing I'm sure about concerning my way of life and my preparation, it is that I don't need to do running anymore. I've run thousands of times during the 1st part of my career, between 12 and 25. And I'm convinced that if I'm so strong today, it is because of those thousands of miles. Now, for me, cycling has replaced running. Because I think that, given the 100 matches I play every year, it would be ridiculous to add traumas either to my knees, ankles, lumbar vertebra, etc....I have enough of those when I play on hard! So, all the built up for me now, it's on the bike.

TM: You've played 19 players who became world N°1. You beat them all, except Roddick (2-0), Lendl (1-0) but most of all, Yevgeni Kafelnikov, who got you 6/0! What did he have that embarrassed you so much, Kafelnikov?
FS: First, I've always played him when he was at his best level. And also because I had nothing problematic to offer. In the backhand's line, he was better than me, in the forehand's, he was even better. My serve didn't absolutely bother him, and I had trouble returning his. I had no way out. Unless a bad match on his part. And against me, that simply never happened! I don't have the same feeling of being powerless when I play Roddick, against whom I've recently lost 6/4 7/6 in Lyon...


To Be Continued.....
__________________
Best of LUCK to ALL my Faves in 2014
Choupi is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2006, 06:50 AM   #23
country flag Choupi
Registered User
 
Choupi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Age: 41
Posts: 20,073
Choupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Fabrice News and Articles

As promised, 2nd half of the interview.

TM: Let's pass on to Marat Safin. You're his pet peeve (7 victories for 2 losses), but you also defeated twice the undeniable current N°1 Roger Federer, or lost after extraordinary matches. What does he inspire you today?
FS: There are a lot of players I have a lot of respect for. Guys like Sampras, Agassi, Becker, Connors...encounters that strike you. But Federer, yes. I'd like him to win 15 GSs. He's brought tennis to a level nobody had ever reached before him. It would only be justice that he reaches the greatest palmares. Take just all the best of before at their best- Federer is above. He's the best of the best.

TM: Talking about all those great players, who would be your ideal player, if you had to take all great shots of every one of them?
FS: Sampras's serve, Federer's forehand, Agassi's backhand, Rafter's volley, Federer's fitness and Federer's mental.

TM: You're updating files on almost every player on your pc. How do you proceed and how long have you been doing so?
FS: For about 10 years. It's on my pc, on Excel. With columns for the game style, the strong points, the weak ones and the tactical aspect. Many of those players have retired now! (laughs) It happened that some players ask me for infos on a future opponent. I tell them what I think after I have a look at my files. When I retire, I hope somebody asks me to give them so that they are still usefull.

TM: But in what are they usefull to you?
FS: When I say tactic column, it's the tactic of the first 30 minutes. Sometimes, the infos I have on my pc just don't match with the reality of the day. I thus have to forget about the files and change my tactic.

TM: French players must, of course, be part of your notes. What do our players lack so that one stands out and wins GS?
FS: We haven't had any GS winner for 23 years. But we've been close sometimes. First with Leconte in 1988, then Cédric, twice, Arnaud in Australia and several semis. Concerning the new generation, I'd say that Gasquet and Monfils must have on their mind to win 1 GS.

TM: Do you think that they got the potential?
FS: There's still work ahead. But they both are very good players who have to think about playing GSs in order to win them. As well as, althrough the year, furnish all requested efforts and sacrifices to give themselves the best chances to win those tournaments. Maybe not in the nearest future. But when you see how seriously Gaël trains, the improvements he's made for 1 year and a half, if he keeps on that way, he's gonna become a damn good player. As for Richard, he's a tennis genius, he does everything perfectly, and he works well too. My feeling is that he has to get stronger physically, to be able one day to win a GS, and particularly RG. That said, that's a luck you don't need to have Nadal's physical to win RG. Otherwise, better pulling out of the event! We've played each other twice in 2005. The 1st time, I've been lucky to win after 3 hours 15 minutes and saving 1 MP. And the 2nd time, he's won after 3 hours and a half, saving 3 MPs. Such matches leave traces on the legs, but it also creates bounds, they're great moments. I like training, by the way, with Gaël and Richard.

TM: And what do you think about the arrival of the Team Lagardère in tennis? The Paris Jean Bouin, the Team Lagardère, etc...Do you see some competition for the Federation in those initiatives?
FS: I think that the arrival of Lagardère, that's pretty good for French tennis. He's done a lot for Richard and Gaël for 2 years. If tomorrow, the Federation and Lagardère could work together, that would be just extraordinary. That's what should be done, logically. If they happened to rival each other, that would be very bad. Both forces are complementary. They aim the same goals, have the same passion. Why competing?

TM: With all your experience, does the Federation sometimes consult you on tennis stuff?
FS: No. I might be asked about my opinion concerning RG's evolution. As a player. But that's all.

TM: French tennis has mostly been highlighted lately, thanks to Amélie Mauresmo. What do you think about her success?
FS: Amélie, I've been following her for a long time, I know her career very well. I like her a lot, she's extremely attaching. The whole country had been waiting for her 1st victory in a GS for a few years. That has happened the furthest possible, in Australia, at a time she wasn't really expected. All the other girls were there, whereas Amélie had had opportunities during events where many had pulled out. And though there were Sharapova, Clijsters, Hénin, and Davenport in the last remaining players, that's Amélie who wins it. That's all but chance. Ok, she may have been a bit lucky. But luck, you provoke it, and she's done it thanks to a very hard work. She's super serious. Despite some past disappointments, despite being sometimes criticized, she's never given up. Hence, that's all the more deserved.

TM: We've talked about the opponents, but there are also your partners. Have you listed them?
FS: No, but I know I've won tournaments with 8 or 9 different partners.

TM: Which one of those have you felt more comfortable with?
FS: I'd say Olivier Delaître and Mika. With Delaître, we would have won more if, at that time, I had been stronger physically. And I also played 3 DC finals with 3 different partners: Delaître, Pioline and Escudé.

TM: With Pioline in Australia, it was though at a time it was tense between you?...
FS: Yes, but now, we enjoy seeing each other with Cédric, visiting each other and drinking a good bottle. And even today, this victory in Australia remains among the greatest moments of my career. Here are the photos by the way...(skimming through the pages of an album about the French victory in 2001). The Berçy final, together with Nicolas, has also been a great moment. I've been lucky. I wasn't asking for so much.

TM: Talking about the doubles, what do you think of the new rules that have been set this year?
FS: I'm for the tiebreak, 1st reaching 10 points, instead of a 3rd set. And I'm against the No-Ad. I think it gives too big a place to chance, to some stroke of luck.

TM: And when it appeared that the existence of the doubles was threatened, how did you react?
FS: They can't sacrifice the doubles and make it so important in DC. Or, they also pull it off DC. You can't say, 4 weekends a year, the Saturday point is capital and not giving a damn the rest of the time. So, finding a setting more adapted to the tour rhythm so that the best singles players can also play doubles, I agree with that. But cancelling doubles would be a huge mistake. I'm all the more convinced about this as it is thanks to doubles that I've boosted my career.

TM: Paraphrasing the title of a recent movie where the main frameset was about tennis, would you say that your family is your "greatest victory"?
FS: That's my pride. My big pride. My priority today. I keep on playing tennis because of passion. I love fighting, I love coping with the best. I know I have an incredible luck. But I know that all this will end in some months, some years. On the other hand, I hope my family life will keep up till the last days of my life. Today, Chris longs for me to stop. She involves herself 100% in my matches because she just supports me when I play. But when we come back home, she asks me: so, when are you gonna retire? Me, I'm really torn in my reasoning, because I'm longing for all to stop and I always want it to go on.

TM: Yet, there's been a 1st break in your career in 1991, when you haven't been selected to play against the US team in Lyon for the DC final. You had said yourself that you had needed several months to recover and your father had spoken about moral injury.
FS: When I look at it now, the selection that was made had nothing unadmitteable. It was even probably normal, yes that's the 1st time I state it...Yannick (Noah) must have had good reasons. The only thing is that, at that time, I've been considered a "normal player" whereas I was just a baby. Who had played the QFs, the semis but who was only 18. And I didn't have the weapons to accept that 1st disappointment in my career. That's why I've received it right into my face, why it hurt me so much. Not the choice in itself, but the way it all happened, the fact that I should have been explained the way you explain things to a child. But later, I've had the opportunity to talk about it with Yannick Noah, one day I was visiting him at home, in Nainville les Roches, in 1995. We had talked, next to the swimmingpool, and it was just great for me to be able to talk about it some years after it happened. And today, I will never forget that it's Yannick who first gave me my chance in DC. It's also him who opened up his house, when he was living in Switzerland, when I was looking for a restaurant to celebrate my 30s, on December 9th 2002. Yannick is somebody I like a lot.

TM: With DC, you've gone from ecstasy to sadness. The great moments you've lived through it, do they remain on top of your career achievements?
FS: Yes, of course...My first steps: Nîmes in 1991. In 1999, we lose in the final but it still was a great year. In 2001, we bring the trophy home from Australia, which was totally unexpectable, an extraordinary exploit. In 2002, we lose against Russia, in Berçy, but in such an incredible mood. And in that same year, the semi in RG against the Americans, a very big moment. So yes, the joys and the grieves, DC has been the competition of the extremes for me. That's also because that's the one I like the most. Hence, I'm always sensible to it.

TM: Yet, given all that you've just told us, how do you explain there have been misunderstanding moments between you and the captain? Without hinting at recent events, we can remember a match totally blown out against Belgium in 1997 and harsh words of Noah after that. There have been other communications difficulties. Why, according to you?
FS: If there are ups and downs, that's first because my career is pretty long. If it had lasted 4 years, there certainly would have been less worries! Then, it's also a competition where there's always so much passion as well as craze that it causes troubles. And at the end of the day, that's the only competition in tennis where the player depends on somebody else. Because a tennis player is undoubtedly the independent worker par excellence. That's him who hires his coach, his physical trainer, who builds up his programm, me, I do everything. And, at one moment, I lose control. Maybe that's what I've had trouble with. But it would be taking such a huge shortcut than forgetting about all the joys the event brought me.

TM: Maybe, you love that competition too much?
FS: Maybe. But I've given the very best of myself in DC. During the finals in 2001 and 2002, I've undeniably played the best doubles matches of my whole life.

TM: That's weird. You were previously listing 1999 among the good memories whereas in the doubles, with Olivier Delaître, things didn't go that well.
FS: The 1999 final is a bad memory, from the beginning til the end. It's been a general failure. We missed it. With the players, the staff. We all made mistakes, and it just led us into the wall.

TM: You don't wanna talk about the current situation of French team, which caused you to be excluded against Germany. But do you admit that the public wants to know why and how things reached that point?
FS: Yes, I think so.

TM: So why these silences and those insinuations from one part as well as the other? Isn't it natural that supporters of French tennis want their fittest players to play for France?
FS: Of course. (Long silence) Maybe that's too simple. Me too, I'd like to understand. I don't know. Today, the situation is what it is. I don't know if I ever will play again in DC.

TM: Are you still hoping for it to happen?
FS: (firmly) Yes!

TM: Do you want to explain, face to face, with Guy Forget?
FS: Yes. And that is likely to occur during the upcoming weeks. And more than likely, still 3 or 4 years after I've retired. Me, I think that everybody can work with everybody. Especially when you have the same goal.

TM: That deep emotion you've shown in Tarbes, reading your press release, points out your level of attachment to that competition...
FS: For sure I'm sad about that. When I was in Australia, I've reached a goal I had been running after for so long. I've told myself I needed another motivation. I had already found it, it was just immediate: DC. That was great. I've been all the more disappointed that I wasn't with them in Germany.

TM: What would you like to do when you stop competing?
FS: Giving time to my family. And stay within tennis world. Not as a coach, because I don't want that hellish rhythm anymore. Find myself new challenges. I've already got other interests, I have a passion for long for property market. I'm following it closely. I'm visiting a lot of things. I've moved out several times, I like that. Today, we owe that house which is, for me, pretty original, as well as a leisure house in the South of France.

TM: In that "outside tennis" category, you had once said in an interview that you would "never" enter politics. Yet, you sometimes appear next to Nicolas Sarkozy...Do politics interest you now?
FS: Nicolas, he's a friend. For about 10 years now. That's somebody I like a lot, a friend, and as he's into politics, I'm getting interested, as a matter of fact, in politics. I'm following his career, closely, and he also follows mine. I often call him, to ask him for his opinion. He's got an incredible insight. He's got that ability to analyze situations, to see things much faster than anybody else and he's always of good advice.

TM: Are you a militant of UMP?
FS: No, I don't have any membership card. But, I don't hesitate to support him, publicly, whenever I can, as I had done in his big meeting in Le Bourget.

TM: Let's come back to DC. The role of the captain, could you be tempted by it one day?
FS: No retired player could be indifferent to the idea of having such a job.
__________________
Best of LUCK to ALL my Faves in 2014
Choupi is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2006, 09:14 AM   #24
country flag Action Jackson
Forum Umpire:
Gaston Gaudio
 
Action Jackson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 124,477
Action Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Fabrice News and Articles

Fantastic translation and good to see some in-depth interviews for a change and Fab likes Excel, who'd have thought.
__________________
On Nadal bumping him on the changeover, Rosol said: "It's ok, he wanted to take my concentration; I knew he would try something".


Wilander on Dimitrov - "He has mind set on imitating Federer and yes it looks good. But he has no idea what to do on the court".

Quote:
Originally Posted by Filo V. View Post
I definitely would have preferred Gaba winning as he needs the points much more, but Jan would have beaten him anyway. I expect Hajek to destroy Machado, like 6-1 6-2.
Machado wins 6-2 6-1
Action Jackson is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2006, 05:27 PM   #25
16681
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Fabrice News and Articles





Choupi there are just no words to tell you how wonderful it was for you to take the time to translate all that information on Santoro And Santoro is such an interesting person But I can't find out anything about the name Santoro
View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2006, 07:59 AM   #26
country flag Action Jackson
Forum Umpire:
Gaston Gaudio
 
Action Jackson's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 124,477
Action Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond reputeAction Jackson has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Fabrice News and Articles

Santoro is an Italian last name.
__________________
On Nadal bumping him on the changeover, Rosol said: "It's ok, he wanted to take my concentration; I knew he would try something".


Wilander on Dimitrov - "He has mind set on imitating Federer and yes it looks good. But he has no idea what to do on the court".

Quote:
Originally Posted by Filo V. View Post
I definitely would have preferred Gaba winning as he needs the points much more, but Jan would have beaten him anyway. I expect Hajek to destroy Machado, like 6-1 6-2.
Machado wins 6-2 6-1
Action Jackson is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2006, 08:52 AM   #27
country flag Choupi
Registered User
 
Choupi's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Age: 41
Posts: 20,073
Choupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond reputeChoupi has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Fabrice News and Articles

Fab is from Italian descent, but he was born in Tahiti......on a particular day!! Or should I say special day?
__________________
Best of LUCK to ALL my Faves in 2014
Choupi is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2006, 02:59 PM   #28
country flag tangerine_dream
Last dance, Andy
 
tangerine_dream's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: New York New Englander
Posts: 25,413
tangerine_dream has a reputation beyond reputetangerine_dream has a reputation beyond reputetangerine_dream has a reputation beyond reputetangerine_dream has a reputation beyond reputetangerine_dream has a reputation beyond reputetangerine_dream has a reputation beyond reputetangerine_dream has a reputation beyond reputetangerine_dream has a reputation beyond reputetangerine_dream has a reputation beyond reputetangerine_dream has a reputation beyond reputetangerine_dream has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Fabrice News and Articles

Thanks so much for that interview, Choupi.
__________________
"What kind of shape am I in now? Well round is a shape." said Roddick with a laugh. "I had a very detailed retirement plan, and I feel like I've met every aspect of it: a lot of golf, a lot of carbs, a lot of fried food, and some booze, occasionally — I've been completely committed ... The results have shown."


Mugs Tennis Forums
tangerine_dream is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 04-01-2006, 03:45 AM   #29
16681
 
Posts: n/a
Default Re: Fabrice News and Articles

Quote:
Originally Posted by Choupi
Fab is from Italian descent, but he was born in Tahiti......on a particular day!! Or should I say special day?
Santoro is of Italian descent? The name didn't look French to me, but I must say it doesn't look Italian to me either When I see the name I think of someone who is Spanish. Why I don't know
View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2006, 08:59 AM   #30
country flag Truc
Registered User
 
Truc's Avatar
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Berlin
Posts: 17,349
Truc has a reputation beyond reputeTruc has a reputation beyond reputeTruc has a reputation beyond reputeTruc has a reputation beyond reputeTruc has a reputation beyond reputeTruc has a reputation beyond reputeTruc has a reputation beyond reputeTruc has a reputation beyond reputeTruc has a reputation beyond reputeTruc has a reputation beyond reputeTruc has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Fabrice News and Articles

There is an interview of Fabrice in the new issue of "Grand Chelem" (http://www.grandchelem.net), you can download it here:
http://www.sportagence.com/gc/GC2.pdf
(page 18 - it's a series of articles and interviews about the "pleasure in tennis" - in French, of course, sorry )
Truc is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


Copyright (C) Verticalscope Inc
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
vBCredits v1.4 Copyright ©2007, PixelFX Studios