Novak News!! - Page 224 - MensTennisForums.com

MensTennisForums.com

MenstennisForums.com is the premier Men's Tennis forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.Please Register - It's Free!

Closed Thread

Old 11-29-2010, 08:11 PM   #3346
country flag Nole fan
The new era of SuperNovak
 
Nole fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 14,360
Nole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Novak News!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by mlle mila View Post
from peter bodo blog



by Hannah Wilks, TW Contributing Writer

On the protracted journey to North Greenwich this morning (London transport is laboring under major engineering works and facing a tube strike), almost every conversation I overhear is a discussion of Federer and Nadal. It makes me so pleased that on a weekend when the first Ashes test is underway, England have taken on South Africa at Twickenham, and the usual round of high-profile Premiership football clashes are on—Spurs v Liverpool being today's hot ticket—tennis can still fill the O2 arena.

It also makes me feel slightly ashamed of myself for not being more excited. As far as I'm concerned, the greatest rivalry in sport—as I understand we're now obligated to call it—reached its zenith at Wimbledon 2008 when Rafa carved out the heart of Roger's empire and more or less devoured it, and since then it's basically been one-way traffic. Rafa is the best player in the world right now, Roger has had one of the greatest careers; these things seem obvious to me. They don't even play each other that much—twice in 2009, and this their second meeting in 2010—meaning that their rivalry is mainly played out in records and statistics, and on their behalf in forums and blogs across the internet by their fans .
(................................................. .................................................. .........) all the talks about the match
..
But it has been a week of great entertainment, of tennis that's encompassed the entire range from execrable to exceptional. It's given the ATP a chance to showcase their product, and London an opportunity to demonstrate another facet of its nature as a tennis city. On a personal level, it's been a week of staying up until 3 a.m., trying to find the right words for the best players in the world; a week when taking longhand notes during Nadal matches left my fingers blistered, and Djokovic's smile distracted me enough that I left my mobile phone in his press conference. (He didn't call.)

It may not quite be the 'fifth Slam' just yet—but it's been a bloody good week all the same.
Galouises is a Nole fan.
__________________

Either you get him or you don't.

Novak Djokovic nº1!

The Golden Era of Novak: Australian Open * Dubai * Indian Wells * Miami * Belgrade * Madrid * Rome * Wimbledon * Montreal * US Open * Abu Dhabi * Australian Open * Miami * Toronto * China * Shanghai * World Tour Finals 2012 * Australian Open 2013 * Dubai * Montecarlo * Beijing * Shanghai * Paris * WTF * Indian Wells * Miami * Rome * WIMBLEDON 2014
Federer to Nole: "Amazing year. Amazing tournament. Amazing match. You are THE BEST!"
Nole fan is offline View My Blog!  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 

Old 11-29-2010, 10:01 PM   #3347
country flag Nole fan
The new era of SuperNovak
 
Nole fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 14,360
Nole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Novak News!!

http://www.barclaysatpworldtourfinal...of-Tennis.aspx

Late money for Andy Roddick's Art Of Tennis self-portrait pushed the winning bid to $33,100. Portraits by Rafael Nadal ($26,500) and Novak Djokovic ($22,103) also brought big money for charity on the final day of the auction of artworks by all eight singles players who competed at the 2010 Barclays ATP World Tour Finals. Roger Federer' self-portrait raised $27,300, taking the total amount raised by the auction to US$127,755.

Wow. Novak's got $22,103 for his portrait!
Weird that Murray only sold for $7,301.
__________________

Either you get him or you don't.

Novak Djokovic nº1!

The Golden Era of Novak: Australian Open * Dubai * Indian Wells * Miami * Belgrade * Madrid * Rome * Wimbledon * Montreal * US Open * Abu Dhabi * Australian Open * Miami * Toronto * China * Shanghai * World Tour Finals 2012 * Australian Open 2013 * Dubai * Montecarlo * Beijing * Shanghai * Paris * WTF * Indian Wells * Miami * Rome * WIMBLEDON 2014
Federer to Nole: "Amazing year. Amazing tournament. Amazing match. You are THE BEST!"
Nole fan is offline View My Blog!  
Old 11-29-2010, 11:29 PM   #3348
country flag shuhrat
Registered User
 
Join Date: Mar 2008
Posts: 7,752
shuhrat has a reputation beyond reputeshuhrat has a reputation beyond reputeshuhrat has a reputation beyond reputeshuhrat has a reputation beyond reputeshuhrat has a reputation beyond reputeshuhrat has a reputation beyond reputeshuhrat has a reputation beyond reputeshuhrat has a reputation beyond reputeshuhrat has a reputation beyond reputeshuhrat has a reputation beyond reputeshuhrat has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Novak News!!

It might affect the final auction price that Murray's ended a few days earlier.
I've never used ebay, so have no idea how this works generally though, some bidding patterns of them look a bit strange to me. Not complaining, just saying.

Nole Roddick Nadal Federer Murray Berdych Soderling Ferrer
shuhrat is offline View My Blog!  
Old 11-29-2010, 11:31 PM   #3349
country flag Nole fan
The new era of SuperNovak
 
Nole fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 14,360
Nole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Novak News!!

Another Galouises gem. I wonder if Bodo will finally retire and give her the column? It would be a very good decision me thinks.
I like how she gets Nole better than anyone.

Two "Characters" in Search of a Semi

by Hannah Wilks, TW Contributing Writer

Sometimes you expect much more from a match than it delivers. This has been the case a lot this week, whether because of the weaknesses and flaws inherent in the round robin format or because sometimes it just happens that way. The strength of the ATP is so concentrated in its elite players that even among the top eight, a natural division has quickly emerged between the best and the rest. Three semi-finalists have already been settled, with the fourth to be determined by tonight's clash.

Surely this one won't disappoint. Two players from whom one never knows quite what to expect; Novak Djokovic, an unpredictable firecracker, prone to lapses of concentration and bizarre physical reversals, and Roddick, the workhorse who can be relied upon to give his all, but whose game can run the gamut from almost unbeatable to ineffectual.

Their head-to-head is 5-2 in Roddick's favour, which in theory looks one-sided, but most of those wins have come for the American during Djokovic's prolonged slump. I understand it's strange to use the word to describe the progress of a consistent trophy-lifter who has been, during his 'decline', as high as no. 2 in the world. But since Wimbledon 2008, Djokovic's game has touched for periods on every variant of toothless. His serve has been broken down and rebuilt, he's visibly struggled for confidence. He's often looked like a shadow of the cocky upstart who barged on to a world stage dominated by Federer and Nadal and demanded that they yield the floor.

But all of that has seemed like ancient history since Djokovic's September resurgence in New York, wher he defeated Federer and stretched Nadal in the final of the US Open. Surely this time he can take it to Roddick.

An extra frisson is added by the fact that at times these two don't seem to like each other very much. Whatever latent animosity exist came to the fore following Djokovic's last victory over Roddick at the 2008 US Open, when the Serb's attempts to retaliate against Roddick's mockery saw him booed by the New York crowds. That the spat was public seems inevitable, as both have well-deserved reputations for being entertainers, earned with Djokovic's impersonations and willingness to make fun of himself, Andy Roddick's sardonic wit in press conferences and on chat shows. They're frequently referred to as 'characters', actively seeking to be larger than life.

One thing that doesn't disappoint is Djokovic's entrance. Aware of the fact that the abiding impression he has made this week came when contact lens problems derailed what promised to be a classic encounter with Nadal, he takes the court accessorizing his grave expression with a rakish black eye patch. Solemnly letting the small mascot lead him to his chair, he fits the eyepatch on to her head and sends her on her way. It's possible to read the stunt as a plea for affection, but the twitch of his lips, betraying his own enjoyment, suggests that in the final analysis he did it because he knew he would relish the joke more than anyone. It's a generous piece of slapstick, and the crowd love it. It's hard to imagine Roddick doing the same thing.

There's an odd, tense atmosphere. The crowd are more well-oiled than usual, enthusiastic but ragged, with no consensus favorite. Someone yells out during Djokovic's service motion and is roundly tutted for his pains. On the evidence of the first few games, it's going to be a proper tussle - maybe not in terms of quality of tennis, but it promises to be a prolonged bout of psychological grappling. Roddick pushes from the baseline, mixing up spins and pace, giving the Serb all the rope he needs to hang himself. It works; the rallies end more often than not with an error from Djokovic. Seduced into these circuitous exchanges, Djokovic's aggressive instincts seem to desert him. It's puzzling; how can Djokovic be out-defended when he's so much better at it? The simple answer is that Roddick seems to bring out the worst in Djokovic.

But Djokovic has come a long way. He rapidly gathers himself and finds purpose and aggression. As soon as he starts hitting forehands moving forward into the court, everything is different. You expect Roddick to hold his ground, but as soon as he meets with resistance, he crumbles, giving up the first service break with a backhand slice that drifts wide. He holds the next game, but cannot find the wherewithal to finish points. At one point, he was obliged to wait for Djokovic's third defensive, desperate lob to get the miss. Roddick gives up the set - and I do mean gives up - with another unforced error long over the baseline, and we plunge deep into the realms of the anti-climactic.

Djokovic has qualified for the semi-finals, and he knows it. All that is left on the line for the American is pride. It seems like that should be enough, but he still cannot capitalise on the momentary lack of attention with which Djokovic starts the second set. In fact, it's the American who is lacking in intensity. The usual audible heavy breathing, the huffing and puffing like a steam engine which seems to get him around the court, is absent. After a failed Hawkeye challenge, Roddick stares at the umpire with obvious displeasure. The crowd cheers, hoping for Roddick to shed his patience and get fired up. But his unbelievably passive play continues. Roddick has had his health issues this year, but this seems almost a trend, and it's worrying. How can such an energetic and forceful person play so timidly?

One could also ask how someone as complex as Djokovic, with all the faults and fissures of his past, can play a game so miraculously smooth? I could watch him hit all night, not that Roddick seems likely to enable it. I've been searching for an image that describes the flight of his groundstrokes, when it comes to me; the limpid parabola of a stone skimmed across water. There's so much talent evident in every stroke. It's exciting to watch, simply because we don't know yet how his week, his year, his career, will turn out.

Roddick, it is plain, has no surprises left. He makes a gallant last stand to hold his final service game, but succumbs on yet another unforced error long over the baseline. He leaves London with no wins, but the crowd cheer him out of the arena with an affection that clearly demonstrates that Roddick is best-liked these days as a plucky loser.

Djokovic stays to chat, joking with the crowd, friendly and adrenaline-drunk. He's twenty-three years old and has proved he has the ability to stay in the mix; he has unnumbered chances left to shape the rest of his story. Roddick's opportunities are growing few and far between; his time in London has already run out.
__________________

Either you get him or you don't.

Novak Djokovic nº1!

The Golden Era of Novak: Australian Open * Dubai * Indian Wells * Miami * Belgrade * Madrid * Rome * Wimbledon * Montreal * US Open * Abu Dhabi * Australian Open * Miami * Toronto * China * Shanghai * World Tour Finals 2012 * Australian Open 2013 * Dubai * Montecarlo * Beijing * Shanghai * Paris * WTF * Indian Wells * Miami * Rome * WIMBLEDON 2014
Federer to Nole: "Amazing year. Amazing tournament. Amazing match. You are THE BEST!"
Nole fan is offline View My Blog!  
Old 11-30-2010, 05:54 PM   #3350
country flag mlle mila
Registered User
 
mlle mila's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: paris
Posts: 798
mlle mila has a reputation beyond reputemlle mila has a reputation beyond reputemlle mila has a reputation beyond reputemlle mila has a reputation beyond reputemlle mila has a reputation beyond reputemlle mila has a reputation beyond reputemlle mila has a reputation beyond reputemlle mila has a reputation beyond reputemlle mila has a reputation beyond reputemlle mila has a reputation beyond reputemlle mila has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Novak News!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nole fan View Post
Another Galouises gem. I wonder if Bodo will finally retire and give her the column? It would be a very good decision me thinks.
I like how she gets Nole better than anyone.

Two "Characters" in Search of a Semi

by Hannah Wilks, TW Contributing Writer

Sometimes you expect much more from a match than it delivers. This has been the case a lot this week, whether because of the weaknesses and flaws inherent in the round robin format or because sometimes it just happens that way. The strength of the ATP is so concentrated in its elite players that even among the top eight, a natural division has quickly emerged between the best and the rest. Three semi-finalists have already been settled, with the fourth to be determined by tonight's clash.

Surely this one won't disappoint. Two players from whom one never knows quite what to expect; Novak Djokovic, an unpredictable firecracker, prone to lapses of concentration and bizarre physical reversals, and Roddick, the workhorse who can be relied upon to give his all, but whose game can run the gamut from almost unbeatable to ineffectual.

Their head-to-head is 5-2 in Roddick's favour, which in theory looks one-sided, but most of those wins have come for the American during Djokovic's prolonged slump. I understand it's strange to use the word to describe the progress of a consistent trophy-lifter who has been, during his 'decline', as high as no. 2 in the world. But since Wimbledon 2008, Djokovic's game has touched for periods on every variant of toothless. His serve has been broken down and rebuilt, he's visibly struggled for confidence. He's often looked like a shadow of the cocky upstart who barged on to a world stage dominated by Federer and Nadal and demanded that they yield the floor.

But all of that has seemed like ancient history since Djokovic's September resurgence in New York, wher he defeated Federer and stretched Nadal in the final of the US Open. Surely this time he can take it to Roddick.

An extra frisson is added by the fact that at times these two don't seem to like each other very much. Whatever latent animosity exist came to the fore following Djokovic's last victory over Roddick at the 2008 US Open, when the Serb's attempts to retaliate against Roddick's mockery saw him booed by the New York crowds. That the spat was public seems inevitable, as both have well-deserved reputations for being entertainers, earned with Djokovic's impersonations and willingness to make fun of himself, Andy Roddick's sardonic wit in press conferences and on chat shows. They're frequently referred to as 'characters', actively seeking to be larger than life.

One thing that doesn't disappoint is Djokovic's entrance. Aware of the fact that the abiding impression he has made this week came when contact lens problems derailed what promised to be a classic encounter with Nadal, he takes the court accessorizing his grave expression with a rakish black eye patch. Solemnly letting the small mascot lead him to his chair, he fits the eyepatch on to her head and sends her on her way. It's possible to read the stunt as a plea for affection, but the twitch of his lips, betraying his own enjoyment, suggests that in the final analysis he did it because he knew he would relish the joke more than anyone. It's a generous piece of slapstick, and the crowd love it. It's hard to imagine Roddick doing the same thing.

There's an odd, tense atmosphere. The crowd are more well-oiled than usual, enthusiastic but ragged, with no consensus favorite. Someone yells out during Djokovic's service motion and is roundly tutted for his pains. On the evidence of the first few games, it's going to be a proper tussle - maybe not in terms of quality of tennis, but it promises to be a prolonged bout of psychological grappling. Roddick pushes from the baseline, mixing up spins and pace, giving the Serb all the rope he needs to hang himself. It works; the rallies end more often than not with an error from Djokovic. Seduced into these circuitous exchanges, Djokovic's aggressive instincts seem to desert him. It's puzzling; how can Djokovic be out-defended when he's so much better at it? The simple answer is that Roddick seems to bring out the worst in Djokovic.

But Djokovic has come a long way. He rapidly gathers himself and finds purpose and aggression. As soon as he starts hitting forehands moving forward into the court, everything is different. You expect Roddick to hold his ground, but as soon as he meets with resistance, he crumbles, giving up the first service break with a backhand slice that drifts wide. He holds the next game, but cannot find the wherewithal to finish points. At one point, he was obliged to wait for Djokovic's third defensive, desperate lob to get the miss. Roddick gives up the set - and I do mean gives up - with another unforced error long over the baseline, and we plunge deep into the realms of the anti-climactic.

Djokovic has qualified for the semi-finals, and he knows it. All that is left on the line for the American is pride. It seems like that should be enough, but he still cannot capitalise on the momentary lack of attention with which Djokovic starts the second set. In fact, it's the American who is lacking in intensity. The usual audible heavy breathing, the huffing and puffing like a steam engine which seems to get him around the court, is absent. After a failed Hawkeye challenge, Roddick stares at the umpire with obvious displeasure. The crowd cheers, hoping for Roddick to shed his patience and get fired up. But his unbelievably passive play continues. Roddick has had his health issues this year, but this seems almost a trend, and it's worrying. How can such an energetic and forceful person play so timidly?

One could also ask how someone as complex as Djokovic, with all the faults and fissures of his past, can play a game so miraculously smooth? I could watch him hit all night, not that Roddick seems likely to enable it. I've been searching for an image that describes the flight of his groundstrokes, when it comes to me; the limpid parabola of a stone skimmed across water. There's so much talent evident in every stroke. It's exciting to watch, simply because we don't know yet how his week, his year, his career, will turn out. Roddick, it is plain, has no surprises left. He makes a gallant last stand to hold his final service game, but succumbs on yet another unforced error long over the baseline. He leaves London with no wins, but the crowd cheer him out of the arena with an affection that clearly demonstrates that Roddick is best-liked these days as a plucky loser.

Djokovic stays to chat, joking with the crowd, friendly and adrenaline-drunk. He's twenty-three years old and has proved he has the ability to stay in the mix; he has unnumbered chances left to shape the rest of his story. Roddick's opportunities are growing few and far between; his time in London has already run out.

it's the most beautiful thing I've read about novak ' s game . Hannah and yes it will be great if she writes more often .
mlle mila is offline View My Blog!  
Old 12-01-2010, 05:37 PM   #3351
country flag Amber Spyglass
Registered User
 
Amber Spyglass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: "I think we are in rats alley,where the dead men lost their bones"
Posts: 2,692
Amber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Novak News!!

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/02/sp...er=rss&emc=rss

Special Report: Davis Cup Final
Behind Serbia's Rise, a Star and His Family
By CHRISTOPHER CLAREY
Published: December 1, 2010

KOPAONIK, SERBIA — To begin to understand how a small, struggling nation like Serbia managed to reach its first Davis Cup final this weekend, you could interview Slobodan Zivojinovic, a big-serving Serbian trailblazer at Wimbledon and elsewhere before he became a portly tennis administrator and car salesman.
Straight Sets


You could delve into tomes that explain the stubborn, resilient character of the Serbs, whose territory and autonomy have been overrun repeatedly but whose identity and sense of mission endure. You could spend an afternoon in Belgrade’s tennis clubs, where members once played on when NATO bombs were falling in 1999.

But if you have to pick just one essential starting point, perhaps it is best to drive south from the capital toward the still-disputed border with Kosovo and follow the serpentine mountain road to Kopaonik, Serbia’s leading ski resort. Like so much of this diminished nation, Kopaonik has seen better days and is preparing to see them again.

It was here that Novak Djokovic’s family, much more familiar with schussing down slopes than hitting balls over nets, once operated several small businesses — including a pizzeria, sports equipment shop and art gallery — on the ground floor of a large complex during the winter and summer months. And it was here that the state-owned Yugoslav company Genex, which developed much of Kopaonik, chose to build three tennis courts just across the parking lot from where the Djokovics opened their Red Bull restaurant and creperie in the late 1980s.

Now full of cracks, holes and undulations, the green hardcourts are hardly a playground for the game’s elite. It is hard to believe that the planet’s third-best player, the man who held off Roger Federer at the U.S. Open in September, emerged from this.

If some planner had chosen a different recreational destiny for this plot of land, perhaps young Novak would have become a competitive skier, like his father, Srdjan, and uncle, Goran, and the French Davis Cup team would not be bracing to compete in the din of a sold-out final in Belgrade Arena from Friday to Sunday.

But even with those three courts in plain view in Kopaonik, Novak needed a mentor, someone with the requisite charisma and clout to show him that however isolated this place, however unlikely the prospect, these courts could be the path to something much grander.

“It was the first day of my first year in Kopaonik, and I was doing a tennis camp,” said Jelena Gencic, a leading tennis coach and former professional player. “And he was just standing outside the tennis courts and watching all morning, and I said: ‘Hey little boy, do you like it? Do you know what this is?”’

That summer afternoon in 1993, Novak, just 6 years old, accepted Gencic’s invitation and returned to take part in the clinic himself. He arrived carrying a gym bag with his belongings well in order, just like the professionals he admired via satellite television.

“One racket, towel, bottle with water, one banana, a dry extra T-shirt, wrist band and the cap,” Gencic recalled recently. “And I said: ‘O.K., who prepared your bag? Your mother?’ And oh, he was very angry. He said, ‘No, I am playing tennis.”’

He began playing in earnest, aided enormously and at just the critical moment by Gencic, the same cultivated and intuitive coach who had helped shape the games of the future Grand Slam champions Monica Seles and Goran Ivanisevic.

“Pretty much what I know on court, I owe to her,” Djokovic said of Gencic, a former leading tennis player and member of Yugoslavia’s team handball squad.

It was Gencic who taught him the grips and fundamentals; Gencic who provided him inspiration with Pushkin poems and classical music; Gencic who gently helped him arrive at the conclusion that he preferred to hit his backhand with two hands instead of the single hand used by his American idol, Pete Sampras. Just as important, it was Gencic who gave Djokovic’s parents, Srdjan and Dijana, along with Srdjan’s siblings, Goran and Jelena, the assurance that the boy had what it took to be something exceptional in a game whose subtleties they did not yet grasp.

“The third day, I called to see the father and mother for the first time, and I said, ‘You have a golden child,”’ Gencic, 74, recalled in an interview at a clay court in Belgrade where she still gives lessons. “I said the same thing about Monica Seles when she was 8.”

The Djokovics were stunned but ultimately inspired. They would need all the inspiration they could muster in the years ahead as they sacrificed security and scrambled for money in a disintegrating economy.

“Let’s say that Jelena Gencic gave us strength; she’s a serious woman,” said Goran Djokovic, who at 46 is four years younger than Srdjan. “We were all together as a family, and we had our project. It was not good times, there were sanctions and the war was starting. It was not an easy time for Serbia, for Yugoslavia, but all the money we had we invest in Novak. He had to be the one in front of the family who had to have everything he need — the new racket, the good food and everything. Of course we can live very easy if he didn’t play tennis, but we have a vision.”


The vision — maintained like a fireplace in winter by the strong-willed Srdjan — would require Novak to leave home at age 12 for the Munich academy run by the former top Yugoslav player Niki Pilic, a friend of Gencic’s. It would require loans, tight communal living quarters, tears and angst, but surprisingly little internal dissent in the family.
Straight Sets


“We didn’t want bad vibrations, only good energy, good energy,” Goran said. “But of course people were talking sometimes, saying: ‘This family is crazy, who do they think they are? How can they even think Novak will be something?”’

The family’s intense presence in the players’ boxes of the world — Srdjan and Dijana wore shirts bearing Novak’s portrait during the U.S. Open — might still rub some the wrong way. But Novak is certainly something now: a 2008 Australian Open champion and two-time U.S. Open finalist who, at 23, has won nearly $20 million in prize money and was recently named Serbia’s most eligible bachelor in an online newspaper poll (even though he is based in tax-friendly Monaco).

Now he will try to lead Serbia to its most prestigious sports title since the breakup of Yugoslavia, and he will do so at no small risk to his results next season, pushing his body for an extra week instead of joining his rivals Federer and Rafael Nadal, who have already started their short winter vacation breaks.

“It is a risk, but it is a price I feel is worth paying,” Djokovic said in a lengthy interview last month.

His picture can be found on posters throughout Belgrade as he swings a broom instead of a tennis racket as part of a national campaign to “Keep Serbia Clean.” It’s a pitch that can be absorbed on multiple levels in a society still struggling to root out corruption.

In New Belgrade, below the offices of the Djokovics’ four-year-old company, Family Sport, sits Novak Restaurant, an upscale eatery filled with well-dressed patrons and television screens showing highlights from Novak’s matches. A display case is filled with Novak lighters, key chains, pens.

The branding of Novak Djokovic takes on a more solemn air upstairs in Srdjan’s office, where a religious painting shows the late Patriarch Pavle, head of the Serbian Orthodox church, with Novak’s face painted in luminous tones below him. Goran played down its implications.

“We don’t want to make an icon of Novak, but people are always trying to put him up there,” he said. “It’s a fight to keep normal.”

Back in the older part of the city is the most concrete evidence of Djokovic’s impact. There, at the confluence of the Danube and Sava Rivers, sits the club that he and his family and other investors built. It is the site of a two-year-old A.T.P. event, the Serbian Open, which is owned and operated by the family. It is also the prospective site of Novak’s tennis academy, potentially a cooperative effort with the IMG Bollettieri Academy in Florida, where one of Djokovic’s younger brothers, Djordje, 15, now trains.

An ornate room just off the club entrance in Belgrade houses Novak’s Olympic bronze medal from Beijing, his Australian Open trophy and other major prizes. But Srdjan and Goran have shipped in a memento of their own. Although the Red Bull restaurant in Kopaonik is now closed, shut down because of increased commitments and a new landlord, the brick pizza oven that once generated revenue in the mountains is now the centerpiece of the new Red Bull café at the Belgrade club and a reminder of how far the family has come since Srdjan used to cheer them up by showing them photos of the fancy cars they might own when Novak became a star.

“We don’t want to just be Novak’s uncle, Novak’s father, Novak’s aunt,” Goran said. “Novak has his business. His business is to play tennis. Our business is to run all this. We could put on the sunglasses and relax. But all of our lives we were in private business, even in the Communist time. So we try to build something for the future, for Novak and for Serbia.”

Total investment here so far? About €10 million, or $13 million, according to Goran, who is also the Serbian Open’s tournament director.

“Serbian history tells that the family is the most important thing and you have to stick with the family,” Novak said.

But Djokovic’s talent has not just served himself and his kin. His talent has served a bruised nation, one that has seen its territory shrink and shrink some more in the last 20 years as Yugoslavia cracked apart and Serbia was left with Montenegro and Kosovo and then left with nothing but itself and a reputation in as much need of repair as the war-damaged buildings in Belgrade.

But as the country has grown smaller, its tennis has grown bigger, with Ana Ivanovic and Jelena Jankovic both reaching No. 1 in the women’s game and with Djokovic shining brightest for the men but hardly shining alone, with his Davis Cup teammates Janko Tipsarevic, Viktor Troicki and Nenad Zimonjic all part of the surge. Tipsarevic and Troicki are in the top 50 in singles; Zimonjic, the group elder at age 34, is a former No. 1 player in doubles now ranked No. 3.

The bandwagon is getting heavier, and there are plans for the Serbian government, no major player until now, to fund a new national tennis center next year with at least five indoor courts, 15 outdoor courts and a residential complex. The estimated cost is €8 million to €9 million, according to Zivojinovic, 47, a Wimbledon semifinalist in 1985 who is now president of the Serbian Tennis Federation, with an annual budget of less than €2 million.

The paradox of shrinking Serbia and its tennis growth industry is not lost on Djokovic, for whom the Davis Cup final represents renewal.

“I think it is very symbolic, and I think it’s very much deserved — for the tennis team, for the country, for the sport — because we put a lot of effort into improving the image of our country in the recent years,” he said. “The history of our country is cruel. We have to face those issues or, should I say, we had to. Not anymore I hope, because we are going in the right direction, and we are ready to forgive, ready to move on.”

Although Djokovic once explored the possibility of representing Britain because of frustration with training conditions and government inertia in Serbia, he is ever more the Serbian patriot and has been vocal in opposition to Kosovo’s declaration of independence in 2008. He took the stance, in part, because Srdjan and his siblings — ethnic Serbs — were born in Kosovo.

It was the dispute over Kosovo that led to NATO’s bombing of Belgrade and other areas of the former Yugoslavia from March to June 1999. Gencic’s sister died in the bombing. But she said that she, Novak and others continued to play tennis in Belgrade, choosing areas that had been bombed the previous night on the assumption that they would not be bombed again so soon.

Djokovic expresses no bitterness, but plenty of emotion.

“We remember all these things and we will never forget, because it’s just very strong inside of you and very deep inside of you,” he said. “It’s traumatic experiences and so definitely you do have bad memories about it. We heard the alarm noise about planes coming to bomb us every single day a minimum of three times for two and a half months, huge noise in the city all the time, all the time. So in my case, when I hear a big noise even now, I get a little traumatized.”

But Djokovic, like his nation, has survived, and the big noises that will soon reverberate inside Belgrade Arena are not likely to have such negative effects.
Amber Spyglass is offline View My Blog!  
Old 12-01-2010, 07:24 PM   #3352
country flag Nole fan
The new era of SuperNovak
 
Nole fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 14,360
Nole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Novak News!!

Wow, amazing article. It makes me love Nole even more. He has got it quite difficult. But he's done ok.
__________________

Either you get him or you don't.

Novak Djokovic nº1!

The Golden Era of Novak: Australian Open * Dubai * Indian Wells * Miami * Belgrade * Madrid * Rome * Wimbledon * Montreal * US Open * Abu Dhabi * Australian Open * Miami * Toronto * China * Shanghai * World Tour Finals 2012 * Australian Open 2013 * Dubai * Montecarlo * Beijing * Shanghai * Paris * WTF * Indian Wells * Miami * Rome * WIMBLEDON 2014
Federer to Nole: "Amazing year. Amazing tournament. Amazing match. You are THE BEST!"
Nole fan is offline View My Blog!  
Old 12-01-2010, 07:40 PM   #3353
country flag Amber Spyglass
Registered User
 
Amber Spyglass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: "I think we are in rats alley,where the dead men lost their bones"
Posts: 2,692
Amber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Novak News!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nole fan View Post
Wow, amazing article. It makes me love Nole even more. He has got it quite difficult. But he's done ok.
“But of course people were talking sometimes, saying: ‘This family is crazy, who do they think they are? How can they even think Novak will be something?”’

I'd say there was quite a bit of that from the locals, if the family's popularity now(or lack of) is anything to go by

Also,Srdjan is four years older than Goran.I wouldn't say he looks older than Goran, well he's certainly holding his hair better than him

4 years between Srdjan and Goran and 4 years between Nole and Marko and Marko and Djole...must be a family rule
Amber Spyglass is offline View My Blog!  
Old 12-02-2010, 01:32 AM   #3354
country flag cheriamor
Registered User
 
cheriamor's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: The STL
Age: 25
Posts: 190
cheriamor has a reputation beyond reputecheriamor has a reputation beyond reputecheriamor has a reputation beyond reputecheriamor has a reputation beyond reputecheriamor has a reputation beyond reputecheriamor has a reputation beyond reputecheriamor has a reputation beyond reputecheriamor has a reputation beyond reputecheriamor has a reputation beyond reputecheriamor has a reputation beyond reputecheriamor has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Novak News!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Amber Spyglass View Post

That summer afternoon in 1993, Novak, just 6 years old, accepted Gencic’s invitation and returned to take part in the clinic himself. He arrived carrying a gym bag with his belongings well in order, just like the professionals he admired via satellite television.

“One racket, towel, bottle with water, one banana, a dry extra T-shirt, wrist band and the cap,” Gencic recalled recently. “And I said: ‘O.K., who prepared your bag? Your mother?’ And oh, he was very angry. He said, ‘No, I am playing tennis.”’
I love this article! So funny that he brought all the proper gear in order, cute!
cheriamor is offline View My Blog!  
Old 12-02-2010, 11:04 AM   #3355
country flag Serbia_Foon
Registered User
 
Serbia_Foon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 25
Serbia_Foon is on a distinguished road
Default Re: Novak News!!

Friday's Davis Cup OOP:

1. Gael vs. Janko
2.Gilles vs. Nole
__________________
Serbia...you're always on my mind!
Serbia_Foon is offline View My Blog!  
Old 12-02-2010, 11:10 AM   #3356
country flag Serbia_Foon
Registered User
 
Serbia_Foon's Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2010
Posts: 25
Serbia_Foon is on a distinguished road
Default Re: Novak News!!

Day 2:
Ziki/Viktor vs Llodra/Clement

Day3:
Nole vs Monfils
Janko vs Simon
__________________
Serbia...you're always on my mind!
Serbia_Foon is offline View My Blog!  
Old 12-02-2010, 11:26 AM   #3357
country flag Nole fan
The new era of SuperNovak
 
Nole fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 14,360
Nole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Novak News!!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Serbia_Foon View Post
Day 2:
Ziki/Viktor vs Llodra/Clement

Day3:
Nole vs Monfils
Janko vs Simon
Great! I love the pairings!
Troicky maybe deserved to play singles but given Tipsy's record in DC I find the choice right.

Now, Nole, let's win your two matches please!!! I'd be devastated if he'd somehow failed because it's so important to him. This could give him a big boost of confidence for next season. AJDE!
__________________

Either you get him or you don't.

Novak Djokovic nº1!

The Golden Era of Novak: Australian Open * Dubai * Indian Wells * Miami * Belgrade * Madrid * Rome * Wimbledon * Montreal * US Open * Abu Dhabi * Australian Open * Miami * Toronto * China * Shanghai * World Tour Finals 2012 * Australian Open 2013 * Dubai * Montecarlo * Beijing * Shanghai * Paris * WTF * Indian Wells * Miami * Rome * WIMBLEDON 2014
Federer to Nole: "Amazing year. Amazing tournament. Amazing match. You are THE BEST!"
Nole fan is offline View My Blog!  
Old 12-02-2010, 10:37 PM   #3358
country flag Nole fan
The new era of SuperNovak
 
Nole fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 14,360
Nole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Novak News!!

Nadal and Djokovic will play an exhibition game March 21 in Bogota
By Agencia EFE - 5 hours ago

Bogotá, December 2 (EFE) .- The world number one tennis player, Rafael Nadal in Spanish, said through a video that will be in Colombia on March 21, 2011, the day will play an exhibition game against the number three Serbia’s Novak Djokovic.

__________________

Either you get him or you don't.

Novak Djokovic nº1!

The Golden Era of Novak: Australian Open * Dubai * Indian Wells * Miami * Belgrade * Madrid * Rome * Wimbledon * Montreal * US Open * Abu Dhabi * Australian Open * Miami * Toronto * China * Shanghai * World Tour Finals 2012 * Australian Open 2013 * Dubai * Montecarlo * Beijing * Shanghai * Paris * WTF * Indian Wells * Miami * Rome * WIMBLEDON 2014
Federer to Nole: "Amazing year. Amazing tournament. Amazing match. You are THE BEST!"
Nole fan is offline View My Blog!  
Old 12-02-2010, 10:42 PM   #3359
country flag Nole fan
The new era of SuperNovak
 
Nole fan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 14,360
Nole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond reputeNole fan has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Novak News!!

Djoker's Wild 12/02/2010 - 12:58 PM
By Steve Tignor

Nd What’s my prediction for the Serbia-France Davis Cup final this weekend? The only thing I’m sure of at the moment is noise. Hair-band-level noise. Reporting from the 16,000-seat Belgrade Arena this week, the Times’ Clive White wrote, “It’s debatable which has achieved the greater decibel level [in the arena]: any Davis Cup tie or the recent Guns N Roses concert.”

Still, the captain of Serbia’s opposition, Guy Forget, doesn’t sound all that perturbed. He says the atmosphere will be “warm”—thank you for making “Understatement of the Year” such an easy category in 2010, Guy. “It’s very nice,” Forget added, “it’s wonderful.” Until Friday, that is. As White points out, in his British way, the Serb fans “still have some way to go before fully understanding tennis etiquette.” God, I hope that doesn’t mean free Thunderstix, but I’m guessing it does.

The first two players to face the noise will be Janko Tipsarevic and Gael Monfils. It’s a slight surprise that Tipsarevic, ranked No. 49, holds a 3-2 career edge over the 12th-ranked Monfils, though the last time they played, at the U.S. Open this year, La Monf got him in four sets, two of which went to tiebreakers. If you have an insight into who’s going to win this one, let me know, because it looks like a toss-up to me. Monfils is the superior talent, athlete, and player, but he’s played just four Davis Cup singles matches, winning three of them. Tipsarevic is a DC lifer with a 25-10 career record in 10 years of competition. He’ll obviously have the crowd behind him (in front of him, all around him), and he’ll know this is the chance of a lifetime for his country and a chance at local immortality for him. How he reacts to all of these factors, we shall see. But I would probably go with him in the end; despite his recent Paris performance, and his strong DC showing this year at home, I still don’t trust Monfils in the big moment, against the crowd.

Whichever way it shakes out, that first rubber is going to be big, because Forget has decided to throw Gilles Simon up against the Serbs' anchorman, Novak Djokovic, rather than risk wearing out his doubles ace, Michael Llodra, on a not-as-quick-as-he-would like hard court. Djokovic is 5-1 against Simon, and to say that the Djoker will be fired up for this match, well, that might outdo Forget in the understatement of the year department. Djokovic has borne the pressure of his role well this season, and I don’t see why it would change in the final. Unless . . . unless . . . Monfils were to win the first match, in which case the crowd could prove to be a burden on Djokovic. Instead of feeling their energy, he might start to feel their nerves, the way the Argentine players felt the nerves of their fans a couple years ago in the final against Spain. You want to keep that audience working for you, because they can be a heavy burden to carry if they’re not.

The doubles will be the second crux of the tie, more so than normal because neither of the Sunday singles matches—Djokovic/Monfils, Tipsarevic/Simon—is a sure thing. Troicki-Zimonjic and Clement-Llodra are both strong teams. All four guys have winning doubles records in Davis Cup, and Llodra and Zimonjic would be dubs Hall of Famers if there were a dubs Hall of Fame. A lot depends on the circumstances going into this one. If the Serbs are up 2-0, I’d bet on them to ride the momentum home. If it’s 1-1, the French have a much better shot; at a neutral site, they're probably the better team. If the French do survive to Sunday, which I think they will one way or another, Llodra could become a bigger factor than he seems to be at the moment. Djokovic and Monfils will play first that day; as of now Simon is scheduled to go against Tipsarevic if a fifth match is necessary. That might end up being a relatively rested Llodra instead.

All of which means that the heavy pressure will reside where it should: On the shoulders of the team’s two best singles players. Monfils could very quickly turn the tie in France’s direction with a win in the opening match over Tipsarevic. Whether or not that happens, though, Serbia’s hopes will remain pinned on Djokovic. How he respnds to that should decide the Davis Cup. Three years ago, the U.S.’ hopes rode with Andy Roddick, and he won at home. Two years ago, though, David Nalbandian, Juan Martin del Potro, and the Argentines came unglued under similar circumstances in the Massacre at Mar del Plata. So it can work both ways. Djokovic has embraced the pressure by making Davis Cup the focus of his season. He says it will be the weekend of their lives. That’s a lot to put on yourself, but as I said he’s borne it well so far this season, winning all of his singles matches. However it ends up, seeing Djokovic’s crazy passion, his effort, his emotional highs and lows, his deep breaths and puffed chest, at the center of all that home-crowd noise should go down as one of the highlights of 2010. I'll take it over Guns N Roses anyday.

Serbia: 3-2
__________________

Either you get him or you don't.

Novak Djokovic nº1!

The Golden Era of Novak: Australian Open * Dubai * Indian Wells * Miami * Belgrade * Madrid * Rome * Wimbledon * Montreal * US Open * Abu Dhabi * Australian Open * Miami * Toronto * China * Shanghai * World Tour Finals 2012 * Australian Open 2013 * Dubai * Montecarlo * Beijing * Shanghai * Paris * WTF * Indian Wells * Miami * Rome * WIMBLEDON 2014
Federer to Nole: "Amazing year. Amazing tournament. Amazing match. You are THE BEST!"
Nole fan is offline View My Blog!  
Old 12-02-2010, 11:48 PM   #3360
country flag Amber Spyglass
Registered User
 
Amber Spyglass's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: "I think we are in rats alley,where the dead men lost their bones"
Posts: 2,692
Amber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond reputeAmber Spyglass has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Novak News!!

Oh great, the curse of Tignor once again for what must be the millionth time
Amber Spyglass is offline View My Blog!  
Closed Thread


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


Copyright (C) Verticalscope Inc
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
vBCredits v1.4 Copyright ©2007, PixelFX Studios