Articles & Interviews - Page 3 - MensTennisForums.com

MensTennisForums.com

MenstennisForums.com is the premier Men's Tennis forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.Please Register - It's Free!

Reply

Old 08-22-2005, 07:13 PM   #31
country flag delsa
Registered User
 
delsa's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 5,963
delsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Articles & Interviews

Bit of an article found on the net (New Haven Register...):

PAUL-HENRI MATHIEU: AT HOME ON HARD COURTS

Born and raised in France — home of the premier clay court tournament in the world — it would stand to reason that Paul-Henri Mathieu would save his best tennis for the slow red clay.

Even Mathieu, who gained worldwide attention for his first-round win over Roddick in Montreal earlier this month, chuckles when he looks back on his 2005 season.

He will take an 11-6 record in 2005 on the hard courts into the Pilot Pen. However, his clay court record is only 5-7, with two of those victories at the French Open. But in the two events preceding the French Open, Mathieu lost in the first round.

His results have been significantly more impressive in the weeks leading up the U.S. Open.

In Montreal, Mathieu reached the semifinals before losing a tough straight-set match to eventual champion Nadal. In Cincinnati, he ousted Tommy Haas before being eliminated by Nikolay Davydenko.

"Yes, 10 times better results on hard courts," Mathieu said after his win over Haas. "I think I’m better on the fast surface. But when I am very good physically, I’m good on clay court, too."

Mathieu’s serve, which appears to be getting faster and more effective in each passing week, can be credited for his strong performance during the North American summer hard-court season.

"I have started to serve really good," Mathieu said. "That is the shot I have improved a lot in the last few weeks."


So does this mean he thinks his best surface is HC but his favorite is clay?
delsa is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 

Old 08-22-2005, 07:49 PM   #32
country flag Marine
Registered User
 
Marine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Paris
Posts: 6,073
Marine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Articles & Interviews

Quote:
Originally Posted by delsa
So does this mean he thinks his best surface is HC but his favorite is clay?
Yes probably. Sentimentally clay recalls him Roland Garros so, like many french players he wants to think clay is good. lol
I remember seb's interview in Wimbledon this year, he was asked if Wimbledon was his favorite tournament, he answered "No, I prefer Roland Garros" (even if grass is his best surface)
Marine is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2005, 09:48 PM   #33
country flag marifline
Registered User
 
marifline's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2004
Posts: 1,184
marifline has a reputation beyond reputemarifline has a reputation beyond reputemarifline has a reputation beyond reputemarifline has a reputation beyond reputemarifline has a reputation beyond reputemarifline has a reputation beyond reputemarifline has a reputation beyond reputemarifline has a reputation beyond reputemarifline has a reputation beyond reputemarifline has a reputation beyond reputemarifline has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Articles & Interviews

Quote:
Originally Posted by delsa
Bit of an article found on the net (New Haven Register...):

PAUL-HENRI MATHIEU: AT HOME ON HARD COURTS

Born and raised in France — home of the premier clay court tournament in the world — it would stand to reason that Paul-Henri Mathieu would save his best tennis for the slow red clay.
for journalist french players= claycourters I remember Richard said something against it in a interview..( he was talking about Seb ...)
__________________
Quote:
Originally Posted by jeremda01 View Post
hear we go again 2 bps, only one is needed.
Because sometimes, you just need the obvious to be stated.
marifline is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2005, 10:08 PM   #34
country flag Marine
Registered User
 
Marine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Paris
Posts: 6,073
Marine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Articles & Interviews

noah - 1983 - last french winner - we would know if french players were clay specialists, no ?????

Last edited by Marine : 08-22-2005 at 10:53 PM.
Marine is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2005, 10:22 PM   #35
country flag silverwhite
Registered User
 
silverwhite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Paris
Posts: 55,835
silverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Articles & Interviews

Paulo obviously loves clay, choosing to play all these claycourt tourneys. Stuttgart and Kitzbuhel, instead of Indianapolis and LA. Bucharest and Palmero, instead of Beijing and Bangkok. Or maybe he just prefers to play in Europe.
silverwhite is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2005, 10:24 PM   #36
country flag silverwhite
Registered User
 
silverwhite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Paris
Posts: 55,835
silverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Articles & Interviews

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marine
noah - 1983 - last french winner - we should know if french players were clay specialists, no ?????
They love clay, but it's not always their favourite surface.

Besides, a lot of British players are grasscourt specialists, and yet...
silverwhite is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 08-22-2005, 10:47 PM   #37
country flag *julie*
Registered User
 
*julie*'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 5,471
*julie* has a reputation beyond repute*julie* has a reputation beyond repute*julie* has a reputation beyond repute*julie* has a reputation beyond repute*julie* has a reputation beyond repute*julie* has a reputation beyond repute*julie* has a reputation beyond repute*julie* has a reputation beyond repute*julie* has a reputation beyond repute*julie* has a reputation beyond repute*julie* has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Articles & Interviews

Quote:
Originally Posted by Marine
noah - 1983 - last french winner - we should know if french players were clay specialists, no ?????

So true Marine...


Quote:
Originally Posted by silverwhite
Paulo obviously loves clay, choosing to play all these claycourt tourneys. Stuttgart and Kitzbuhel, instead of Indianapolis and LA. Bucharest and Palmero, instead of Beijing and Bangkok. Or maybe he just prefers to play in Europe.
Thanks for the info Silverwhite.

( my 1000th post )

Last edited by *julie* : 08-23-2005 at 10:34 AM.
*julie* is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2005, 02:47 PM   #38
country flag delsa
Registered User
 
delsa's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 5,963
delsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Articles & Interviews

Congrats on your 1000th post, Julie! I'm almost there, too!

Old interview of PHM still in French but maybe we'll find the time to translate it later. It's from the French Tennis Mag' of January 2005. I think it has already been posted before but not in this recent thread where it should be at least once.

Entretien avec Paul-Henri Mathieu
Tiré du Tennis Magazine de janvier 2005 N°346
Interview de Guy BARBIER et Yannick COCHENNEC


Pour le grand public, le souvenir qui s'attache à Paul-Henri Mathieu demeure sans doute le cinquième match décisif qu'il perdit contre Mikhail Youzhny lors de la finale de coupe Davis France-Russie à Bercy en 2002. Image terriblement réductrice qu'il a magnifiquement corrigée en septembre dernier en dominant Carlos Moya sur la terre battue d'Alicante à l'occasion de la demi-finale contre l'Espagne.
L'histoire de PHM ou de Paulo, comme le surnomment la presse et ses proches, se déroule en fait depuis dix ans sur une ligne brisée par les blessures. Petit génie à l'âge de 14 ans, il n'a cessé ensuite de se battre avec un physique récalcitrant qui lui a encore fait mille misères en 2004 en le privant des six premiers mois de compétition en raison d'un grave problème au poignet gauche. Mais là où d'autres auraient peut-être cédé sous le poids des frustrations et de la douleur morale, Paul-Henri a, lui, opposé son mental d'acier. Son rêve a toujours été de devenir n°1 mondial. Et même s'il se retrouve aujourd'hui autour de la 120ème place, il y croit toujours. Comme il continue de rêver d'un triomphe à Roland Garros. Dans Cette longue confession recueillie alors qu'il s'apprêtait à partir en vacances à l'île Maurice, PHM le timide se livre sans réserve. Et nous fait notamment une drôle de révélation...

----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Depuis votre retour à la compétition après cette longue absence dûe à votre blessure au poignet, on a l'impression que vous vous êtes davantage "ouvert". Vous paraîssez plus gai, plus volubile. Etes-vous d'accord ?
Disons que j'ai appris à relativiser après la dernière blessure qui m'a tenu éloigné des courts pendant six mois. J'essaie de prendre davantage de plaisir sur le court, de mieux profiter du moment. J'attache moins d'importance à certaines frustrations. En résumé, j'ai plus de recul. Et c'est dommage d'avoir dû vivre ce que j'ai vécu pour prendre conscience de ça (sourire).

Compte tenu de cette blessure au poignet survenue en janvier et de cette absence qui s'est prolongée jusqu'en juillet, comment jugez-vous la saison qui vient de se terminer ?
C'est un peu bizarre de dire ça, mais c'est une saison inespérée (sourire). Parce qu'en mai, j'avais vraiment tiré un trait sur les mois à venir. On venait de m'enlever le plâtre, mais lorsque j'ai essayé de frapper des revers, la douleur était toujours là. A ce moment-là, on a songé à l'opération, mais on a finalement opté pour l'attente et un mois de rééducation. Et c'était la bonne solution. A la reprise, en juillet, j'ai eu la chance de gagner ce tournoi challenger à Ségovie. Tout est reparti de là. Ça m'a remis dans le bain aussitôt. Depuis en tout cas, je n'ai plus jamais eu mal. Oui, d'une certaine manière, c'est l'une de mes meilleures saisons.

Rappelez-nous la nature de votre blessure et les étapes de votre convalescence...
Deux jours avant d'entamer ma saison à Chennai, je me suis blessé en frappant un revers à l'entraînement. J'ai senti tout de suite que le poignet gauche avait lâché. Mais j'ai cru à une entorse et c'est la raison pour laquelle je me suis quand même rendu en Australie. Là-bas, la douleur n'a pas disparu, je n'arrivais même plus à faire mes lacets. Je suis donc rentré en France où les examens ont révélé que le tendon était sorti de sa gaine et qu'en plus, un ligament s'était déchiré. Psychologiquement, c'était dur puisque je m'étais déjà battu avec les blessures en 2003. Je n'en sortais décidément pas. En fait, cette blessure est survenue à cause de l'angulation du poignet au moment de la frappe. Mais on a écarté l'hypothèse de l'opération dont le résultat n'était pas garanti. Même si au moment de Roland Garros, quand la douleur est réapparue, j'aurais presque été soulagé d'entendre Bernard Montalvan (le médecin de l'équipe de France de Coupe Davis) me dire : il va falloir opérer.

Dans des moments aussi difficiles que ceux-là, sur qui vous appuyez-vous en priorité ?
Heureusement que mes parents ont été là. Ma copine, Quiterie, a été également très présente à mes côtés. Grâce à elle, je n'étais pas seul tous les jours. J'avais des coups de blues, mais à ses côtés, ils ne duraient pas longtemps. Et il y avait Olivier Soulès, mon entraîneur, avec qui je commençais seulement à travailler quand tout ça est arrivé. On avait entamé notre collaboration fin décembre et dix jours plus tard, c'était la "catastrophe". Mais malgré cette blessure, j'ai continué à m'entraîner puisque je pouvais frapper des coups droits et utiliser mon revers à une main. J'ai également profité de cette période d'inactivité pour faire beaucoup de physique. Je n'en avais d'ailleurs jamais fait autant (sourire). J'ai beaucoup couru, je suis allé en montagne. Endurance, vitesse, tout y est passé, même si je ne pouvais rien faire au niveau du haut du corps.

A l'US Open, vous aviez dit que ce long travail physique, que vous n'auriez pas eu l'occasion de le faire en temps normal, devrait payer un jour ou l'autre...
Je le crois. Ce travail régulier pendant six mois devrait porter ses fruits en 2005. Je sens que j'ai progressé énormément de ce côté-là et les tests que j'effectue sont d'ailleurs là pour le prouver. Par exemple, avant, quand je sautais des haies, mes hanches étaient plutôt raides et mes pieds n'étaient pas très réactifs. Désormais, c'est devenu un jeu d'enfant (sourire). Aujourd'hui, je me sens physiquement plus fort. A la base, mon physique était plutôt pas mal, mais je pouvais tout améliorer. Si l'on excepte le haut du corps, je ne dois pas être loin du maximum de mes capacités.

On se souvient qu'au temps de votre passage dans l'académie de Nick Bollettieri, vous aviez été opéré deux fois du ménisque. On se rappelle notamment de ces photos où l'on vous voyait frapper des balles assis sur une chaise, comme naguère Thomas Muster. Diriez-vous que votre carrière a été marquée jusqu'ici par beaucoup de malchance ?
Oui, ça fait beaucoup de choses. Les deux ménisques chez Bollettieri, les abdominaux en 2003 et le poignet en 2004. Des blessures pas vraiment graves. C'est vrai, il y a une grosse part de malchance dans tout ça. Disons que ça fait partie de la vie d'un sportif de haut niveau. Le plus dur, c'est le sentiment que mon élan a été coupé plusieurs fois. D'abord chez les jeunes avec les deux ménisques quand je faisais partie des tout meilleurs de ma catégorie. Ensuite, chez les pros, en 2003 (il avait manqué l'entame de la saison en raison d'une blessure aux abdominaux), alors que je venais de gagner Moscou et Lyon et même s'il y avait eu le traumatisme de la Coupe Davis. Au moins ai-je eu le mérite de ne pas laisser tomber. Et je pense que je peux revenir encore plus fort. En fait, j'ai toujours voulu arriver au sommet. J'avais un rêve et je m'y suis tenu. Et je m'y tiens encore. Aux États-Unis, quand tous ces problèmes sont arrivés, je me suis vraiment accroché, malgré ma solitude et mes doutes. C'est là-bas que j'ai vraiment appris à souffrir. Mais j'ai envie de dire que ce sont les six derniers mois qui ont été les plus difficiles parce que dans ma vie de pro, j'étais en plein dedans.

Vous êtes Français, vous avez vécu en Floride. Comment comparez-vous les deux modes de vie ?

En France, le système est très bon, mais à un moment donné, il ne me convenait plus et c'est pourquoi je suis parti aux États-Unis qui correspondaient à un rêve. En plus chez Bollettieri qui était la référence. Là-bas, j'ai le sentiment qu'on est plus positif qu'en France. Et puis il y a cette volonté de tous les instants que j'ai réussi à capter en partie.

Pourquoi avoir quitté la France où vous étiez le meilleur et où les structures d'entraînement étaient très compétitives ?
Après trois ans passés au Creps Reims, je suis allé à l'Insep où l'expérience a duré un an. Je ne m'y plaisais pas. J'avais le sentiment d'être noyé dans la masse. Je n'aimais pas l'ambiance. J'avais l'impression d'être passé d'une famille à Reims au village de l'Insep. J'étais perdu, je n'arrivais pas à m'intégrer. Chez Bollettieri, j'ai retrouvé cet esprit de famille. Les entraîneurs étaient plus proches.

Aviez-vous conscience de faire partie des meilleurs ?
Oui, puisqu'à 14 ans, j'avais tout gagné (sourire). J'étais un des meilleurs joueurs du monde dans ma catégorie et ça me mettait en confiance. Si je suis parti aux États-Unis, c'est peut-être pour oublier cette image de "meilleur" que j'avais en France. De toute façon, à 18 ans, mon but n'était pas d'être champion du monde juniors, mais d'être au moins 100ème mondial.

A 14 ans, on ressentait une forme d'assurance chez vous... (En France, Paul-Henri Mathieu est le seul joueur à avoir gagné deux fois le championnat de France minimes, à 13 et 14 ans).
En fait, à cet âge-là, quand j'entrais sur le court, je savais que j'allais gagner. Et je pense que mes adversaires savaient qu'ils allaient perdre. Mais attention, j'étais humble, je ne le montrais pas. Aujourd'hui, j'aimerais vraiment retrouver cette confiance parce que c'était impressionnant (sourire).

Dans ce contexte de "supériorité" comment s'est passé l'apprentissage de la défaite ?Ça a été difficile. Lors de ma première année "cadets", à l'Insep, j'ai un peu faibli à cause du fait que je ne m'y plaisais pas. Il y a eu quelques défaites et deux ou trois personnes ont alors fait des commentaires qui m'ont blessé à l'époque. Je ne les nommerais pas, mais je m'en souviens. Ca m'a fait beaucoup de mal. Sur le court, je me suis mis à penser alors qu'à 14 ans, je ne pensais à rien quand je jouais. Il y avait cette certitude de la victoire.

Cette certitude de la victoire ne revient-elle pas de temps en temps ? Lorque vous affrontez Carlos Moya en demi-finales de la coupe Davis, vous donnez le sentiment de ne pas pouvoir perdre alors que, sur le papier, il y a beaucoup de choses contre vous...
C'est vrai. Même mené deux sets à un, j'étais persuadé que je pouvais gagner. Je ne pensais même pas que je perdais deux sets à un. Quand je gagne coup sur coup à Moscou et Lyon en 2002, je suis un peu dans ce même état d'esprit. Comme à 14 ans, j'ai l'impression que rien ne peut m'arriver.

Vous êtes né en 1982, année très riche avec Andy Roddick, Guillermo Coria, David Nalbandian, Joachim Johansson, Tommy Robredo... Ce dernier était, par exemple, votre grand rival chez les jeunes en Europe. Comment viviez-vous sa progression à l'époque où vous étiez immobilisé chez Bollettieri ?
C'était dur. En fait, je ne comprenais pas trop. Tous ces gens que vous avez cités, je les battais quand j'avais 14 ans. Entre guillemets, je m'amusais presque avec eux. Mais je gardais mes objectifs en tête, même si ça me stressait un peu de voir les résultats des uns et des autres. Je restais persuadé que j'avais toujours en moi un niveau de jeu qui me permettrait un jour de faire la différence. Gagner Roland Garros juniors en 2000 en battant Roddick en quarts de finale et Robredo en finale m'a fait du bien. Pourtant, je ne voulais pas jouer parce que je n'avais disputé aucun tournoi juniors cette année-là. Mais c'est Thierry Champion, mon entraîneur à l'époque, qui m'a poussé à l'inscrire à mon programme. Et il a eu raison : ça m'a redonné confiance. En finale, j'étais mené 6/3, 4-2 mais j'ai fini par gagner parce que je savais que je pouvais le faire.

Vous disiez que le fait de penser sur un court pouvait, d'une certaine manière, tout parasiter. Diriez-vous que c'est ce qui s'est passé lors de votre match contre Mikhail Youzhny en finale de la coupe Davis ou plus récemment au troisième tour de l'US Open contre Sargis Sargsian ?
Dans les deux cas, je mène deux sets zéro et je perds (contre Sargsian, il a eu deux balles de match). Mais en coupe Davis, le contexte était tellement différent. C'est vrai, j'ai eu un peu peur, mais qui n'aurait pas eu peur à ma place ? Franchement, je n'ai pas vraiment "pensé" pendant le match. Si j'avais perdu trois sets à zéro, là, oui, le problème aurait été visible. Mais contre Youzhny, je passe tout de même à deux points de la victoire. A deux points près, les commentaires auraient été complètement différents (sourire).

On vous a beaucoup parlé de cette rencontre. Aujourd'hui, dites-vous : qu'on ne m'en parle plus !
Je suis content d'avoir battu Moya en demi-finales cette année, comme ça, on ne me reparlera plus de 2002. Mais ce match contre Youzhny, ce n'est plus vraiment un problème et ça ne l'a jamais été même si c'était difficile sur le moment. Aujourd'hui, je pourrais regarder sans difficulté la vidéo de la rencontre. Et puis, c'était quand même une chance magnifique : jouer la finale de la Coupe Davis à Bercy devant 15 000 spectateurs.

Quelques mois plus tôt, vous aviez mené deux sets à rien contre Andre Agassi sur le central de Roland Garros. On a le sentiment que vous n'êtes jamais inhibé émotionnellement lors des grandes occasions. Etes-vous d'accord ?
Non, j'aime les gros matches. En fait, quand on est jeune, on rêve de ça. Alors, ça me galvanise. Ce n'est jamais du stress négatif. C'est de l'énergie positive. Et puis je n'ai peur de personne. Quel que soit mon adversaire, je pense que j'ai une chance de gagner.

Y a-t-il un joueur qui vous a inspiré plus que les autres dans votre enfance ?
Boris Becker. Justement parce qu'il donnait le sentiment de n'avoir peur de rien et de personne. Quand il jouait, c'était presque moi qui jouais. Et je souffrais quand il perdait. Tous ses adversaires, les Edberg, les Sampras, c'étaient pour ainsi dire des nuls à côté de Becker (rire). Enfant, mon rêve, c'était d'ailleurs de gagner Wimbledon, pas Roland Garros. Aujourd'hui, les choses ont changé. Roland Garros vient avant tous les autres tournois. Mais Becker, pour moi, c'était vraiment la référence depuis l'âge de cinq ans. Le plus bizarre, c'est que je ne joue pas du tout comme lui. Il était mon modèle, mais techniquement, je ne m'en suis pas du tout inspiré. J'ai seulement hérité de sa volonté (sourire).

L'avez-vous déjà vu et rencontré ?
Je l'ai vu une fois "en vrai" à Genève lors d'une exhibition. Mais non, je ne lui ai jamais parlé (sourire).

Si vous aviez dix ans aujourd'hui, qui admireriez-vous ?

(longue réflexion) Je ne pense pas que ce serait Federer parce que trouve qu'il "dégage" moins que Sampras. (silence) Ce serait peut-être Safin.

Pas Roddick, un joueur né comme vous en 1982 ?
Non. En fait, je ne l'aime pas vraiment (sourire).

C'est dû à quoi ?
Il y a son comportement, cette volonté de s'imposer, de ne pas se laisser marcher dessus. Et puis, c'est vrai, c'est le n°1 des 82 (sourire). Et d'ailleurs, parmi les 82, je n'aime pas non plus Robredo (rire). Coria, ce n'est pas terrible non plus, mais je m'entends bien avec Nalbandian. Mais c'est normal : il y aura toujours cette rivalité entre nous.

En quoi Olivier Soulès, votre entraîneur, est-il différent de Thierry Champion qui s'était occupé de vous auparavant ?
C'est encore un peu difficile à dire parce que notre expérience commune sur le circuit est encore trop courte à cause de la blessure. Avec lui, on essaye de faire évoluer mon jeu vers l'avant.

Et comment comptez-vous faire évoluer votre jeu ?
Il y a deux objectifs : venir davantage au filet et progresser au service.

On vous reproche parfois d'être un peu passif sur le court. Trouvez-vous la critique justifiée ?
Oui, sur quelques parties de match. Contre Sargsian à l'US Open, je manque peut-être d'audace en certaines occasions. C'est général : je dois prendre davantage ma chance. En Espagne, je l'ai prise contre Moya et j'ai gagné. Je suis resté accroché à ma ligne de fond de court . J'ai refusé de reculer dans les moments cruciaux.

Vous disiez que vous avez frappé des revers à une main lors de votre convalescence. Mais en match, depuis, on ne vous a jamais vu temporiser ou casser le rythme avec un revers slicé à une main. Pourquoi ?
Je peux en faire en coup de défense, mais pour casser le rythme, non, ce n'est vraiment pas mon jeu. Moi, mon but, c'est de faire craquer l'autre, de lui faire mal.

Faire craquer l'autre, c'est donc un système de jeu. Mais n'est-il pas épuisant ?
Physiquement, je sais que je suis fort, notamment sur terre battue. Et je l'ai montré contre Moya.

Moya, c'est donc le match référence...
Oui, parce qu'il venait après toutes ces galères et parce que ça arrivait en Coupe Davis. Après, jusqu'à la fin de la saison, j'ai d'ailleurs eu du mal à retrouver de l'énergie. C'était un défi énorme et ça m'a un peu "pompé". Je reviens de loin, mais d'une certaine manière, je suis plus fort que jamais. Il n'y a qu'à regarder Guillermo Cañas qui, malgré toutes les blessures qu'il a traversées, est là où il est aujourd'hui. Je suis comme lui.

Sur le court, vous êtes un bagarreur. L'êtes-vous dans tous les domaines ?
C'est sûr : si je joue à un jeu, je veux gagner. A la Playstation, pas question de perdre (sourire) !

Aujourd'hui, visez-vous la place de n°1 mondial comme lorsque vous étiez enfant ?
C'était mon rêve, mais c'est aussi celui de beaucoup de monde. Et j'espère qu'un jour, j'y serai. Être n°1 m'obsédera toujours. C'est comme Roland Garros. Et puis, je vois tous ces gars de 82 comme Roddick, Coria et Nalbandian qui occupent les premières places mondiales. Alors, je me dis : pourquoi pas moi ? Mais la confiance, ça ne s'explique pas. Peut-être que je vais gagner l'Open d'Australie en janvier et qu'après tout s'enchaînera.

En fait, vous donneriez cher pour retrouver la confiance de vos 14 ans...
C'est un peu ça. Retrouver cette innocence... Là, il y a tant d'enjeux autour qu'on pense à tellement de choses à la fois.

Vous avez ouvertement évoqué votre travail avec une psychologue, Elisabeth Rosnet, qui vous suit depuis le Creps de Reims. Continuez-vous cette collaboration ?
Oui, parce que ça me fait du bien depuis que j'ai 14 ans. Je la contacte régulièrement, par téléphone quand je suis en compétition. J'en ai besoin, vraiment.

Donnez-vous facilement votre confiance ?
J'hésite beaucoup. Parce que j'ai été souvent déçu. Des gens qui vous encouragent et qui vous laissent tomber. On s'en aperçoit particulièrement quand on est blessé. L'année dernière, par exemple, on attendait beaucoup de moi et dans la presse, les commentaires étaient parfois un peu trop durs. Et à l'US Open, j'ai craqué devant les journalistes. La première question, c'était du genre : alors encore une défaite au premier tour d'un Grand Chelem ? Je n'ai pas supporté et je me suis défendu parce que ce n'était pas la première fois. Aujourd'hui, j'ai davantage de recul parce que lis moins la presse. Et on m'aborde différemment. Mais je sais que demain, si je joue mal, je peux encore me faire "tailler".

Donnez-vous cette même confiance aux autres membres de l'équipe de France de coupe Davis ?
Oui, parce que le groupe est solidaire. Lorsque je suis arrivé dans l'équipe en 2002, lors de la demi-finale contre les États-Unis, j'ai été tout de suite adopté.

Après la finale contre la Russie, où l'on a vu l'équipe de France faire corps autour de vous alors que vous veniez de perdre contre Mikhail Youzhny, avez-vous reçu le même soutien des joueurs lorsque vous étiez blessé ? Vous ont-ils appelé ?
(long silence) Deux-trois, pas tout le monde. Moins que j'aurais pu espérer. Mais quand vous êtes blessé, on vous oublie forcément un peu. Je n'ai pas envie de donner des noms, mais ils auraient sans doute pu être plus nombreux à me contacter (sourire). Si, il y a quelqu'un que je veux nommer. C'est Arnaud Di Pasquale qui a régulièrement pris de mes nouvelles. Mais il comprenait ma situation dans la mesure où lui aussi a connu de longues galères.

La particularité de cette équipe de France, c'est que c'est une équipe sans leader puisque Sébastien Grosjean refuse ce rôle qu'il laisse volontiers au capitaine...
Si Sébastien était n°2 mondial, j'ai même le sentiment qu'il ne voudrait pas endosser ce rôle-là. On essaie de former un groupe, comme en Espagne où, semble-t-il, il n'y a aucune tête qui dépasse. Mais il y a des animateurs, le premier d'entre eux étant Nicolas Escudé qui a vraiment cet état d'esprit en lui et qui sait mettre de l'ambiance.

Vous l'avez dit : Roland Garros est votre priorité n°1. Quelle difficulté représente ce tournoi à vos yeux ?
Des quatre tournois du Grand Chelem, c'est, selon moi, le plus dur à gagner. Physiquement, il faut être un roc. Si vous commencez la quinzaine avec deux matches en cinq sets dans les pattes, vous savez déjà que vous avez dilapidé une grande partie de vos forces. Mais j'ai la chance de ne pas être bloqué mentalement par l'événement. Je l'ai montré en 2002. Il reste que si je gagnais Roland Garros, ce serait comme remporter deux fois l'Open d'Australie. Attention : ce n'est pas une obsession. C'est un objectif majeur.

Votre capacité à rêver à des grands titres est-elle aussi grande qu'à l'époque de vos 14 ans ?
Oui, même si je rêvais sans doute d'être 5ème mondial à 18 ans, comme Becker. Aujourd'hui, je ne me bats pas pour être 30ème. Mes rêves sont intacts : titres du Grand Chelem, classement le plus élevé possible.

Goûtez-vous la notoriété ? Après la demi-finale de coupe Davis contre l'Espagne, on vous a notamment vu dans l'émission de Laurent Ruquier...
Oh ça, ce n'était pas terrible (rire). Mon "boom" remonte en fait à la fin 2002 quand j'ai gagné mes deux tournois et joué la finale de la coupe Davis. C'est là où tout s'est un peu agité autour de moi, où je me suis retrouvé dans Paris-Match. Mais c'est sympa la notoriété. C'est agréable d'entendre derrière soi : oh, regarde, c'est Paul-Henri Mathieu. Mais si je me montre dans des émissions télé comme chez Ruquier, je ne le fais pas pour moi. Je le fais pour qu'on parle davantage du tennis parce que je trouve que c'est un sport qui, médiatiquement, est en baisse. Ruquier, je l'ai fait pour la France, pour le tennis français. Je veux transmettre des messages.

C'est-à-dire ?
Je veux qu'on comprenne ce qu'est la vie d'un joueur professionnel. Moi, par exemple, je prends des notes plus ou moins régulièrement. J'écris sur mon ordinateur. En fait, je cherche à exprimer mes émotions. Ça me fait du bien, c'est comme si je parlais à Elisabeth. Parfois, je me relis et je trouve ça pas mal (sourire). Je revois par quoi je suis passé notamment lorsque j'étais blessé. J'ai toujours écrit depuis que je suis tout petit.

Quelqu'un a-t-il déjà lu ce que vous avez écrit ?
Non, vous êtes d'ailleurs les premières personnes à qui j'en parle. Mais j'aime vraiment écrire, même si c'est difficile quand il faut traduire une émotion. Dix minutes par-ci par-là dans les chambres d'hôtel. Quand Yannick Noah m'avait dédicacé son livre (Secret(s), co-écrit par Yannick Noah et Dominique Bonnot), il avait écrit : "J'espère qu'un jour, je lirai ton livre." Et j'aimerais que ça se réalise, en effet.

Vous destinez donc vos travaux d'écriture à la publication ?
Pourquoi pas ? Ce serait bien après avoir gagné Roland Garros... Pour montrer tout le chemin parcouru et les hauts et les bas qui l'accompagnent (sourire).


Last edited by delsa : 08-23-2005 at 11:00 PM.
delsa is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2005, 03:00 PM   #39
country flag delsa
Registered User
 
delsa's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2005
Posts: 5,963
delsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond reputedelsa has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Articles & Interviews

Old article from 2002 (Tennis Mag' of december 2002)...Paulo seen by his mother... hehe
There are a lot of infos about the Bollettieri experience, the injuries etc... Soon to be translated...

That's interesting. From what she narrates, basically she's what the French call a "mère poule": very attached to her children and even more to Paulo who's the younger of the three... But Paulo is apparently not a mummy's and daddy's boy at all and almost "flee" them wanting to leave home at a very early age. First leaving for one of the "CREPS" (Centre Regional d'Education Physique et Sportive) in Reims (far from his Strasbourg home, i can tell you...) and then crossing the Atlantic to go in Bollettieri's. And he asked them not to get involved in his tennis career at all saying it bothered him. Maybe he "sufocated" a little bit in their company. don't know... "Too much overwhelming love and support kills love and support..." And she's the kind to be anxious too on top of that from how she describes herself = not good vibes for a young pro tennis player who doesn't need extra pressure on his shoulder... I would have "flee" too if i were in his situation with this kind of mother... (mine used to be a very little bit too much like that with me and we had to sort this out...) She said it was hard for her and she had to put herself in question and change her behaviour etc...and bla bla bla and then she explained how it was like for him there in Bollettieri's (that's when it gets interesting...) etc...Apart from that they have very good relationships and he called them almost every day (don't know if it's still the case today...) and he cares for their opinion and advice a lot on everything outside tennis, even too much, she hinted.

On this pic from his victory in Lyon in 2002 the ones huging near Thiérry Champion (the one congratulating Mathieu...) who coached him at the time, are his mother Yveline and his father Patrick. Behind them, the man with the blue shirt is his brother Pierre-Yves and the blonde girl with the beige pull-over next to him is his sister Aude among some other family members i guess (maybe brother-in-law, sister-in-law, cousins, friends, i don't know...). Thiérry Tulasne, his actual coach, already bald, was already around at the time it seems (in the back...)...hehe



Paul-Henri Mathieu vu par sa maman, Yveline
Tiré du "Tennis magazine" de décembre 2002


"Comme toutes les mamans, je suis anxieuse pour mon fils, mais j'apprécie les moments où j'ai l'occasion de le voir directement sur le court même si ça se manifeste par de la moiteur au niveau des mains ou des palpitations cardiaques (sourire). Je préfère cette situation à celle qui consiste à se retrouver devant un ordinateur pour suivre l'évolution du score de Paul-Henri sur internet. Parce que mon mari et moi suivons pratiquement toutes ses rencontres par ce biais-là et peu importe l'heure (sourire). Là, le stress est important parce qu'on ne voit pas ce qui se passe. Récemment, au cœur de la nuit, on a ainsi "assisté" à sa victoire sur Sampras à Long Island. Mais de toutes les façons, quand ça se passe bien, Paul-Henri a pris l'habitude de nous appeler quelle que soit l'heure. Ces derniers temps, il nous contacte moins lorsque ça ne s'est pas bien déroulé. Il nous laisse déduire qu'il a perdu."

"Il y a quelque temps, il nous a demandé de nous dispenser de tout commentaire sur son tennis. Quand il nous appelle, il nous donne le résultat sec et s'il veut bien, il rajoute "J'ai bien joué" ou "Je suis content", mais ça se limite à ça. Une fois pour toutes, il a décidé que mon mari et moi n'étions pas compétents pour juger sa technique ou son niveau de jeu, ce qui est d'ailleurs vrai. C'est une décision qu'il nous a forcés à prendre. Un jour, il nous a dit de ne plus nous mêler de son tennis. Il pensait que nous avions des attitudes qui lui étaient néfastes, que nous étions trop près de lui. Nous n'avions pas du tout ce sentiment parce qu'on ne faisait que répondre à ses demandes. On n'allait jamais au-devant. Mais il le ressentait différemment et il avait sans doute de bonnes raisons pour cela. Il ne m'interroge jamais pour savoir comment je l'ai trouvé sur le court. Il peut me dire "J'ai fait un bon match", mais il ne me demandera jamais si je suis contente de sa performance. Sur le court, il ne me regarde pas. Son regard, c'est pour Thierry Champion, son entraîneur."

"C'était un petit garçon très joyeux, très farceur, très vif, très pétillant, mais il a perdu un peu de cette spontanéité à partir du moment où il a fait beaucoup de compétition. Jusqu'à 11 ans, c'était un "bébé cadeau", comme je l'appelais toujours, parce qu'il était en permanence de bonne humeur. Puis il a découvert l'anxiété liée aux matches, ce qu'on attendait de lui et peut-être qu'on lui a demandé beaucoup de choses trop tôt. Il s'est donc renfermé. Le comprendre a été difficile. Une coupure s'est probablement produite quand il a quitté le domicile familial pour aller au tennis-études de Reims. Il vivait des choses qu'on ne connaissait pas et dont il n'avait pas envie de parler. Peut-être le pressait-on trop de questions et a-t-on outrepassé nos droits. A partir de là, il y a une certaine distance qui s'est créée, même s'il ne s'est pas complètement détaché. Aujourd'hui encore, il nous appelle tous les jours."

"Son départ de la maison a été très difficile à vivre pour moi. Il est le plus jeune de mes trois enfants. Il était le petit dernier que j'avais envie de chouchouter (sourire). Mais c'est lui qui a pris la décision de partir. Je me souviens être allée voir le directeur du collège où il était. Cette personne m'avait dit : s'il vous répond "Oui, mais", alors il n'est pas prêt ; s'il vous répond "Oui, maman, je pars", alors ne contrariez pas sa volonté. Comme Paul-Henri m'a répondu trois fois oui, je me suis pliée à son désir. Et tout s'est très bien passé à Reims. Après, il est parti aux Etats-Unis, dans l'académie de Nick Bollettieri, et là, j'ai vécu un enfer. Quand il n'était pas bien, c'était terrible. Plusieurs fois, j'ai pris l'avion pour le rejoindre, mais ça n'était pas toujours possible parce qu'il y avait deux autres enfants à la maison. Il ne m'a jamais dit "Viens", sauf une fois. Heureusement, il avait rencontré des Français avec qui nous nous étions liés d'amitié et ces gens-là tiraient la sonnette d'alarme dans les moments difficiles : "Venez, il n'est pas bien.""

"Le plus cruel là-bas a été pour lui la blessure, particulièrement la seconde. Il est tout de même resté sans jouer pendant 14 mois. Il a vu ceux qu'il battait progresser et avancer à l'ATP et quand il a recommencé à jouer, il a voulu rattraper le temps perdu et il ne comprenait pas que les résultats ne viennent pas aussitôt. Il perdait et il lui arrivait de pleurer au téléphone. Il a connu ces moments de détresse jusqu'à l'année dernière où il avait le sentiment de bien travailler à l'entraînement, mais de ne pas être suffisamment récompensé de ses efforts. Oui, c'est un perfectionniste depuis toujours. Quand il était petit, il ne quittait jamais un court sans avoir fait un point gagnant. L'entraînement ne pouvait pas s'arrêter sur un point perdu."

"Il a franchi un cap depuis le dernier Roland Garros quand il a atteint les huitièmes de finale face à Agassi. Peut-être a-t-il appris ce jour-là à relativiser la défaite. Quand je l'ai revu tout de suite après le match, il était sous le choc de l'échec. Tout le monde lui disait pourtant : "Tu as fait un super match". Je me rappelle notamment de la maman de Tatiana Golovin qui lui a déclaré : "Aujourd'hui, Paul-Henri, c'est ta plus belle victoire." Il l'a regardée avec stupéfaction. Je crois qu'il a compris cet après-midi là que l'on pouvait perdre un match même en ayant très bien joué. Eh oui, je pense que depuis, il gère mieux l'échec ou l'idée de l'échec. Il faut se souvenir que jusqu'à sa première blessure, il jouait en pensant que rien ne pouvait lui arriver. Il était toujours en pleine confiance et dominateur. Il a découvert la défaite assez tard. C'est une caractéristique importante de son parcours."

"Plus jeune, il était assez fétichiste. S'il n'avait pas le bon maillot, il ne pouvait pas jouer. Je me rappelle qu'il pouvait me dire : "Ca ne peut pas marcher, tu ne m'as pas lavé le maillot qui gagne". Je me souviens du quart de finale qu'il avait disputé contre Andy Roddick lors du tournoi juniors de Roland Garros en 2000. Nous étions logés chez des amis à Paris. Cinq minutes avant d'entrer sur le court, Paul-Henri arrive en courant vers moi pour me dire : "Je n'ai pas la bonne tenue". La personne chez qui nous habitions a repris sa moto pour aller chercher la fameuse tenue que nous lui avons donnée alors que le match avait déjà commencé. Il l'a enfilée aussitôt et il a battu Roddick puis gagné le tournoi."

"S'il nous tient éloignés de tout ce qui concerne son jeu, il nous demande notre avis pour tout un tas d'autres choses liées à sa carrière ou à sa vie de tous les jours. Par exemple, il ne s'autorise pas à s'acheter un walkman sans éprouver le besoin de nous en parler. Il est huitième de finaliste à Roland Garros. Dix jours après, il téléphone à la maison : "Papa, est-ce que je peux m'acheter un baladeur?"

"Ce que j'aime lorsque je le vois jouer? J'adore l'entendre ahaner sur un court (sourire). Quand il ahane au moment de la frappe, et bien que cela dérange un certain nombre de gens, cela me prouve qu'il est bien concentré. Il faisait déjà ça quand il était tout petit, mais certaines personnes lui ont demandé d'arrêter et il lui a fallu beaucoup de self control pour y parvenir. Et ce cri est revenu quand il s'est remis à gagner l'année dernière (sourire). S'il n'ahane pas, je me dis que ce n'est pas un bon jour. Quand il se parle à lui-même, quand il maugrée, je sais que ça ne va pas. Petit, il avait tendance à montrer fréquemment le poing face à son adversaire. On lui a dit que ça n'était pas une bonne idée et il a eu du mal à l'accepter (sourire). Aujourd'hui, il montre le poing, mais c'est pour s'encourager. C'est un signe positif supplémentaire pour dire "Je suis là"."

Last edited by delsa : 08-23-2005 at 11:19 PM.
delsa is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2005, 03:39 PM   #40
country flag Marine
Registered User
 
Marine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Paris
Posts: 6,073
Marine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Articles & Interviews

Thanks delsa. I already read these articles bit it's always goot to read them again.

Paulo seems have been brought up by his over cautious mother
Marine is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2005, 03:49 PM   #41
country flag Marine
Registered User
 
Marine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Paris
Posts: 6,073
Marine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Articles & Interviews

Quote:
Originally Posted by delsa
Si vous aviez dix ans aujourd'hui, qui admireriez-vous ?[/b]
(longue réflexion) Je ne pense pas que ce serait Federer parce que trouve qu'il "dégage" moins que Sampras. (silence) Ce serait peut-être Safin.
Good guy I like Fed but Sampras is unique


Quote:
Originally Posted by delsa
Pas Roddick, un joueur né comme vous en 1982 ?
Non. En fait, je ne l'aime pas vraiment (sourire).

C'est dû à quoi ?
Il y a son comportement, cette volonté de s'imposer, de ne pas se laisser marcher dessus. Et puis, c'est vrai, c'est le n°1 des 82 (sourire). Et d'ailleurs, parmi les 82, je n'aime pas non plus Robredo (rire). Coria, ce n'est pas terrible non plus, mais je m'entends bien avec Nalbandian. Mais c'est normal : il y aura toujours cette rivalité entre nous.
ooohh Paulo !!!


Quote:
Originally Posted by delsa
J'écris sur mon ordinateur. En fait, je cherche à exprimer mes émotions. Parfois, je me relis et je trouve ça pas mal (sourire). J'ai toujours écrit depuis que je suis tout petit.

Quelqu'un a-t-il déjà lu ce que vous avez écrit ?
Non, vous êtes d'ailleurs les premières personnes à qui j'en parle. Mais j'aime vraiment écrire, même si c'est difficile quand il faut traduire une émotion. Dix minutes par-ci par-là dans les chambres d'hôtel.

Vous destinez donc vos travaux d'écriture à la publication ?
Pourquoi pas ? Ce serait bien après avoir gagné Roland Garros... Pour montrer tout le chemin parcouru et les hauts et les bas qui l'accompagnent (sourire).
Arghhhh Paulo loves writing, interesting !!!
Marine is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2005, 05:22 PM   #42
country flag parissima
Registered User
 
parissima's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2005
Location: London
Age: 27
Posts: 2,329
parissima has a reputation beyond reputeparissima has a reputation beyond reputeparissima has a reputation beyond reputeparissima has a reputation beyond reputeparissima has a reputation beyond reputeparissima has a reputation beyond reputeparissima has a reputation beyond reputeparissima has a reputation beyond reputeparissima has a reputation beyond reputeparissima has a reputation beyond reputeparissima has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Articles & Interviews

Ohm thanks for the interview and the article delsa...
it's interesting, we get to know a lil bit more about Paulo ( i didn't buy tennis mags until like two or three months ago so i missed all the good articles)
parissima is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2005, 05:41 PM   #43
country flag *julie*
Registered User
 
*julie*'s Avatar
 
Join Date: Sep 2004
Posts: 5,471
*julie* has a reputation beyond repute*julie* has a reputation beyond repute*julie* has a reputation beyond repute*julie* has a reputation beyond repute*julie* has a reputation beyond repute*julie* has a reputation beyond repute*julie* has a reputation beyond repute*julie* has a reputation beyond repute*julie* has a reputation beyond repute*julie* has a reputation beyond repute*julie* has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Articles & Interviews

I had already read them but it's good to remind them.
When the journalist talks about a revelation from Paulo, I wonder which one they are talking about... they are so many revelations in the article!
Like the confidence he had when he was younger, the players he doesn't really appreciate, the fact he didn't receive any support from some french players when he was injured or when he says that he likes writing and would like to write a book later etc...

This interview is great. Thank you for posting...

And as for the interview of his mother it's so funny to think about his parents following the scoreboard late at night... like I usually do
*julie* is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2005, 05:48 PM   #44
country flag Marine
Registered User
 
Marine's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2003
Location: Paris
Posts: 6,073
Marine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond reputeMarine has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Articles & Interviews

Quote:
Originally Posted by *julie*
And as for the interview of his mother it's so funny to think about his parents following the scoreboard late at night... like I usually do
Me too...we should invite his mother on msn to follow with us ! lol
Marine is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 08-23-2005, 05:49 PM   #45
country flag silverwhite
Registered User
 
silverwhite's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2003
Location: Paris
Posts: 55,835
silverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond reputesilverwhite has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: Articles & Interviews

I didn't have the energy to read the whole chunk but the parts Marine quoted were really interesting. If Paulo publishes his writings, we will finally be able to figure out his mentality (didn't Delsa mention something about going inside his brain earlier in the year? ).
silverwhite is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


Copyright (C) Verticalscope Inc
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
vBCredits v1.4 Copyright ©2007, PixelFX Studios