>> Rafa news and articles << - Page 140 - MensTennisForums.com

MensTennisForums.com

MenstennisForums.com is the premier Men's Tennis forum on the internet. Registered Users do not see the above ads.Please Register - It's Free!

Reply

Old 12-19-2010, 09:52 PM   #2086
country flag Yazoo.C
Registered User
 
Yazoo.C's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 729
Yazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: >> Rafa news and articles <<

Rafael Nadal wins BBC Overseas Sports Personality of the Year 2010

Men’s tennis number one Rafael Nadal has won the BBC Overseas Sports Personality of the Year award.

The 24-year-old Spaniard won a remarkable three Grand Slams in 2010 - the French Open, Wimbledon and the US Open, as well three Masters titles.

In winning the US Open, Nadal became only the seventh man in history to complete the set of majors.

He also became the first male since Rod Laver in 1969 to win the French Open, Wimbledon and US Open in the same year.

Nadal now has nine Grand Slams with world number two Roger Federer’s haul of 16 titles in his sights.

Last year, Nadal was beset by numerous problems including knee tendonitis, abdominal pain, a knee injury and the break-up of his parents.

The tendonitis forced him to miss Wimbledon and he subsequently dropped outside the top three in August 2009 for the first time since 2005.

But the Spaniard bounced back brilliantly this year beginning with a fifth French Open title, defeating Swede Robin Soderling 6-4 6-2 6-4 at Roland Garros. He regained the world number one spot as a result and left Federer one week short of Pete Sampras’s record of 286 weeks at the top.

The Majorca resident then won his second Wimbledon title with a 6-3 7-5 6-4 victory over 12th seed Czech player Tomas Berdych.

And Nadal made it a hat-trick of Slams with 6-4 5-7 6-4 6-2 win against Novak Djokovic.

Victory saw him join Federer, Andre Agassi, Roy Emerson, Rod Laver, Don Budge and Fred Perry in the group of male players who have won every major.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Rafael Nadal
"I'm really sorry I can't be there tonight. It's an honour to win this award. Thanks to the BBC. It's a dream to be among the list of great champions."

http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport1/hi/tv_a...ar/9288075.stm
__________________________________________________ _________________________

Congrats Rafa!!! truly deserved the award
Yazoo.C is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 

Old 12-19-2010, 10:54 PM   #2087
country flag FormerRafaFan
Registered User
 
FormerRafaFan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Oslo
Posts: 7,014
FormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: >> Rafa news and articles <<

I said it in another thread, but I might as well say it here too.. Congrats to Rafa for winning the BBC award. Very well deserved of course

Thanks for posting the article, Yazoo.C
__________________
DELPO

Also supporting known chokers Verdasco, Lopez and Monaco

Quote:
Originally Posted by rubbERR View Post
Verdasco was their cheerleader, number one mascot.
They let him play tennis once after they saw his "consistency is everything" advertisement.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JarkaFish View Post
Joke thread? Kohlschreiber clowns this servebot in 3.
Maybe 4 or 5 if he wants to get more of a workout in.
FormerRafaFan is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 12-19-2010, 11:10 PM   #2088
country flag Yazoo.C
Registered User
 
Yazoo.C's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 729
Yazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: >> Rafa news and articles <<

Quote:
Originally Posted by sokk View Post
I said it in another thread, but I might as well say it here too.. Congrats to Rafa for winning the BBC award. Very well deserved of course

Thanks for posting the article, Yazoo.C
You're welcome

The original article has been updated a little and now includes this:

Andy Murray: "He fights so hard on the court, he treats every match like it's going to be the last one and he's one of the best players of all time"

Roger Federer: "I think what Rafa has done at such a young age, so consistently, is quite phenomenal really and he's the best player by far in 2010"

Novak Djokovic: "What's amazing about him is his mental ability to play continuously, each year better and betterHe's actually improving. He's a real example of a tennis champion."

There is a recorded video of all this but unfortunately it's only for UK viewers.

There's also an interesting timeline

RAFAEL NADAL TIMELINE

1986: Born 3 June
2003: Makes top 50 for first time
2005: June - wins French Open title on debut
2006: Defends French open title with 59-game unbeaten streak
2007: May - Winning streak on clay ends at 81 matches with defeat in the final of Hamburg Masters to Federer
2007: Wins third straight French Open
2007: Loses Wimbledon final to Federer over five sets
2008: Beats Federer to win fourth successive French Open title to become fifth player to win a Grand Slam without dropping a set
2008: Beats Federer to win first Wimbledon title and become first man since Borg in 1980 to hold Wimbledon and French Open titles simultaneously
2008: August - Wins Olympic gold in Beijing
2009: Beats Federer to win first Australian Open
2010: January - Retires with knee injury in Australian Open quarter-final
2010: June - Beats Thomas Berdych to claim second Wimbledon title
2010: September - Defeats Djokovic in US to win ninth Slam
Yazoo.C is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2010, 10:42 PM   #2089
country flag Eden
Congrats guys
 
Eden's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Age: 39
Posts: 21,714
Eden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: >> Rafa news and articles <<

There was a German report about Rafa in the magazine which was handed out at the exhibition match in Zürich.

I translated it:


Fiery bull on the court, pattern son at home in Mallorca: Rafael Nadal only has one aim along with being #1 - to live a completely normal life

The wild man being gentle

By Juan José Ruiz-Galvez

"What's being the hell for you is the paradise for me!" This sentence, which was spoken in one of the action movies of John Rambo, is written on the T-Shirts of a group of young people who follow a tennismatch on TV in Mallorca. It is 2008 and it is the Wimbledon final they are watching. Roger Federer against Rafael Nadal. Many say it's the best tennismatch which has ever been played. 4:48 hours, 5 sets, 2 rain breaks and countless brilliant shots. The Spaniard prevails and wins his first title in London. It is another chapter in the sporting rivalry between two of the best players which this sport has ever seen and which will now find a continuation in the "Match for Africa" in the Hallenstadion.

The sentence on the T-Shirts of the Nadal fans is an abbreviated version of his motto never to give up in any situation on the court. "What's being the hell for you is the paradise for me" - Nadal is Rambo with a racket in his hand. And much more. "My goal has ever been to get better. But not to get better than the others but to get better than I have been."

The Spaniard so far won 9 Grand Slam titles, Olympic Gold and 3 times the Davis Cup. He is ranked #1. But Rafa is more than just numbers and stats. He is a combination of reverence of the game, training input and the faith in the magic abilities of his coach. He is a master of self-motivation. His friends tell that he was playing once as a youngster in the doubles against opponents from Japan and motivate himself to take revenge for all the slaughtered delphins at the Japanese coasts.

There are recent examples for Nadals will and discipline: On the day after his Wimbledon victory last summer one was looking in vain for him celebrating at a private beach. A few hours after he danced with Serena Williams at the Champions Ball he took a plane to Spain in order to start medical therapy there for his damaged knee. After he won the US Open - the last Grand Slam tournament which has been missing in his collection so far - he said: "It was hurting like hell. The next time I'm going to take an injection against the pains. I wouldn't be able to go through it again. I nearly fainted on the court. It was terrible."

Rafa, the child. Born 1986 in Manacor on Mallorca. Already as a young child he loved what is still important for him today: an outdoor lifestyle. Sun, beach, fishing. Even though Monacor isn't a big town he was lucky to find there a perfect practice partner: Carlos Moya, who has been the #1 once for a short time. Today Manacor offers Rafa the opportunity to spend undisturbed time there with his big family. To this family belong for example his grandfather, a professional musician, his sister Maria Isabel, 20, and of course his girl-friend Maria Francisca Perello, 22, named Xisca, with who he is together since his teenager days, They all live together in the same house. It is understandable that his life started to falter briefly and he got into a sporting crisis when his parents Sebastian and Ana Maria got divorced in the summer of 2009 after more than 20 years of marriage.

Mallorca is his home, even with him being a worldwide fame. A while ago Nadal signed a contract as an advertising ambassador for the island. When the contract was about to get cancelled because of the financial crisis Rafa offered to be available for free. When Rafael Nadal is going on vacation abroad he prefers places like Malaysia or Mauritius. But he feels the most comfortable at his home where he can go out in the evening without getting pestered by people even though everyone know him.

You can meet him playing soccer with his cousins on the village square. It happens quite often that Rafa celebrates with his friends in the evening although he has to practice early the next morning. At the few opportunities he gets to return home because of all his travelling around the world he wants to meet all the people who are important for him. "It doesn't matter for me to come back home at 4 o'clock in the morning and to be on court at 10 o'clock. I'm just 24 years old and don't want to be excluded from the normal life."

This feeling to be able to live a normal life on Mallorca was responsible that the young Rafa turned down the offer from the Spanish tennis association to move to the national trainings camp in Barcelona. He prefers to work with his uncle Toni Nadal who is the one who edges his big career. A sharpening which starts with a simple decision. As a junior Rafa was serving really bad, no matter, if he was trying it out left- oder righthanded. Toni decides that Rafa has to completely convert his game to be played lefthanded if he wanted to improve. "Those were difficult training sessions back then before I had it internalized", Rafa remembers. "He taught me never to revert to old patterns. That's what made me strong, physically and mentally."

Rafa entrusted his development into the hands of Toni. As a junior he once had to play against someone who was older than him. He is nervous and afraid. Then uncle Toni said: "Don't worry. When you are starting to lose I'm going to try that it will begin to rain and that the match is going to get interrupted." And so it happened indeed: When Rafa was clearly behind it started to rain and the match got stopped. After a long break Nadal said to his uncle: "Now it's enough, you can make the rain go away. I think I'm going to win the match now."

In Rafa's family the story often is being told and laughed about. Rafa always had this blind trust to Toni. As a child Rafa believed his uncle that he was able to make him invisibly because his family pretended that they won't see him. At family soccer matches the little Nadal, whose uncle Miguel Angel once was a defender at Barcelona and played for the Spanish national team, always wanted to be in the team of Toni because they told him that he had once been a big player for AC Milan.

The aim to improvement is what pushes Rafael Nadal. When he arrived at the US Open 2010 he had a problem with his backhand. His serve is more error-prone in New York due to the wind there. So he works before the tournament alone at the way to hold his racket until he feels secure with it again. The effect: Beside his unpredictable lefthander game and his incomparable forehand he suddenly has a highly effective serve which poses unsolvable problems for his opponents. His biggest wish to play once in the New York final against the 5 times champion Roger Federer remained unfullfilled but he won the tournament for the first time and only lost 5 serving games on the way, which before him only Andy Roddick has been able to do.

Instead of meeting in New York Nadal and Federer will now meet in two exhibitions. First in Zürich, then in Madrid. They do it because of their mutual respect, even though both of the most dominant tennisplayers of the present get to hear for years that big champions have to hate each other, just like McEnroe and Connors. But Rafa and Roger found another way to treat each other.

That is not a PR campaign. At the Masters 2007 in Shanghai Nadal was playing soccer with colleagues in the small passage under the hall. He just had lost his SF against Federer. One could see at his dealing with the soccer ball that he once played competitive soccer in former times. In this moment another player passed, saw Nadal and cheered: "Maradona! Maradona!" Then he asked if he was allowed to play along.
Roger Federer is always welcome by Rafael Nadal.
Eden is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 12-24-2010, 11:59 PM   #2090
country flag Eden
Congrats guys
 
Eden's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Age: 39
Posts: 21,714
Eden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: >> Rafa news and articles <<

Santa Claus Visits from Majorca

Marco Falbo, Journalist

15.12.2010

At the height of his career and amid preparations for the upcoming season, Rafael Nadal is coming to Zurich to play against Roger Federer in the "Match for Africa" on December 21. Despite all his success, the winner of the last three Grand-Slam tournaments has remained modest and down-to-earth.



Everywhere you look in Majorca, you'll see Rafael Nadal. In his capacity as official spokesman for the Balearic Island, he greets you in 2D when you enter the vast Aeropuerto de Palma, which is bustling even in December. Larger than life, he smiles down from an office high-rise at the six-lane highway leading into the city center. And now, during Advent, his name is more pervasive than ever: "Nadal" is Catalan for Christmas. Everywhere you go, there is a "Mercat de Nadal," the Christmas market, and at the entrance to many towns, lights spell out "Bon Nadal" over the main street. This, of course, is no reflection on how well the island's most famous son has performed on tennis courts around the world.

Home Match under the Sun

The island of Majorca is home to the world's top tennis player, his fort and his fortress, where he recharges his batteries, reconnects with his youth, where he plays golf, fishes, hangs out with his old buddies, swims with his girlfriend Maria Francisca Perello in the ocean and, despite his fame, is mostly left alone. It's also where he trains intensively. The climate couldn't be more ideal: While central Europe freezes up and a blanket of snow puts a halt to the daily routine, the sun shines here with hardly a cloud in the sky. Temperatures reach around 20 degrees Celsius even in mid-December. Unlike his counterparts to the north, Nadal can practice outside during the brief but critical break at the end of the season. No need to travel further south – like Andy Murray, who flees to Florida, or Roger Federer, whose winter training camp is in Dubai.

Training to a T

Nadal's world is in the northeast of the island, in the city of Manacor (largely unspoiled by tourists) and the nearby cosmopolitan coastal town of Portocristo, where he owns a large property that includes a fully equipped fitness studio. This year he will interrupt his winter camp to play two exhibition matches with Roger Federer on December 21 in Zurich and one day later in Madrid. This is not something to be taken for granted – after all, December is the most important training and preparation month, when he gets ready to take his game to the next level. And he is as precise as one of his topspin strokes. He will take just two days off before beginning training, as he indicated during the ATP World Tour Finals in London, where he lost to Federer in the final.

"Phoenix from the Ashes"

His formula for success has already paid off this year. Although Nadal failed to win any tournaments after June 2009, he emerged in January 2010 in far better form. Who knows what might have happened, had a left knee injury not forced him to succumb in the quarterfinal against Andy Murray. What followed was almost like the mythical resurrection of Phoenix from the ashes. After Nadal failed to win a tournament for ten months, there was no holding back the left-hander (who many had given up on) once the 2010 season on the sand began. He won six of his next nine tournaments, starting with the Masters 1000 events in Monte Carlo, Rome and Madrid, then the Grand Slams of Roland Garros, Wimbledon and Flushing Meadows (US Open). "The breakthrough was the French Open. After I won that, everything got much easier," he says looking back.

Chasing a Record

Nadal is now the first player since 1969 (Rod Laver) to win three of four major tournaments in a row in a single calendar year. If he makes the "Rafa Slam" at the Australian Open in January, he'll have all four major titles at once. At the age of 24, Nadal also became the youngest player in New York to win the four top tournaments at least once – the career Grand Slam. He already has nine of these trophies in his cabinet: five from Paris, two from Wimbledon and one each from Melbourne and New York. At the age of 24, Federer, the record champion with 16 such trophies, had a total of six. Despite all of that, the Spanish world champ doesn't dare compare himself to Switzerland's top star. "Federer is the greatest player of all time," he used to always say. And even now, at the height of his career, and after what was by far his greatest year, he said at the Masters in London: "Roger must be the world's best all-around player."

Staying Down-to-Earth

It seems he can hardly believe himself how well his career has advanced. This may be because his no-nonsense uncle, Toni Nadal, has always reminded him to be modest and humble. "Rafa has always had both feet firmly on the ground. I never took any excuses from him," says the 50-year-old, who is also one of the player's best friends. What's more, Nadal is rather shy and reserved, which might seem to contradict his fighting spirit and "never-say-die" attitude on the courts.

Unique Rivals

Nadal has no illusions of an easy match with Federer. The tally is 14:8, but the Spaniard knows that this number belies the fact that more than half of these duels took place on sand, his favorite surface. By direct comparison, he leads 10:2 on sand – though the two defeats were extremely painful for him. As he shook winner Federer's hand in 2007 after the final in Hamburg, it was his first defeat on sand after more than two years and 81 victories. Two years later, Federer spoiled Nadal's first sand tournament in Caja Mágica, Madrid's new luxury tennis facility.

A Christmas Gift

The question of winning or losing will be of secondary importance during the exhibition matches in Zurich and Madrid. This time, the main focus of the two rivals is to give the audience a great show and to collect money for a good cause. In a promotional video, Nadal says his performance in Zurich is his Christmas gift to Federer. He sure knows how to play Santa.

Source: https://emagazine.credit-suisse.com/...295539&lang=EN
Eden is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2010, 07:08 PM   #2091
country flag Eden
Congrats guys
 
Eden's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Age: 39
Posts: 21,714
Eden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond reputeEden has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: >> Rafa news and articles <<

Grand slammaster Rafael Nadal

Helena Frith Powell

Last Updated: Dec 25, 2010



Rafael Nadal is already one of the all-time greats of tennis. As he prepares to play here in Abu Dhabi, Helena Frith Powell speaks to the world No. 1 about winning and losing, and how his solid home base in Majorca makes him the most grounded of sporting superstars.

The world's No. 1 tennis player is far less imposing in real life than he is on the court. He is sitting on a leather sofa, wearing a rather lurid green top and white tracksuit bottoms, tapping away at his BlackBerry as I walk in for our meeting. When the PR person introduces us, he stands up, smiles and shakes my hand. I am slightly disappointed. I had expected to meet the Jonah Lomu of tennis, a player who has grown men quavering in their sponsored socks. But who I am confronted with is more like a teenager.

Having said that, he is a young man with an extremely impressive record. Rafael Nadal has won nine Grand Slam titles, the first one (the French Open) in 2005. And again in 2006, 2007, 2008, 2010, earning him the nickname, The King of Clay.

He won Wimbledon in 2008 and 2010, becoming only the second Spaniard to do so after Manuel Santana, 20 years before Nadal was born. He won the Australian Open in 2009 and the US Open in 2010. He also won an Olympic gold medal for Spain in Beijing in 2008.

Despite his success, he has stayed grounded. He is one of the most popular players on the circuit, in part due to his humility. He puts it down to his family and the upbringing he has had. When he was 14 the Spanish tennis federation was keen to send him for training in Barcelona, the heart of Spanish tennis. His family declined, preferring to keep him close. The gamble paid off, both in terms of the player (he joined the men's tour the following year, at the age of 15) and his personality. "However well you do, you have to realise that you are just another person," he says. "On the tennis court you may be different, you may be a star, but when you walk off the court you are not. It is very important to stay grounded.

"My will to win comes from my education," he adds. "Whether you are a tennis player, or whatever you do, education is the basis of everything."

Nadal's style of play has been described as aggressive, athletic and supremely defensive. Some say he "muscled" his way to the top of tennis, others call him one of the most intimidating players of the open era. With his 3,200rpm topspin (Roger Federer's is 2,500 and Andre Agassi's was 1,800), his capacity to cover the whole court and an attitude that never says die, he must be horrible to play against. And although his rivalry with Federer is the stuff of legend, you have to wonder if the Swiss player isn't thinking: "Why the hell did he have to come along?" Because without Nadal on the scene, he would undoubtedly have broken even more records.

Nadal first played tennis when his Uncle Toni (a former tennis pro) spotted that he had a talent for the game. At the time, Nadal was just three. As he grew older it became apparent that he was also an incredibly gifted footballer (his Uncle Miguel had played for Barcelona and Spain). At 12 he had to choose between the two; he went for tennis. Uncle Toni continued to coach him, and still does, although he has never been paid to do so.

"I always wanted to be a sportsman," Nadal says in his strong Spanish accent. "I wanted to be a tennis player or a football player and I am happy that I ended up doing what I always wanted to do." Would he encourage any future little Rafa Nadals to take up tennis? "Yeah sure, why not? It is a difficult life but things in life are normally difficult, there is nothing easy."

Nadal is also an excellent golfer and plays when he gets time off from tennis, which is hardly ever. He trains for four to six hours a day, every day. When he won the US Open he was asked how he was going to celebrate. He replied that celebrating is hard when "you know you have to train again the next day".

For Nadal, there seems to be time for tennis and home time; nothing else is as important. "Whenever I can I spend time with my family and friends at home. For me, that is simply the best, I enjoy every minute of it," he smiles. His girlfriend, Maria Francisca Perello is also from his hometown. The couple have been dating since 2006, but he won't talk about her. They apparently met when they were at school and given his outlook on life, it is hardly surprising he has picked a girl from his own backyard.

His secure background (despite his parents' divorce in 2009, which he has admitted affected him badly) helps him cope with the pressures of fame. "I don't really feel it too much, maybe because I come from Majorca and it's a quiet place. I go there as much as I can, but it's tough, I am travelling almost every week."

We speak shortly after his defeat at the hands of Federer at the ATP World Tour Finals in London. How upset was he about that? "Roger played great in London and there wasn't much I could do. I tried but I found the best Roger. But I wasn't really upset since I tried my best and gave all I had."

He says that losing in general still scares him. "At match point I get very nervous. In fact I am still nervous every time I go on court, because I am still scared of losing." He pauses and sighs. "Tennis is a terrible sport for that; one day you win but the next it is just like starting all over again. I suppose the one good thing about losing is that when you win you feel it more. Although I would prefer to win every time." He laughs, and comes across as an extremely affable and fairly easy-going young man. But he is a player who is famous for his mental strength and, despite his youth and congenial demeanour, I would definitely rather sit opposite him on a sofa than face him across a net. One gets the impression he is a rather different person on court.

But he is very much a star off court now too, despite his best efforts to deny it. His appearance in the Shakira video Gypsy, is compulsive viewing for more than just tennis fans. Soon he will join other sporting heroes David Beckham and Cristiano Ronaldo as the face of Armani Underwear and Armani Jeans for the Spring/Summer 2011 collection. One can only hope they find him a pair of underpants he won't be constantly adjusting. Does he enjoy this side of his career? "It's not that important to me," he says. "But I have done some things that have nothing to do with tennis but more as an experience in life."

Our time is up and I ask him if I can take his picture, obviously on the pretext that it is for my son. I inadvertently call him by his nickname, Rafa. I apologise. "That's fine," he laughs again. "Rafa works for me."

Both Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer will be playing at the Mubadala World Tennis Championship, which starts on Thursday in Abu Dhabi. Many consider their rivalry to be the greatest in tennis history.

The men have played each other 22 times, with Nadal winning 14 of their meetings. Seventeen of the matches have been tournament finals, including seven Grand Slam finals, of which Nadal has won five.

Their first match was in 2004, in the third round of the Miami Masters where Rafa (aged only 17 and then ranked 34 in the world) shocked everyone by beating Federer (who was then world No. 1) in straight sets. Their Wimbledon final in 2008 is generally regarded as one of the best tennis matches ever. It went on for four hours and 48 minutes, the longest-ever Wimbledon final. Nadal won the match and his first Wimbledon title by taking the fifth set 9-7.

At their last meeting, the ATP Word Tour Finals in London last month, Federer beat Nadal. Their next meeting could be here in Abu Dhabi. Tickets to the event, which sold out quickly last year, are on sale now at www.thinkflash.ae, or call 800-FLASH (35274).

RAFA ON ROGER "I am more than happy with my titles, and I think talk about if I am better or worse than Roger is stupid because the titles say he's much better than me, so that's the truth at that moment. I think that will be true all my life."

ROGER ON RAFA "It could get into my mind. I could start thinking, 'I can't play against this guy, his game doesn't suit me'. I could start accepting the fact that I have been losing against him, but that would be a bad thing for me to do."

The Nadal file

BORN: June 3, 1986, Manacor, Majorca, Spain. Still lives in Manacor

FAMILY: Mother Ana Maria Parera, father Sebastian Nadal and younger sister Maria Isabel

FIRST PICKED UP A TENNIS RACKET: When he was three years old; his uncle (and long-term coach) Toni was with him at the time and still is.

IS HE LEFT-HANDED? Only when he plays tennis. Uncle Toni converted him to a left-handed player, making him a more dangerous opponent.

NICKNAMES: The King of Clay, Rafa

BREAKTHROUGH: Came in 2002 when he won his first Association of Tennis Professionals match at just 15, making him only the ninth player to do so before the age of 16 in the open era. At the age of 19 years, one month and 22 days he became the third teenager in the history of the ATP computer rankings to reach the world No. 2 spot. The other two were Boris Becker and Björn Borg.

WHAT'S ALL THE TROPHY BITING ABOUT? Rafa started the biting habit as a teenager and it has now become one of his trademarks. He says he prefers biting trophies to kissing them.

DREAM MATCH: He would love to have played Borg. But he thinks the Swede would have won.

Source:

http://www.thenational.ae/sport/tenn...r-rafael-nadal
Eden is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 12-25-2010, 08:35 PM   #2092
country flag Yazoo.C
Registered User
 
Yazoo.C's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 729
Yazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: >> Rafa news and articles <<

Facebook:

Quote:
Rafael Nadal: Feliz Navidad!!! Merry Christmas!!!! Joyeux Noel!!!!
Yazoo.C is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2010, 03:11 PM   #2093
country flag star
Blown Out On the Trail
 
star's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 62,737
star has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: >> Rafa news and articles <<

Stevie Rafa



Spaniard won seven titles in 2010, including three straight majors to earn a career Golden Slam
Glyn Kirk / AFP/Getty Images
Quote:

Rafael Nadal compiled a 71-10 record with seven titles in 2010.

OPINION
BY STEVE TIGNOR

updated 12:41 p.m. ET Dec. 27, 2010
Everything was better in the past. The statement can’t be true, but somehow it makes us feel better to believe it. And few people like to believe it as much as tennis fans. Wood racquets, slice backhands, serve-and-volleyers, even the profane bad boys and patchy Wimbledon grass of the 1970s — we long for all of it.

But if there was ever a time to put nostalgia aside and focus on the here and now, this is it. The pro game, and in particular the men’s pro game, is in the midst of what might be called the Extraordinary Age. From winning streaks to Channel Slams to majors collected to aces hit to hours played: What seemed unimaginable a few years ago has become routine. Who would have believed at the start of the last decade, when there was little order at the top of the ATP tour rankings, that over the course of five years two men would win 21 of 23 majors and hold the No. 1 and 2 positions for longer than any other duo in history? That one of them would own a record 16 majors while the other would win a record 93 straight matches on clay? And that they would each have earned a career Grand Slam, something that had previously been accomplished by just five other men?

Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer have lifted the sport in unique and very different ways — Federer with his artistry and elegance, Nadal with his passion and athleticism. In 2010, the sense of the extraordinary that they’ve created became contagious. But it was two less-than-legendary figures who gave us the most mind-boggling day of the season. Three days, actually: That’s how long it took John Isner and Nicolas Mahut to play their second-round match at Wimbledon. The two slugged serves at each other for 11 hours, 5 minutes, and 183 games; the fifth set alone lasted longer than any match in history. Pity the Frenchman: Mahut won more points in one match than anyone ever has—502 to Isner’s 478—but still took a loss.
.
That indelible 11-hour moment aside, the story of 2010 was the resurgence and eventual dominance of Rafael Nadal. The Spaniard had finished the 2009 ATP season at a personal and professional low point. After enduring multiple injuries and family problems, he’d lost all six sets he played at the ATP World Tour Finals in London. By March of 2010, though, there were signs of life in his beat-up body; he reached the semifinals in both Indian Wells and Key Biscayne. The dam finally burst in May, on the clay of Monte Carlo, where he stampeded through the draw to win his first tournament in 11 months. After the final point, Nadal dropped to the court in tears. He had the winning feeling back, and he wouldn’t let it go.
From that point through the U.S. Open, Nadal put on one of the great sustained performances in tennis history. He reclaimed the French Open without dropping a set, made quick work of Tomas Berdych in the Wimbledon final, and, serving more effectively than ever, surrendered just one set on the way to his first U.S. Open title.


Few top players have remained as committed to improving as Nadal. The former dyed-in-the-wool dirt-baller has moved up in the court, made himself a credible volleyer, and turned his serve into a bail-out weapon. Yet the 24-year-old has also retained the fearsome desire and competitive intelligence that have defined him since he was a teenager. Is Nadal the next Federer?[ We certainly hope NOT!] It’s too early to say, of course, and if we’ve learned anything about their rivalry, it’s that whoever is being counted out is the person we should be watching.
For now, we’re watching Nadal. When asked about the future, the Spaniard’s characteristic reply is, “We gonna see, no?” We’re gonna see more Rafa, which is the best part of this story. The Extraordinary Age may just be getting started.
star is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2010, 05:02 PM   #2094
country flag Yazoo.C
Registered User
 
Yazoo.C's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 729
Yazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond reputeYazoo.C has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: >> Rafa news and articles <<

Rafa chosen as Spanish Athlete of the year

12 28 2010, Mallorca, Spain

Rafa Nadal wins 3 Grand Slams after suffering a knee injury – ‘Dedication, sportsmanship, hard work, will, humility, sacrifice, and discipline”, those are his values.

“I see a universal Spaniard”, said Julio Iglesias before triggering a huge round of applause. This beautiful phrase was spoken last Wednesday evening during a gala in Madrid at the ‘Palacio de Cibeles’, and it was referring to an incredible man, Rafa Nadal.

The Spanish tennis player won Roland Garros, Wimbledon and the US Open in 2010. He re-claimed the No.1 ranking and at 24, he became the youngest tennis player ever to win all Grand Slams. When we asked fellow sportsmen who they thought was the ‘Spaniard of the year’, they all chose Rafa Nadal.

During the last couple of weeks alone he has been honored by the BBC, and the ATP. But the interesting thing is, all of that success and accolades, all those celebrations and praise only cover a small percentage of his persona, the athlete. What truly makes Rafa and amazing man is what he does when he’s not winning, when his life has turned ugly.

During Julio Iglesias’ speech, at the gala organized by the Rafa Nadal foundation, a beautiful video of the world No.1 was showcased in huge screens for the evening’s special guests. From politicians, to fashion icons, sport stars and celebrities, they all stared intensely at the screen as the footage rarely showed Rafa’s victories, but instead, it focused on the challenges he has had to endure during his career. Multiple injuries, his quarterfinal loss against Robin Soderling at Roland Garros, his quarterfinal withdrawal at the 2010 Australian Open when he was playing against Andy Murray, the times when everything around him was full of doubts and no one believed he could win again.

Then it all turned into silence as the following words appeared; ‘Dedication, sportsmanship, hard work, will, humility, sacrifice, and discipline”. - True success doesn’t come from winning.
That was the message Rafa wanted to send.

Success comes from your values. They have helped him overcome his most difficult adversities and have played a key role in building a legendary career. Success, the world No.1 explained, doesn’t come in the shape of trophies; it comes from taking chances.

Behind each and every one of his biggest victories there has been a philosophical approach. The day he won his first Grand Slam (Roland Garros), instead of letting his new found fame and tennis status get to his head, he followed his coach (and uncle) Toni Nadal’s advice to practice first thing in the morning to go over everything he had done wrong and needed to improve.

From an early age, Rafa has been taught the art of appreciation, hard work, and humility. His coach and family have always reminded him that being good at playing tennis doesn’t make him a hero. “No, that is a term reserved for those who risk their lives in order to save others,” Uncle Toni once said. “Just because he can hit a yellow fluffy ball over a net well doesn’t make him any better than anyone else,” and he knows that.

It is perhaps that kind of upbringing that has allowed him to value the unique opportunity he has to help change other people’s lives. In 2009, Luzzi, an Italian player died of leukemia. “I spoke to Rafa”, said Paula, his mother. “about how we could help sick people like my son get looked after from home instead of the hospital.” “He kindly used his image to support the Foundation, donated one of his racquets for auction, and made a monetary contribution”. That’s where he started, and not long ago he opened up a school in Anantapur (India).

He has a huge challenge ahead of him in a few weeks, if he wins the Australian Open, he will become the first man since Rod Laver in 1969 to win all four Grand Slams in a row. But when talking to him, it’s clear the ‘Rafa Slam’ is not where his mind is. Right now, his goal is to continue his mission to teach others the values that have helped him become who he is today.

Written by JUAN JOSÉ MATEO from elpais.com
http://www.rafaelnadal.com/content/r...h-athlete-year

________________________________________

Yazoo.C is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2011, 09:01 PM   #2095
country flag FormerRafaFan
Registered User
 
FormerRafaFan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Oslo
Posts: 7,014
FormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: >> Rafa news and articles <<

A new article about Rafa in a Norwegian newspaper today.

http://www.vg.no/sport/artikkel.php?artid=10013047

My translation, not very good though:

"Rafael Nadal testing his health"

Rafael Nadal is testing his health and trying to get rid of a cold and flu in rain heavy Melbourne this week.

He was beaten by Nikolaj Davydenko in the semi final in Qatar Open last week, but he was then struggling with fever and was far from his best form. The sickness made him postpone his departure for Melbourne, where he focuses very hard to win Australian Open later in January.

The sickness has made many doubt the fact that 24 year old Nadal can play seven tough matches in Melbourne in a week - in a tournament which often gets pretty heated.

He was struggling in the rain in the practice he did Tuesday and he didn't get more than half and hour on court before he retired.

Rafael Nadal won French Open, Wimbledon and US Open last year. Now he's hoping for a victory in Australian Open too in the end of this month, because his goal is to be the first player since Rod Laver in 1969 to have all the four Grand Slam titles in a row.
__________________
DELPO

Also supporting known chokers Verdasco, Lopez and Monaco

Quote:
Originally Posted by rubbERR View Post
Verdasco was their cheerleader, number one mascot.
They let him play tennis once after they saw his "consistency is everything" advertisement.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JarkaFish View Post
Joke thread? Kohlschreiber clowns this servebot in 3.
Maybe 4 or 5 if he wants to get more of a workout in.
FormerRafaFan is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 01-12-2011, 11:24 PM   #2096
Nobody's Perfecc
Registered User
 
Join Date: Oct 2003
Posts: 161
Nobody's Perfecc has a reputation beyond reputeNobody's Perfecc has a reputation beyond reputeNobody's Perfecc has a reputation beyond reputeNobody's Perfecc has a reputation beyond reputeNobody's Perfecc has a reputation beyond reputeNobody's Perfecc has a reputation beyond reputeNobody's Perfecc has a reputation beyond reputeNobody's Perfecc has a reputation beyond reputeNobody's Perfecc has a reputation beyond reputeNobody's Perfecc has a reputation beyond reputeNobody's Perfecc has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: >> Rafa news and articles <<

Did Rafa really practice in the rain? Is he trying to get sick again?
Nobody's Perfecc is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2011, 08:42 PM   #2097
country flag FormerRafaFan
Registered User
 
FormerRafaFan's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2010
Location: Oslo
Posts: 7,014
FormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond reputeFormerRafaFan has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: >> Rafa news and articles <<

Quote:
Originally Posted by Nobody's Perfecc View Post
Did Rafa really practice in the rain? Is he trying to get sick again?
Yeah, he did. At least according to this article.

I'm with you.. I'm not sure if it was a good idea, after having the flu and all..
__________________
DELPO

Also supporting known chokers Verdasco, Lopez and Monaco

Quote:
Originally Posted by rubbERR View Post
Verdasco was their cheerleader, number one mascot.
They let him play tennis once after they saw his "consistency is everything" advertisement.
Quote:
Originally Posted by JarkaFish View Post
Joke thread? Kohlschreiber clowns this servebot in 3.
Maybe 4 or 5 if he wants to get more of a workout in.
FormerRafaFan is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2011, 04:24 PM   #2098
country flag star
Blown Out On the Trail
 
star's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 62,737
star has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: >> Rafa news and articles <<

Here we go! Fighting words from the Sydney Morning Herald.

Quote:
Nadal grand slam would trump Laver's
Mark Hodgkinson
January 17, 2011



MOST people old enough to remember 1969 will think only of the moon landings, Richard Nixon moving into the White House and the Woodstock hippies, but those with an interest in tennis will recall that was the year Rod Laver won all four of the grand slam tournaments.

Conspiracy theorists would have it that the landings were faked in a Hollywood studio, everyone knows what happened to Nixon, and unlike an ageing hippie, Laver's accomplishment looks better with every passing year.

In the next fortnight at the Australian Open's Melbourne Park, Rafael Nadal has the opportunity to become the first man in 42 years to hold all four majors simultaneously.


It would not be a calendar-year grand slam like Laver's but it would be a greater feat and the finest achievement in the history of the men's game.


When Laver won his grand slam in 1969 and previously in 1962, the sport was still very much lawn tennis. Three of the four championships were played on grass; the claycourt French Open was the only exception.

Nadal's generation competes on three different surfaces: turf, clay and hardcourts. Make that four different surfaces - the fast, skiddy concrete of the US Open is not the same as the slower, higher-bouncing courts of Melbourne.

This is also a much more brutal and competitive sport than it was in Laver's era. The physical and technical demands now are greater than they were when the tennis balls were coated in white felt and trees were chopped down to make rackets.

It took a while after tennis began its open, professional era in 1968 for the culture of the sport to change, so there still would have been an amateur ethos when Laver went around the grand slam block a second time.

Many more countries now produce players for the slams, to the detriment of the grand slam nations. Plus, Nadal shares an era with Roger Federer, widely regarded as the greatest talent of all time.


The aim here is not to disparage anything Laver achieved but to argue that Nadal is just seven matches away from something even more special.

"It wouldn't be a grand slam but it would be the greatest achievement I've seen in tennis," Andy Murray's former coach, Brad Gilbert, has said.

Although Nadal's preparations have been complicated by flu-like symptoms, it sounds as though he has been feeling sharper with every practice session. Nadal, the champion here a couple of years ago when he beat Federer in the final, opens this time against Brazil's Marcos Daniel.

It seems as though Nadal has to ensure he is mentally primed too. In the off-season, he told a Spanish radio station: "It's a bit scary to think that if I win in Australia I would close the circle of four grand slams in a row."



Apart from Laver, the only man to have held all four slams simultaneously was America's Don Budge, who did so in 1938. Twice Federer came within one match of winning the non-calendar year grand slam but both times, in the 2006 and 2007 French Opens, Nadal beat him. Now Federer will be left without a slam in his possession if he does not retain the Norman Brookes Challenge Cup. For many neutrals, the ultimate would be for Nadal to play Federer for the title, with the Rafa Slam on the line.
star is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 01-16-2011, 04:33 PM   #2099
country flag star
Blown Out On the Trail
 
star's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 62,737
star has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond reputestar has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: >> Rafa news and articles <<

Nadal fights fever shifting from weak to meek as he brushes off buzz of grand slam quadrella

Linda Pearce
January 16, 2011

By the end of a busy afternoon doing the media rounds, Rafael Nadal had lost count. Among the reporters in the main interview room, and then as he shuffled around on the sunny-at-last roof of the TV tower, the theme recurred. Questions about the Rafa Slam.

A true grand slam, of course, comprises victory in all four major championships within a calendar year. A career grand slam is winning all of the four at least once, Nadal having completed his set at the US Open last September. A golden slam (refer Steffi Graf), includes Olympic singles success. Four consecutive majors carried over two seasons was, most recently, a Serena (Williams) Slam. It could next be Nadal's.


Yesterday, he was asked about little else; that, and the fever that flattened him in Doha last week and from which he is gradually recovering before his opening round against Brazilian Marcos Daniel. Never mind Nadal's futile protests that it is not the prospect of the quadrella that motivates him, but simply a good run in the next race.

When the 24-year-old eventually sat down with The Sun-Herald, we requested an estimate of how many times in the previous hour he'd been asked about the Rafa Slam. ''I don't know how many interviews I did, but in every one,'' he said.

Nadal acknowledges the inevitable, understands the interest. Every tournament needs a focus and, here, this appears to be it. The Spaniard's great rival Roger Federer was twice thwarted at the final hurdle - at the French Open, by Nadal, of course - when he owned Wimbledon and the US Open from one season and the Australian title from the next. Nadal insists, with typical modesty, that he believes this is the one chance he will ever get.

Indeed, it would be a Rafa record that Roger has not held before him. Then again, since Australian great Rod Laver achieved the second of his calendar year slams in 1969, it is something no man has managed.

''Seriously, I can't imagine,'' Nadal said. ''I can't imagine this now. I know how difficult it is winning a grand slam and I won the last three so it's almost impossible to win four in a row.''

Twelve months ago, in his last appearance at the Australian Open, chronic knee issues prevented Nadal from completing his quarter-final against Andy Murray. Those were troubling times, for he had been unable to defend his Wimbledon title in 2009 and, amid considerable personal turmoil, had worked so hard to return.

''Seriously, I never imagined at that moment I'm gonna win the next three grand slams and I'm going to win a few more tournaments, so it was an amazing year for me, unforgettable year, very emotional because I came back after a difficult time,'' he said.

''For sure I have my doubts. The truth is I worked a lot to be back at my best, but I didn't come back to my best, I played better than that, so that forgives a lot of satisfaction, to come back after a difficult situation. But that's 2010. That's past, now we are in 2011 and we start from zero another time.''

In Melbourne, he likes to walk around town and mingle with the locals. At home in Majorca, he fishes, plays golf (he plays off an eight handicap) and plays football with his many cousins.

Here, it is all about the tennis, and working with his uncle and lifelong coach, Toni. Together, the pair tweaked Nadal's serve for a valuable pay-off at the US Open, adding pace through a slight change of grip. It was, the world No.1 thinks, decisive in annexing his ninth grand slam singles title, and only his second on hardcourts after the memorable Australian triumph of 2009 . ''It worked unbelievable. So we will see what's going on here.''

So we will. Nadal is feeling better ''but not perfect, yet'', more tired and sweatier than usual as he overcomes his illness. If the limited off-season means he is not exactly rested, then it must surely seem a long time since he has lost at a slam?

''No,'' he protests. ''It's always very close. And it's something that's is always here because you always lose. Tennis you can't draw, so every week only one player will win, so it's a sport you are always losing.''

Which may sound pessimistic, but Nadal remains a humble champion. When Federer was asked what skill he would pinch from Nadal, Federer said his ability to slide on clay. Nadal was asked the same.

''I will take almost everything from him, because he is the more complete player in the world, and probably the more complete player of history,'' said a player who, however reluctant he may be to talk about it, could soon make a little history of his own.


http://www.smh.com.au/sport/tennis/n...115-19s3z.html
star is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Old 01-29-2011, 05:39 PM   #2100
country flag born_on_clay
Registered User
 
born_on_clay's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jun 2008
Posts: 11,690
born_on_clay has a reputation beyond reputeborn_on_clay has a reputation beyond reputeborn_on_clay has a reputation beyond reputeborn_on_clay has a reputation beyond reputeborn_on_clay has a reputation beyond reputeborn_on_clay has a reputation beyond reputeborn_on_clay has a reputation beyond reputeborn_on_clay has a reputation beyond reputeborn_on_clay has a reputation beyond reputeborn_on_clay has a reputation beyond reputeborn_on_clay has a reputation beyond repute
Default Re: >> Rafa news and articles <<

News about Rafa's injury:
http://www.heraldsun.com.au/sport/au...-1225995719044
__________________
Rafael Nadal
CAREER GOLDEN GRAND SLAM
♔♔♔♔♔♔♔♔♔♔♔♔♔
64 Titles | 27 Masters 1000 |Olympic Games Singles Gold Medalist | 139 Weeks at no.1
3 year end no.1 | 4 Davis Cups | 699 singles match wins
born_on_clay is offline View My Blog!   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


Copyright (C) Verticalscope Inc
Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
vBCredits v1.4 Copyright ©2007, PixelFX Studios