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Old 09-24-2005, 10:36 AM   #16
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Default Re: ~~The "Young Hopes" Thread~~

Well Sidorenko and Spencer lost 7/6(4) 6/4 to JUNAID / MARX in Semifinal but it's not too bad.

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Old 09-29-2005, 07:54 AM   #17
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Default Re: ~~The "Young Hopes" Thread~~

I will soon make a post about Stéphane Piro, Kévin Botti, and Inzé playing in the Junior DC taking place right now in Barcelona and about Alex Sidorenko winning a few matches...
Plus about the others maybe too.

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Old 10-02-2005, 06:11 PM   #18
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Default Re: ~~The "Young Hopes" Thread~~

They did it. This golden group won the Junior Davis Cup today (the French girls were the runner-ups in the Fed Cup Jr against Poland in the final...Well done very talented promising Polish sisters! I hope Nathaliia is happy about this...). This doesn't mean anything since it's junior level and everything is different after. But that's still great. And it's the story of a great "aventure" of three/four boys and their coach, of a bunch of friends... to make it sirupy, so...that's bigger than tennis and even if you don't care about junior tennis or promising young French players or even tennis that's still cool.
(i'm good at hyping things up when they're pretty much insignifiant, no?... )

Here's first an article from the ITF site about it then i'll try to do better...

Quote:
France and Poland Score Cup Success
02 Oct 2005 - Barcelona - Eleanor Preston

France are champions of the 2005 Junior Davis Cup by BNP Paribas and Poland are winners of the 2005 Junior Fed Cup after both teams scored gritty wins on a gripping final day of competition at Barcelona’s Polo Club.

Poland’s sister act of Urszula and Agnieszka Radwanska won both singles rubbers in a tight final with France, beating Estelle Guisard and Alizé Cornet to notch up a first Junior Fed Cup trophy for their country.

France needed two tough three-setters to get past the Czech Republic in an equally tense encounter, with Jérôme Inzerillo and Kévin Botti both coming from a set down to beat Roman Jebavy and Michael Konecny. The French players, who were top seeds in Barcelona, also won the European Winter Cup under-16 competition and are unbeaten as a team this year.

“I’m so proud of my players,” said team captain Aloïs Beust after celebrating with his delighted squad on court. They’ve played very well. It’s been a very, very long road and this is an incredibly tough competition, very long and lots of hours on court. This team has a wonderful spirit because they’ve played together all year, they’ve been through a lot together and they’ve become good friends. That’s what is so great about these competitions – it allows them to form strong bonds with each other. It paid off today.”

Beust must have wondered if his team’s unbeaten run was coming to an end when Inzerillo went a break down in the first set against Jebavy. Inzerillo hit back though and the Czech, who received treatment for a stomach injury mid-way through the second set, faded to give France a 57 64 61 win and a 1-0 lead in the tie.

The pressure was on France again when Botti dropped the first set in what was a compelling match against Konecny but French resilience came through once more for Botti to come back to win 46 63 62. He threw his racket in the air in joyful celebration before being engulfed by his captain and team-mates, as well as the French girls’ team.

“We’ve played the Czechs twice this year and they are very, very good fighters,” said Beust. “This is the first time in all our matches against them that it hasn’t gone down to the doubles.”

The matches were nearly as close in Poland’s win over France in the Junior Fed Cup final, though both Radwanska sisters managed to win in straight sets. Urszula beat Guisard 62 61, while Agnieszka, the reigning girls’ Wimbledon champion, battled hard to beat Cornet 76 63.

“That was definitely her toughest match since she won Wimbledon,” said team captain – and the girls’ father – Robert Radwanska. “Cornet played very well and she’s a very good player. Agnieszka had to save a set-point in the first set and that was definitely a massive point. The girls’ mum and I are really proud of them both.”

The sisters, along with team-mate Maksymiliana Wandel, celebrated their victory in unique style - by donning Barcelona soccer shirts and buying themselves an ice-cream!

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Old 10-02-2005, 06:28 PM   #19
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Default Re: ~~The "Young Hopes" Thread~~

Now some pics from the ITF site's gallery again...
1-Kévin Botti
2-Jérôme Inzerillo
3-Inzé again
4-The boys' team
5-The boys' and girls' teams (what were the girls doing here? :retard: )
6-If you look very closely , you'll see Stéphane Piro's face between the girls' team's coach one and Aloïs' and behind the French queue there is Botti...(maybe you'll need a lens...LOL)
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Botti DC 2005.jpg (21.9 KB, 11 views)
File Type: jpg GalleryITFJnrDC1.jpg (21.7 KB, 18 views)
File Type: jpg GalleryITF JnrDC2.jpg (20.4 KB, 12 views)
File Type: jpg French team.jpg (23.7 KB, 10 views)
File Type: jpg French boys and girls team.jpg (26.7 KB, 17 views)
File Type: jpg team juniors FC et DC 2005.jpg (36.2 KB, 21 views)

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Old 10-02-2005, 08:56 PM   #20
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Default Re: ~~The "Young Hopes" Thread~~

Another article and another last photo from the ITF site's juniors section again:

Quote:
France and Poland Win Silverware But Teamwork Triumphs in Barcelona
02 Oct 2005 - Barcelona - Eleanor Preston

France and Poland took the honours after a gruelling week of competition at the Junior Davis Cup by BNP Paribas and the Junior Fed Cup finals at the Polo Club in Barcelona but the ITF’s premier junior team competition was about more than just trophies.

Both under-16 competitions are designed to promote the team ethos and help players learn the benefits of playing together with a common goal – the very thing that make the fully-fledged versions of Davis Cup by BNP Paribas and Fed Cup so compelling for players and fans alike.

France’s victory over the Czech Republic in the Junior Davis Cup final was a case in point, for it was borne from a strong collective will, fostered under team captain Aloïs Beust. During both singles matches – won by Jérôme Inzerillo and Kévin Botti respectively – the air around the Polo Club’s centre court was filled with French voices cheering on their team-mates. No-one who watched the collective embrace once Botti had beaten Michael Konecny to take the vital second singles rubber would have doubted what the competition meant to all of those who travelled to Barcelona.

Poland’s victorious Junior Fed Cup team had a unique spirit due to the fact that both key players and the team captain all came from the same family. Sisters Agnieszka (elder) and Urszula Radwanska won the crucial two singles points while their father and captain Robert Radwanski looked on. Their mother, Marta, was forced to bite her nails in the stands, alongside third player Maksymiliana Wandel.

“It’s fun to be in a team with your sister but sometimes it’s hard too,” admitted Urszula, whose sister Agnieszka also happens to be the reigning girls’ Wimbledon champion. “Sometimes we fight; sometimes we are friends. That’s the way it is with sisters. I think it’s very hard for our mum to watch, especially as our dad is often a bit nervous! I think it’s hard for him to be a dad and a captain at the same time.”

The formats of both competitions, which begin with four round robin ties apiece before moving into the semi-finals and play-off phases, means every team has something to play for right up until the last day and there are incentives on offer even for those who don’t win the silverware.

Teams that finished in the top three of Junior Davis Cup (France, Czech Republic and Ecuador) and Junior Fed Cup (Poland, France and Czech Republic) received 16-and-under team competition feed-up exempt positions for their players - effectively a free pass into junior tournaments next season.

There was lots of motivation for those battling for the lower placings too. Thailand finished in the 16th and final position of the Junior Davis Cup and therefore Asia will have one less place in the qualifying rounds for the 2006 competition. South Africa’s finish in 16th spot in the Junior Fed Cup means Africa will lose a qualifying place for that competition in 2006.

Even those players who left Barcelona without the feeling the triumph enjoyed by the victors at least had the consolation of a week full of gruelling but fascinating matches and having experienced the thrill and passion of international team competition.
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File Type: jpg Team and coach Aloïs.jpg (30.7 KB, 16 views)
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Old 10-12-2005, 10:35 PM   #21
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Default Re: ~~The "Young Hopes" Thread~~

Scans of a small article on the Junior DC and FC in the November 2005 issue of Fr Tennis Mag'.

Article TM Jr DC and FC 1
Article TM Jr DC and FD 2
Fr Jr DC and FC Teams Pic
Fr Jr DC Team Pic

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Old 10-13-2005, 05:11 PM   #22
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Default Re: ~~The "Young Hopes" Thread~~

Thanks for all the good work Delsa
I also read in Tennis Mag that Jérôme Inzerillo and Alizé Cornet have joined the "team Lagardere" in a structure for the juniors in Nice (Sophia Antipolis). That's impressive... Soon, french players will no longer need the FFT...
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Old 10-22-2005, 05:24 PM   #23
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Default Re: ~~The "Young Hopes" Thread~~

Quote:
Originally Posted by *julie*
Thanks for all the good work Delsa
I also read in Tennis Mag that Jérôme Inzerillo and Alizé Cornet have joined the "team Lagardere" in a structure for the juniors in Nice (Sophia Antipolis). That's impressive... Soon, french players will no longer need the FFT...

You're welcome Julie.
Sorry if i didn't answer you later but, first, i didn't really have the time latelyand ,second, before that i took the time to enjoy the fact that somebody else than me had posted in this thread...

Where in Tennis Mag' could it be read?
Isn't it a bit concerning rather than impressive actually? What's the goal of this Lagardère guy?
I've read many things about this but i still don't get how there wouldn't be some kind of competition/rivalry between him, "his project" (which is? btw) and the fft.
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Old 10-22-2005, 05:36 PM   #24
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Default Re: ~~The "Young Hopes" Thread~~

Here's an article from Tennis Week (an American? magazine about tennis) that i found on Rg.net but it was taken from another board apparently.
Anyway it's an interesting read. It has the great quality of explaining many things about the French development program (even if there are some false stuff and some things missed...) and of already be in English! That way we won't need to explain everything and moreover in English which is even more difficult!
Some corrections will be enough.

They don't speak enough about it's many defaults/weak points. They try to make it look like some kind of very selective, paternalistic thing. They caricaturate a lot but otherwise that article is ok.

Quote:
Throughout this year, Tennis Week is examining the player development efforts of various countries worldwide, including those with a long history of great players and those hoping to establish a tradition that future generations will admire and uphold. This is the fourth installment in the series.


En Garde
The French have player development down to a system that can’t be beat
By Whit Sheppard

Tennis Week print magazine
May 24, 2005
Pgs 38-43

Perhaps it’s only fitting that, in a nation that reveres engineering acumen (think the TGV high-speed train, the Eiffel Tower, Airbus’ new twin-deck A380 plane) as much as the cultivation of things that contribute to la joie de vivre (think the 35-hour work week, up to 500 different kinds of cheese, some of the world’s best wine and foie gras), the French tennis development program is a highly-structured, carefully-plotted system that continues to give France an influence in the tennis world beyond the sum of its various parts.

In a nation of nearly 60 million inhabitants, one without a native-born Grand Slam champion since Yannick Noah beat Sweden’s Mats Wilander to capture Roland Garros in 1983 (2000 Roland Garros winner and naturalized Frenchwoman Mary Pierce was born in Montreal), the French system of identifying, training, and supporting junior players from age 7 onward continues to deliver results envied by all but a few tennis-playing nations.

In the ATP’s latest Indesit Entry Rankings (as of May 9), 10 French players were in the Top 100, lead by former Top 10 player Sebastien Grosjean at No. 27. Only Spain, with 15 players in the Top 100, and Argentina, also with 10, can claim equivalent or greater depth on the men’s side. The United States, with a population five times greater than France, currently sports seven of the world’s Top 100 men, led by third-ranked Andy Roddick.

Add to the mix for France three Davis Cup titles since 1991 and two more appearances in the Davis Cup finals, and you get a sense of the efficacy of the French development program on the men’s side.

The French women have fared almost as well, with eight Top 100 players in the latest Sony Ericsson WTA Tour rankings, including three in the Top 20 (No. 3 Amelie Mauresmo, No. 16 Nathalie Dechy, and No. 19 Tatiana Golovin) and two Fed Cup titles and a runner-up trophy since 1997.

The seat of power in French tennis is situated a stone’s throw from Court Centrale at Roland Garros in leafy western Paris, in the offices of the Federation Francaise de Tennis (FFT), the Gallic equivalent of the United States Tennis Association. The 20-acre site also houses the CNE, or National Training Center, where the most promising French juniors are trained, housed, and funded by the federation.

Among current French tour players, Grosjean (who was shown the door by the federation at one point because of his lack of height), Dechy, Mauresmo,rising player Gael Monfils, Nicolas Escude, Fabrice Santoro, Michael Llodra and Emilie Loit are alums of the FFT’s development regime. Players such as Richard Gasquet, Paul-Henri Mathieu, and Nathalie Tauziat have also benefited to some degree from the federation’s support.

The continued success of the French in international team competition begs two important questions: To what do the French owe their great success in Davis Cup and Fed Cup, and why have they so far not been able to achieve equivalent success in Grand Slam singles play?

Eric Deblicker, longtime director of the high-level French men’s development program and, since September 2004, Gasquet’s full-time coach, has this to say about the disparity between team and individual results among the French players:

“Davis Cup is very important in France and has been ever since we beat the Americans in Lyon in 1991,” says Deblicker, emphasizing recent history, without the intent of ignoring the Davis Cup success of the Four Musketeers, whose 1927 triumph against the United States inspired the construction of Roland Garros. “The spirit of the team is the major factor. It’s a priority for French players to play for France. With Davis Cup, our players don’t play tournaments the week before, as the team gathers to train and eat together straight through the tie. They’re very happy to work together and everyone is behind the captain (former Top 10 player Guy Forget).”

As for producing another French Grand Slam tournament winner, Deblicker says, “We are trying to fix this challenge for our young players like Mathieu, Gasquet, and Monfils. We have to instill this mentality in them and our first priority is to win at Roland Garros, as it’s our home court.”

Ironically, it has been the emergence in recent years of Roland Garros on the world tennis stage, from an afterthought behind the US Open and Wimbledon to a must-watch, must-visit Grand Slam event, that has helped fill the FFT’s coffers with the vital cash that helps fund the development of French junior players. The tournament generates an estimated $35 million to $40 million per year.

Former French tour player Georges Goven, who heads the federation’s high-level women’s development program, remembers when times were different. “The money that comes in from Roland Garros is key,” says Goven. “With it, we can afford to put very capable people in the right places in France.

“Forty years ago we had only five or six people paid and working full-time for the federation,” Goven adds, crediting former FFT and ITF President Philippe Chatrier, for whom Court Central was renamed in 2001, as the originator of the development program in the early ’70s. “Now we’re more like a mid-sized business, with around 300 people on the payroll.”

The road to a coveted place at the CNE or INSEP, the National Institute of Sport and Physical Education, where the most talented 16- to 18-year-old boys train before coming over to the CNE at age 19, is an arduous one that somewhat mimics the French higher education system. In that crucible, pools of thousands of prospective students are whittled down through a series of concours nationaux, or nationwide entry exams, to gain entrance to France’s most prestigious institutions of higher learning. Entering classes of 100-400 are the norm at these specialized Grandes Ecoles, which out-Ivy the Ivies with their stringent selection process.

The tennis version of this paper chase typically begins at age 7, when each of France’s 2,500 or so tennis clubs are encouraged to select two or three gifted players ages 7-10 and provide them with special group and individual instruction. Anywhere from 4,000 to 6,000 players make this first cut-off and enter the national system.

The next step is to winnow this group down to the 160 or so players (girls 10-12 and boys 11-13) who are regionally selected to make it to the next level, the Avenir National, by coaches empowered and monitored by the FFT in Paris. The objective at this stage is to continue the players’ formation while identifying which players will move forward under the auspices of the federation to the penultimate level in the system, Les Poles France.

Next, only 12-16 of the most promising girls (ages 13-15) are chosen to continue their training at either the CNE in Paris or a similar center in Toulouse, in the southwest of France. A total of roughly 30 junior boys (ages 14-15) go through equivalent training at one of three regional centers.

Only after having passed through these three preliminary stages to the most promising French juniors get their tickets punched for the high-level training in the Groupes Espoirs at INSEP or the National Training Center (CNE).

Casting a glance at the progression of current French tour players through the national development system, three of the four native-born French players to have reached a Grand Slam tournament final since Henri Leconte did so in 1988 at Roland Garros – Arnaud Clement (2001 Australian Open), Cedric Pioline (1993 US Open, 1997 Wimbledon), and Nathalie Tauziat (1998 Wimbledon) – accomplished their success largely independent of the FFT’s development program. (The fourth, Mauresmo, was runner-up at the 1999 Australian Open).

Gasquet, named ITF World Junior Champion in 2002 after winning the French and US Open junior titles, is a good example of the buffet approach to the development offered by the FFT. Originally coached by his father, a teaching pro, Gasquet entered the system at the Groupes Espoirs level in 2002. He spent one year training at the CNE at Roland Garros before receiving private coaching, subsidized by the federation for another year, for a total of two years in the program.

Developing patience from the baseline has reaped dividends in 2005 for the 18-year-old Frenchman, whose ranking has climbed to No. 56 after winning two consecutive clay court challengers in Italy before bouncing world No. 1 Roger Federer in the quarterfinals of the recent ATP Masters Series Monte Carlo.

“We’ve never had a player so young and so talented at 12, 13 years old (as Gasquet),” says outgoing National Technical Director Jean-Claude Massias, who, after a nine-year run as the FFT’s national technical director, is ceding his place to Patrice Dominguez. “He was truly better than all the others there. But he lost a couple of years. There was a lot of pressure on him, his father protected him a lot and he didn’t do what was necessary with the physical plan or train as much as we advised him to.

“I’m not surprised at his recent results,” Massias continues, “but we were quite worried a year or so ago, has he was not progressing well, was defaulting matches and looked unhappy on the court. Having great talent doesn’t always ensure that a player becomes a great player and we were worried about Richard.”

It wasn’t until Gasquet began working intensively with Deblicker, with whom he initially came into contact while training at the CNE, that his results began to approximate his considerable talent.

Says Massias, “I’m only surprised that it (Gasquet’s strong results) happened so soon after starting to work with Eric [Deblicker].”

Adds Deblicker, “Richard was like a lot of very talented players. He wanted to finish points after two or three shots. But he was playing the wrong way. We’ve worked with him on extending rallies until he has better positioned himself to go for a winner.”

The shy Gasquet, who speaks with a bit of a stammer and can’t be described as an eager media subject, has even learned to handle off-court notoriety and show a sense of humor as well. Appearing recently on a French chat show, one of Gasquet’s fellow guests was a noted porn actress. He said afterward, “It was a bit embarrassing. I’d never met anyone who did that job before.”

Monfils, 18, has seen his star on the ascension after compiling at 31-2 match record and winning three of the four 2004 junior Slam tournaments (Australian Open, Roland Garros, and Wimbledon). With a current ranking of 81, the lanky all-courter has delivered similiarly impressive results on the men’s tour in 2005, opening the year with a win over defending Roland Garros champion and world No. 6 Gaston Gaudio in Qatar, advancing with a wildcard to the round of 16 at the NASDAQ-100 Open in Miami and beating crafty French veteran Fabrice Santoro to win his first title on the men’s circuit in early May at a challenger event on clay in Tunisia.

Monfils was identified as a player of promise at age 11 and passed successively through all levels of the national development system with the exception of the final rung of the ladder, Les Groupes Espoirs. The FFT, in fact, encouraged him to skip the last step, deeming him ready for the big time and matching him up with former pro Thierry Champion as his coach.

The success of the French program ensures that the pipeline continues churning out another generation of talented French players after Gasquet, Monfils, and 19th-ranked women’s player Golovin, who teamed with Gasquet to win the mixed doubles at Roland Garros last year. Male contenders include hard-serving Jo-Wilifred Tsonga, the 2003 US Open boy’s singles champion and the world’s No. 2 junior that year; Gilles Simon, a 20-year-old ranked just outside the Top 100 who finished 2004 with a string of French futures wins; and Josselin Ouanna, who was runner-up to Monfils in the 2004 Australian Open boy’s singles. On the women’s side, 14-year-old Gracia Radovanovic, runner-up this year in the prestigious Les Petits As tournament, and 18-year-old Aravane Rezai, who has won three women’s circuit events since last October, are two players who bear watching.

With a solid organization, a war chest of cash and continued popularity of tennis in France (second only to soccer in the number of participants nationwide), the French tennis development system shows no signs of slowing down. It seems almost as inevitable as another bumper crop of Burgandy or Beaujolais that French players will continue to flourish on the world stage and one day break through to give L’Héxagone the Grand Slam champion to succeed Noah that it so craves.


Whit Sheppard is a Paris-based sportswriter. He has written for the Houston Chronice, the Tampa Tribune, and the Buenos Aires Herald, among others. This is his first entry for Tennis Week.
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Old 10-22-2005, 05:46 PM   #25
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Default Re: ~~The "Young Hopes" Thread~~

And here's the translation (thanks to the poster litchis on Rg.net's forum) for those who speak better French than English here. I took the initiative to cut his comments because they were disturbing , in the middle of the translation...


Quote:
Tout au long de cette année, Tennis Week examinera les moyens de formation des joueurs mis au point dans différents pays du monde dont certains pays possèdant une longue tradition de grands joueurset ceux espèrant établir une tradition que les génération futures admireront chercher à imiter. C'est le quatrième volet de notre série d'études.

En Garde
La formation du joueur de tennis chez les Français repose sur un système bien huilé imbattable.
De Whit Sheppard

Tennis Week Magazine
du 24 mai 2005
pages 38 à 43

Peut-être n'est-ce qu'appoprié pour une nation qui vénère l'acuité et la finesse dans le domaine du génie industriel, de l'ingénérie (pensez au TGV, à la Tour Eiffel, au nouvel Airbus A380 à deux niveaux...) autant que la culture de ce qui contribue à entretenir la joie de vivre (pensez cette fois-ci à la semaine de 35 heures, jusqu'aux 500 formes différentes de fromages que compte ce pays,à quelques uns des meilleurs des vins au monde et au foie gras...), le sytème de formation à la française est très structuré et minutieusement imaginé pour permettre à la France de continuer à avoir une grande influence dans le monde du tennis dans sa totalité bien que ne faisant pas bonne figure dans certains de ses domaines-clés.

Dans une nation qui compte presque 60 millions d'habitants, sans natif du pays ayant gagné de tournoi du Grand Chelem depuis que Yannick Noah a battu le Suèdois Mats Wilander pour s'adjuger le titre de Roland Garros en 1983 (la vainqueure de Roland Garros 2000, Mary Pierce a été naturalisée française mais est née à Montréal), le système de détection, d'entraînement et d'encadrement des jeunes joueurs dès l'âge de sept ans puis d'année en année continue de produire des résultats enviés par toutes les nations du tennis à l'exception d'une poignée de mieux lotis.

Dans le dernier classement technique Indesit (celui du 9 mai), 10 joueurs français faisaient parti du Top 100, menés par l'ancien joueur du Top 10 Sébastien Grosjean à la 27ème place. Seules l'Espagne, avec 15 joueurs dans le Top 100 et l'Argentine, qui en compte également 10, peuvent une profondeur équivalente ou meilleure de joueurs masculins au meilleur niveau. Les Etats-Unis et leur population cinq fois supérieure à celle de la France, ne présentent actuellement que sept des 100 meilleurs joueurs mondiaux masculins avec à leur tête Andy Roddick à la troisième place du classement.

Ajoutez-y les trois titres de la France en Coupe Davis depuis 1991 (1991, 1996, 2001) ainsi que deux finales (1999, 2002), et vous avez déjà une petite idée de l'efficacité du sytème de formation français du côtés des messieurs.

Les joueuses françaises se sont débrouillées presque aussi bien avec huit d'entre elles dans le Top 100 du classement WTA Sony Ericssonn, dont trois dans le Top 20 (Amélie Mauresmo N°3, Nathalie Dechy N°16, Tatiana Golovin N°19) au jour d'aujourd'hui et comptant deux titres en Fed Cup et une place de vice-championnes depuis 1997.

Le siège des pouvoirs du tennis français est situé à deux pas du Court Central de Roland Garros dans un quartier verdoyant de l'Ouest parisien, dans les bureaux de la Fédération Française de Tennis (FFT), l'équivalent gaulois de l'USTA (United States Tennis Association). Le site de 20 acres acueille aussi le CNE ou Centre National d' Entraînement, où la plupart des Juniors français sont entraînés, logés, financés par la fédération.

Parmi les joueurs français actuellement sur le circuit, Grosjean (qui s'est vu demandé de prendre la porte par la fédération il fut un temps à cause de sa petite taille) Dechy, Mauresmo, la star montante Gaël Monfils, Nicolas Escudé, Fabrice santoro, Michaël Llodra et Emile Loit ont été formé dans le giron fédéral. D'autres joueurs comme Richard Gasquet, Paul-Henri Mathieu et Nathalie Tauziat ont également bénéficié à un certain niveau du support de la fédération.

La poursuite du succès des Français dans les compétitions internationales par équique fait que deux questions s'imposent: A quoi les Français doivent leurs grands succès en Coupe davis et en Fed Cup, et pourquoi ne semblent-ils pas capables d'arriver au même succès en individuel dans les Grands Chelems?

Eric Deblicker, depuis longtemp à la tête du programme français de formation au haut niveau des jeunes joueurs du côté masculin, et, depuis septembre 2004, entraîneur de Gasquet à plein temps, a ceci à dire à propos de cette disparité entre les résultats individuels et collectifs des joueurs français:

"La Coupe Davis revet une importance particulière en France et cela depuis que nous avons battu les Américains à Lyon en 1991", éclaire-t-il, mettant l'accent sur l'histoire récente, mais sans l'intention d'ignorer le succès en Coupe Davis des quatre Mousquetaires, dont le triomphe en 1927 contre les etats-Unis fut à l'origine de la construction de Roland-Garros. "L'esprit de corps au sein de notre équipe est un des facteurs majeurs de ces succès. C'est une priorité pour les joueurs français de jouer pour la france à un moment de leur carrière. Lors de la Coupe Davis, nos joueurs ne participent à aucun tournoi la semaine qui précède une rencontre, puisque l'équipe se rassemble pour s'entraîner et vivre ensemble directement jusqu'à la rencontre. Ils sont heureux de travailler ensemble et tout le monde est derrière le capitaine (l'ancien joueur du Top 10, Guy Forget)"

Quant au développement d'un futur vainqueur d'un tournoi du Grand Chelem, Deblicker explique: "Nous essayons de faire relever ce défi que nous nous sommes donné à nos jeunes joueurs comme Mathieu, Gasquet et Monfils. Nous devons instiller en eux cette mentalité et notre priorité est de les voir gagner à Roland Garros sachant que ce court c'est notre chez nous."

Ironiquement, c'est l'émergence sur la scène tennistique internationale du tournoi de Roland Garros, passés du statut de second couteau derrière l'Us Open et Wimbledon à celui d'événement incontournable du circuit des levées du Grand Chelem à voir et à visiter, qui a aidé à remplir les caisses de la FFT avec les indispensables fonds permettant de financer le programme de formation des jeunes joueurs français. Le tournoi génère une somme estimée entre 30 et 40 millions de dollars US chaque année.

L'ancien joueur Georges Goven, qui est à la tête du département de formation des joueuses au haut niveau, se rappelle qu'anciennement les temps étaient différents: "L'argent qui entre maintenant du fait de roland Garros est la clé." dit-il. "C'est grâce à cet argent que nous pouvons nous permettre d'installer des gens très compétents aux bons postes en France."

"Il y a quarante ans de cela, il n'y avait que cinq ou six salariés employés à plein temps à la fédération" ajoute-t-il, reconnaissant le rôle de l'ancien président de la FFT et de l'ITF Philippe Chatrier, pour lequel le Court central fut renomé en 2001, en tant qu'instigateur du programme de formation au tout début des années soixante-dix. "Maintenant, nous correspondons plus à une PME avec environ 300 personnes au boulot chez nous."

La route qui mène jusqu'à une place très convoitée au CNE ou à l'INSEP, Institut National du Sport et de l'Education Physique, où s'entraînent les plus talentueux des jeunes garçons âgés entre 16 et 18 ans avant de gagner le CNE à 19 ans, est ardue et imite, dans une certaine mesure, les échelons de la voie royale des études supérieures du système éducatif français. Dans ce creuset, des groupes de milliers d'aspirants étudiants sont soumis à une sélection draconienne, triés sur le volets par des concours nationaux afin de gagner leur droit d'entrée dans l'une de ces prestigieuses institutions de formation supérieure. Entrer dans une classe de 100 à 400 élèves est la norme dans ces Grandes Ecoles spécialisées, qui surpassent notre Ivy League par leur processus de sélection si rigoureusement strictes.

La version tennistique de ce rallye-paper commence traditionalement à 7 ans, quand chacun des environs 2.500 clubs de tennis que comptent la france sont encouragés à selectionner deux ou trois joueurs doués âgés entre 7 et 10 ans et leur offrir une instruction particulière collectivement et individuellement. Partout, entre 4000 et 6000 jeunes joueurs parviennent à faire parti de cette sélection et entre dans le système national.

L'étape suivante est la "vannure" de ce groupe à seulement à peu près 160 joueurs, bons grains séparés d'avec l'ivraie...(des filles de 10-12 ans et des garçons de 11-13 ans) qui sont choisis au niveau régional pour tenter d'atteindre le niveau supérieur: le pôle Avenir National gèré par des entraîneurs mis en fonction et contrôlés par la FFT depuis Paris. L'objectif à ce stade, est de poursuivre la formation de ces jeunes tout en identifiant ceux qui vont aller plus loin sous les auspices de la fédération jusqu'à l'avant-dernier des niveaux de ce système: les Pôles France.

Ensuite, seules 12/16 des jeunes joueuses les plus prometteuses (âgées entre 13 et 15 ans) sont présentis pour parfaire leur formation dans l'un des centres d'entraînement qui leur est ouvert: soit le CNE à Paris ou un centre similaire à Toulouse dans le Sud-Ouest de la France. Un total approchant la trentaine de jeunes garçons (âgés entre 14 et 15 ans) passe par le même entraînement dans l'un des trois centres régionaux mis en place à cet égard.

Ce n'est qu'uniquement après être passés par ces trois étapes préliminaires que les Juniors français les plus prometteurs obtiennent leur billet pour les centres d'entraînement au haut niveau dans les Groupes Espoirs de l'INSEP ou du Centre National d'Entraînement (CNE).

En jettant un rapide coup d'oeuil sur la progression des joueurs français étant passé par le système national de formation, évoluant sur le circuit actuellement, trois des quatres joueurs nés en France à avoir atteint une finale en Grand Chelem depuis Leconte en 1988 à Roland Garros – Arnaud Clément (à l'Open d'Australie en 2001), Cédric Pioline (à l'US Open en 1993, à Wimbledon en 1997), Nathalie Tauziat (à Wimbledon en 1998) – ont accomplis ces succès en ayant évolué largement indépendemment du système de formation de la FFT. (La quatrième, Amélie Mauresmo, a été vice-championne à l'Open d'Australie en 1999)

Gasquet, qui a est devenu le Champion du monde Junior ITF en 220 après avoir remporté les titres des Internationaux de France et des Etats-Unis Junior, est un bon exemple de l'"approche buffet" que le système de formation de la FFT permet d'offrir à certains. D'abord entraîné par son père, un professeur de tennis,mais toujours scruté attentivement par la fédération attendant son heure de loin, Gasquet a intégré le système au niveau des Groupes Espoirs en 2002. Il a alors passé un an à s'entraîner au CNE à Roland-Garros avant de recevoir un entraînement privé et personnalisé fournit par la fédération pour une année de plus et un total de deux ans dans son programme.

Apprendre à développer sa patience du fond du court a porté ses fruits en 2005 pour le Français de 18 ans, dont le classement a atteint la 56ème place mondiale après avoir remporté deux titres consécutifs en Challengers sur terre battue en Italie puis avoir explosé Federer au niveau des quarts de finale du récent tournoi Masters Series de Monte-Carlo.

"Nous n'avions jamais eu un joueur aussi jeune et aussi talentueux à 12, 13 ans (comme l'était Gasquet)" affirme l'ancien Directeur Technique National Jean-Claude Massias, qui après neuf ans à occuper cette fonction du sommet de la FFT, cède sa place à Patrice Dominguez. "Il était vraiment un cran au dessus des autres autour de lui. Mais il a perdu quelques années. Il y avait beaucoup de pression sur lui, son père le protègeait beaucoup et n'a pas fait ce qu'il était nécessaire de planifier ni de travailler au niveau physique comme nous le lui avions conseiller."

"Je ne suis pas surpris de ses récents résultats." continue Massias "mais nous étions très inquiets par rapport à lui il y a à peu près un an, vu qu'il ne progressait pas bien, balançait des matches et ne semblait pas heureux sur le court. Possèder beaucoup de talent n'assure pas que l'on deviendra un grand joueur du coup nous étions inquiets pour Richard."

Massias précise: " Je suis seulement surpris que ça (les bons résultats de Gasquet) soit arrivé si rapidement après qu'il ait commencé à travailler avec Eric [Deblicker]."

Deblicker ajoute: " Richard était comme beaucoup de joueurs très tentueux. Il voulait finir les points après deux ou trois frappes. Mais il jouait de la mauvaise façon. Avec lui, nous avons travaillé à apprendre à rallonger les rallies jusqu'à ce qu'il soit dans une assez bonne position pour tenter un coup gagnant."

Le timide Gasquet, qui parle avec un lèger bégaiement et ne peut pas être décrit comme un gars passioné et avide d'attention médiatique, a même appris à gèrer les retombées de sa notoriété hors court et à manifester un certain sens de l'humour. Récemment apparu dans une émission de télévision française, une des autres invitées sur le plateau était une fameuse actrice de pornographie. Il a alors déclaré après l'enregistrement: "C'était un peu embarrassant. Je n'avais encore jamais rencontré quelqu'un qui faisait ce métier."

Monfils, 18 ans, a vu son statut de star sur l'ascension après avoir empilé un bilan record de 31-2 matches en ratio victoires-défaites et gagné trois des quatres tournoi du Grand Chelem chez les Juniors (Open d'Australie, Roland Garros et Wimbledon). Avec un classement actuel à la 81ème place, ce joeur multi-surface à l'aspect eflanqué a lui aussi eu des résultats également impressionants sur le circuit masculin en 2005, débutant son année avec une victoire sur le tenant du titre de Roland Garros 2004 et numéro 6 mondial Gaston Gaudio au Quatar, bénéficiant d'une Wild card et se hissant jusqu'aux seizièmes de finale aux Masters Series de Miami, venant à bout du vétéran truqueur Fabrice Santoro et gagnant son premier titre sur le circuit masculin début mai au tournoi Challenger de Tunis sur terre battue.

Monfils a été détecté comme un joueur à fort potentiel à l'âge de 11 ans et a par conséquent eu affaire à tous les échelons du système de formation national à l'exception du dernier barreau de l'échelle, les Groupes Espoirs. C'est même la FFT qui l'a encouragé à sauter cette dernière étape, le sentant prêt à faire le saut chez les pros et le pairant avec l'ancien joueur professionnel Thierry Champion comme entraîneur.

Le succès du modèle de formation à la française assure que la source continue à déverser une autre génération de talents français après Gasquet, Monfils et la 19ème mondiale Golovin qui a fait équipe avec Gasquet pour gagner Roland Garros en double mixte l'année dernière. La listes des postulants masculins comprend aussi le gros serveur Jo-Wilfried Tsonga, vainqueur de l'US Open Junior en 2003 et deuxième mondial au niveau Junior la même année, Gilles Simon, un jeune joueur de 20 ans classé juste hors du Top 100 qui a finit 2004 par une série de victoires dans des Futures français et Josselin Ouanna qui était le vice-champion de L'Open d'Australie Junior en 2004 face à Monfils. Du côtés féminin, la jeune Gracia Radovanovic, vice-championne cette année au prestigieux tournoi des Petits As, et Aravane Rezai, 18 ans qui a gagné trois petits tournois du circuit féminin depuis octobre dernier sont deux joueuses qu'il vaut la peine de surveiller.

Avec une organisation solide, une battaille d'argent et de popularité persistante du tennis en France (deuxième sport derrière le football en terme de pratiquants sur tout le territoire), le modèle de formation français ne présente aucun signe de ralentissement. Cela semble presque aussi inévitable que l'assurance de voir arriver chaque année un autre cru de Bourgogne et de Beaujolais que les joueurs français vont continuer à faire leur appariton sur la scène tennistique internationale et jusqu'à un jour exploser et donner à L'Héxagone le champion vainqueur de Grand Chelem pour succèder à Noah qu'il attend tant.

Whit Sheppard est un journaliste sportif basé à Paris. Il a entre autres écrit pour le Houston Chronicle, le Tampa Tribune et le Buenos Aires Herald. Ceci est sa première contribution à la rédaction de Tennis Week.

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Old 10-23-2005, 11:31 AM   #26
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Default Re: ~~The "Young Hopes" Thread~~

Quote:
Originally Posted by delsa
Where in Tennis Mag' could it be read?
Isn't it a bit concerning rather than impressive actually? What's the goal of this Lagardère guy?
I've read many things about this but i still don't get how there wouldn't be some kind of competition/rivalry between him, "his project" (which is? btw) and the fft.
It's in the last pages if I remember well in a little corner (écrit en rouge).
I find it a little concerning too. That's why I said that soon the FFT will be useless. Lagardere says that he wants to help in the development of french tennis but the best way for him to do that would be to help directly the FFT instead of creating private structures only for some players. I am sure there will be 'political' troubles between him and the fft in the coming years.
And I don't understand what is the goal of Lagardere either.
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Old 01-29-2006, 04:03 PM   #27
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Default Re: ~~The "Young Hopes" Thread~~

Alexandre Sidorenko won the Australian Open Junior!

Link to the thread started by Silverwhite about this in GM: http://www.menstennisforums.com/showthread.php?t=67501&page=1&pp=15
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Old 07-25-2006, 09:48 AM   #28
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Default Re: ~~The "Young Hopes" Thread~~

Well, so far Eysseric's lead the new team which has retained the Winter Cup, won and made the final two 2 or 3 tournaments i think...

Inzé is in some kind of slump after having suffered injuries.

Vincent Sapène is now making some noise...

Botti. I don't know about him.

Same for Piro, Slilam etc...but i must admit i didn't search a lot to say the least...

How come nobody takes care of this thread?

I'll have to bump it in the future and post the updates when i'll have time...

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Old 07-25-2006, 11:28 AM   #29
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Default Re: ~~The "Young Hopes" Thread~~

Thanks for all the great work Delsa!
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Old 08-12-2006, 06:57 PM   #30
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Default Re: ~~The "Young Hopes" Thread~~

Woaow!!!!!!

http://www.tenniseurope.org/JuniorTe...nder-Boys.aspx

Quote:



Photo: Marie-Thérèse Brühwiler

2006 European Junior Championships - 18 & Under Boys

Sixteen-year old Jonathan Eysseric of France won his first European Junior Championships title in Klosters, Switzerland, with a 7-6 6-4 win over fourth seed Dusan Lojda (CZE). The second seed, who dropped just one set during the tournament, raced through the first set tie-break without the loss of a point and never looked back. The win consolidates Eysseric's position in the ITF Junior Ranking top ten (3), and is his biggest individual title to date.


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Thanks for all the great work Delsa!
You're welcome.

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