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Old 06-30-2010, 11:14 AM   #1081
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Wimbledon Second Round

R Federer
Wednesday, 23 June 2010

Q. Are you aware that the longest tennis match is going on right now?

ROGER FEDERER: I am aware, yes. I'd be a fool if I wouldn't know.

Q. Having that in mind, do you think it does make some sense to have a fifth set tiebreak like the US Open?

ROGER FEDERER: I think it's perfect the way it is. It's unfortunate these guys are going to be a little bit tired tomorrow and the next day and the next week and the next month. I've been following this as closely as I could. I walked on court at about 11 All in the fifth. They're still going. This is absolutely amazing, yeah.

I mean, in a way, I wish I was them, in some ways I wish I wasn't them. So this is a very special match. I hope somehow this is going to end. I don't know. They'll be fresh again tomorrow, I guess. If they have to come back, it's unbelievable. I don't know what to say.

Q. Were you surprised a guy ranked 152 in the world could play that well?

ROGER FEDERER: No, not really, because I do practice a lot with juniors and lower ranked players and doubles players who don't have much of a singles ranking anymore. These guys are tough. You know, they can all hit a good ball. Are professionals, as well, do the right things.

So maybe they can't produce it over an entire tournament, but especially on grass they can produce it on any given day.

It's a good match for me to come out. I thought Bozoljac played great. He served amazing. It's hard to get a read on his serve. He served clutch when he needed to. He was able to really play very dangerously also on the returns, even though I was never broken, which is a good thing for me. This easily could have gone five sets. Also could have gone straight sets, so obviously I'll take the four sets any day.

Q. This Isner/Mahut match, does it give reason for a fifth set tiebreaker?

ROGER FEDERER: No. I answered already. I love this. I know they're maybe not loving this, but I guess this is unheard of in our game. I mean, normally there are breaks in tennis matches.
John is barely moving anymore, but he's still able to produce good serves when he has to. It's so impressive to see. I mean, I was watching this. I don't know if I was crying or laughing. It was too much.

Q. Is this a match that's reduced to a battle of wills rather than tennis ability?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't know. I guess once you get to the point of 10 All, 20 All, you don't doubt anymore. You just go point by point. You hope not to be down Love 30. If it happens, you concentrate a bit extra.

But I guess in some ways you're also relaxed, you know. You just say, You know, whatever happens happens. When it gets important, you try to focus. Like this, you don't have that extra pressure and tension in your body. Maybe that's why these guys can do it for so long and so good.

I heard Mahut only had three breakpoints so far in the entire match. I mean, this is unbelievable. They've played I think over nine hours. The stats on the serves I don't even know about because they must be ridiculous, incredibly good.

So, I don't know, you just go with the flow. Obviously once it's 50 All, you're like, I don't want to lose this match anymore after putting in a heroic effort already. Unfortunately there's going to be a loser. But I think both will come out as winners, that's for sure.

Q. Can you relate that to yourself when you played in the final last year?

ROGER FEDERER: I can relate to this in some little degree. This is beyond anything.

Q. There's been talk about the grass slowing down. When you see those two guys, they've combined for 175 aces. Not a lot of returns are getting back in play. Maybe it shows that the court is at the right speed?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I still think, you know, it's a touch too slow. Indoors I think our game has slowed down drastically. But I definitely think the bounces are nice and high here at Wimbledon. I think the bounces were lower. If the bounces are lower, it makes it much faster to play on.

But, you know, it's the way it is. Today I think it's particularly quick. I felt it also on my serve and on Bozoljac's serve. If you do hit your spots, the ball travels through the air very quickly. Once you try to find the right spots, you don't have to take the chances anymore like in the beginning.

You have the opponent guessing, your first serve percentage goes up. Next thing you know you're serving at 70%, not as high a risk, because the air is doing the work for you. The court was fast, too, because it's hard and quick today.

But it's not always like that. I still wish it was faster, but I'm not complaining. I've played fantastic here over the years obviously in these conditions.

Q. The final point when you were standing at the net waiting for Hawk Eye, what did you exchange with him? Everyone in Serbia wants to know.

ROGER FEDERER: They're debating already?

Q. Yes. They're proud of him.

ROGER FEDERER: I asked him what kind of drink he wants later on in the bar. No. (Laughter).

I said, I think the ball is out, really. Anyway, I hope so. He goes, If it is out, I wish you all the best. Please keep on winning and stuff. It's like, Okay, we'll see. Wait for the call first, you know. But he was very nice. He was very supportive of me going on and playing very well in the next few rounds.

He seems like a very nice guy. I've played him once in doubles in Davis Cup. He comes across as a very open and kind of cool guy. So it was kind of an unconventional finish, but he was a very nice guy at the net.

Q. Is it strange to drop three sets in the opening two games for you? You wouldn't have been expected to.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, but I won six sets, you know, so... Kind of works. You got to win the right sets.

But sure, you know, I think the first two matches have been tough. My opponents, I think they did play very well. Today was obviously very different. We hardly had any rallies, whereas in the first match it was played out on the baseline points really.

So, I mean, I'm happy with the way I'm feeling today. I'm coming off a five setter. It's never easy. I mean, this is hard. Still, five sets pressure, everything builds up. I was behind almost the entire match in the first round. So I came out feeling actually good. I'm excited that I'm still in the tournament. Looking forward to my third round, regardless how I got there.

Q. Do you think you have improved from your last match to this match?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't know. I mean, it's completely different opponent. You know, the other guy, he served lefty, 105 miles average probably on the first serve. Here we have a guy serving 135 the whole match. You can't compare these kind of matches.

That's what I meant. It's kind of tough that every player plays tough. But it's also good. It makes it interesting. You have to adapt. Today was a matter of staying calm, waiting for high chance, and hopefully come up with some good shots when I had to.

It was hard, because I thought Bozoljac played very well, which also means I think I did very well today.
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Old 06-30-2010, 11:16 AM   #1082
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Wimbledon - Third Round
R Federer
Friday, 25 June 2010
Q. Was it a relief to get an easy match after the first two rounds that were much more difficult?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, yeah, to some degree, yes. I knew I had more of an active role today in my match, you know, that Clément was only going to allow me to play a bit more. He has different assets than the last opponent.

I knew it could be somewhat like in the first round. I've played him on numerous occasions, also on grass before, so I know how he plays. I've been successful the last few times we've played.

So it's the kind of guy I didn't like to play against. Today I don't mind it, so I'm happy with the score line.

Q. I don't believe you played Melzer before. Probably one of the only guys in that age bracket that you haven't faced. What do you look for in a match where you haven't seen him face to face?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, we know each other very well, back from the juniors. We played doubles back at the Orange Bowl probably like in '97 or '96. So we go way back.

It's funny because I've practiced with him, you know, chat with him every day in the locker rooms. But it's one of the guys I never faced. And he's my age, so it's an interesting matchup. Usually we always play the same tournaments as well because he's Austrian, I'm Swiss.

We tend to have similar schedules, but we never met. Kind of cool we finally get a chance to play each other, especially here at Wimbledon, which I think is one of his best surfaces on grass, and he's coming off of a great French Open.

I'll definitely be in for a tough match. He's improved again. He's making a move, a push in his ranking. My job is to try to stop that a little bit.

Q. It's still the first week of Wimbledon. You've had some tough matches, so has Roddick, Nadal, Djokovic. Do you think the depth in the game is the highest it's ever been in men's tennis?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I mean, I think there's always been big depth, you know, the last years. Just this year it seems like ‑‑ I mean, no major upsets yet but tough matches for everyone. And touch matches don't mean that there's a decline in form.

I think you always also have to respect the guy who put in a great effort and a good match. There's many guys that did that against top guys. Unfortunately for them, they weren't really able to break through and make the upset they were hoping for.

But it's good for the tournament the top guys are still going. Interesting with obviously a week ahead of us now.

Q. Was that your best performance, the performance you were happiest with so far today?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, I guess so. Even though last round's match was hard to judge because there was more just serving, bombing, returning, reacting. Not much you could really do in the outcome, whereas in the first match, obviously I was four sets in trouble and only in the fifth set could I finally start to play a bit of normal tennis.

So obviously, this felt much better. Right off the bat I got the early break. Same thing in the second set. From then on, it was a race to the finish line. So it was a good and solid match for me, clean, hardly any errors, good on the offensive. So I'm very happy with my game right now.

Q. You've been to a lot of special events. Anything at all surprising about your experience with the Queen? What did you enjoy the most about it?

ROGER FEDERER: Just enjoyed sitting right next to her at lunch really and getting a chance to know what kind of a person she is, because you hear a lot obviously about people of her status.

It was nice. She was very friendly, very relaxed. You could tell she's done this a million times, you know. She made everybody feel very special at the table, one of those things you'll never forget, and be able to tell to your kids or someone down the line.

Q. Did she have any sensibility at all towards our sport in terms of references or knowledge?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, she knew about my tough first round. She knew she was going to watch Andy obviously at 1 p.m. She knew about the Isner‑Mahut match. She also was very excited to be back at Wimbledon finally, that her schedule allowed it, because usually she said she was in Scotland during this time. We were all very thrilled she finally made it.

Q. What did she mention about your first round and about Isner?

ROGER FEDERER: She said I should hit more backhand down the line (laughter).

No, she didn't go into details.

Q. Given the choice from a fan's perspective, would you take Monday at Wimbledon or Saturday at the US Open, the second Saturday?

ROGER FEDERER: In terms of?

Q. If you were a fan and you had a ticket and you had to choose between one of those two days.

ROGER FEDERER: You'd do both, you know. Go to one first and the other one in September.

No, I think even the middle Saturday ‑‑ is it Labor Day weekend? I think it's great.

Q. It's a three‑day weekend.

ROGER FEDERER: Those days are great as well at the Open. There's obviously something, a myth about opening Monday here. Obviously, the importance of the match is almost maybe greater at the US Open if you're talking about that middle weekend, the final weekend at the Open. Atmospheres are very different.

Honestly I was joking before. But I still think if you're a diehard fan, you should do both. It's really that great.

Q. Switzerland is playing right now.

ROGER FEDERER: Are they already?

Q. I think so, yes.

ROGER FEDERER: So I should go (smiling). It's a good point. I hope they're winning. I hope this is worth it, what I'm doing right now.

Q. As someone who has won many career‑defining matches, what advice can you give to the England football team for Sunday?

ROGER FEDERER: The better the opponent is, the better you play yourself. It's very simple sometimes. There's nothing much you have to do. Against weaker players or weaker teams, respectful obviously, you tend to have options. You tend to pick the wrong ones.

Against the better players, you only have one option and then you play better. I think that's what's gonna happen with the England‑Germany match, as well.
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Old 06-30-2010, 11:18 AM   #1083
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Wimbledon Fourth Round
R. Federer
Monday, 28 June 2010
R Federer Interview - 28 June
Q. Are you a fan of this Monday at Wimbledon where all the singles players are on show?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, yeah. I mean, it's great to be part of it when you make it to the second week, first of all. Secondly, I think it's wonderful for the fans. I always say for fans the best days are like quarterfinal day or last 16s, because then you usually have the big names but you still have enough matches to go look at, not only just on the big courts but also on the grounds. The juniors are also playing.

I mean, I think this is a wonderful day for the fans.

Q. How do you feel you played today?

ROGER FEDERER: I thought I played great. Aggressive right from the start, which I think was key today because I knew Melzer was going to try ‑‑ every chance he was going to get, he was going to hit the ball and come forward as well. You want to counter that and play aggressive yourself. I was able to do that very well today.

Q. Do you feel you can intimidate opponents on this Centre Court because you know it so well?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't play that trick. Honestly, I don't even know how it works. So I just try to play a good match, you know.

I know Jurgen too well to play tricks with him. I always say, you know, if you're not good enough and you have to use stuff like that, then you have issues. So I always say, Try to play your best, and if it's enough, that's great; otherwise you have to go to the practice courts and work harder and get better.

Crowds are wonderful here. Obviously I know every corner of this Centre Court. It helps. I've got the experience from playing so many big matches here. I don't obviously get too overexcited about a match like this. But I also have nerves going into a match like this. It's a guy I never played before. He's a good friend of mine. You don't want to lose.

Q. Any concerns about fitness at all? There was a photograph with some strapping on your thigh the other day. Is that just precaution?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, it was after my first‑round match. MY thigh was hurting a little bit, which already was the case in Halle. In the finals it was hurting me as well.

But honestly now I have no more problems, no more strapping. I'm happy I recovered that.

Q. How does the hot and dry weather change the conditions of the courts?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, this is not hot. This is normal to me anyway. Maybe for England, I don't know. For Switzerland, as well. But we're used to playing in 35, 40 degrees sometimes. This is moderate. Very comfortable to play in. This is kind of a one‑shirt‑change kind of match. That's rather easy.

But, no, obviously when it's nice and warm like this, it travels through the air a little bit. Also maybe glides through the grass a bit more. Then again, I think the difference is more from opening Monday to, you know, second week Monday, the court plays different. You can move better, I have the feeling, because it's not as slippery because the grass almost is gone.

It becomes a bit more of a hard court kind of a feel under your shoes. You get more grip, in my opinion. I think that's a bigger change than actually the weather.

Q. How have slower courts and the heavier tennis balls contributed to the decline of the serve‑and‑volley game in your estimation?

ROGER FEDERER: It's tough to say. I obviously came here in the year when I played Sampras, let's say, I was serve and volleying 80% of the first serve, 50% on the second serve.

I remember once speaking to Wayne Ferreira who I was playing doubles with that year actually. He said he used to serve and volley always first serve, 50% of the second serve. And towards the end of his career at Wimbledon, he used to serve and volley 50% of his first serve and not anymore on his second serve.

You wonder, how in the world has that happened? Have we become such incredible return players or can we not volley anymore or is it just a combination of slower balls, slower courts?

I think it's definitely a bit of a combination of many things. If I look back, I think we definitely had many more great volley players in the game back then. When you do have that, you are forced to move in, as well, because you don't want to hit passing shots against a great volleyer over and over again. But because we don't have that as much anymore, everybody's content staying at the baseline.

A bit unfortunate, I think, because I love guys moving in, like a Melzer match today who throws in the occasional serve and volley. You have to throw in great passing shots. It's unfortunate for the games. Unfortunately, they've slowed down everything, indoors, grass. Everything has become so slow, I think that is a bit of a pity.

Q. What have you missed by having that contrast like Sampras and Agassi?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I used to, thank God, still play in that era where I played against serve‑and‑volley players, chip‑and‑charge guys. It was a completely different game plan. Mindset you felt pressure the whole match because you knew it doesn't matter what surface on a couple of shots here and there. You don't get that feeling anymore as much.

Q. Yesterday this country and the sports world were shocked by some problematic officiating, and there were very loud calls for electronic officiating. Could you talk about how electronic officiating has evolved in our sport and would you call for it in soccer, especially at the goal line?

ROGER FEDERER: Have to be careful. Who is the head of the FIFA? I don't remember. Is he a Swiss guy by any chance (smiling)?

We have, what is it, electronic line calling even though we don't need it. We all know we don't, but we do have it. They should have it, and they don't. So it's a choice the guys have to make at the top, you know.

I do struggle a little bit with soccer at the time because there's so many mistakes from umpires. Don't blame them. They're so far away sometimes from what's happening, and then also so many goals are disallowed that are goals and others are not counted that would be goals. It's frustrating as a fan.

You just hope that all those things go for you when you're like in this kind of a stage of a tournament. They could have been sent home just because of that single mistake, and it's incredible.

I think it's rough, you know. To me it seems like it's just crying for a change, a bit.

Q. In our sport you feel it is best just to leave it in the hands of the linesmen and the chair umpire?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you have to understand, one forehand down the line doesn't change the outcome of the match; whereas one goal changes the entire mindset of a team, of a strategy. You know, you can play defense after that.

Tennis, we don't have that. Guys are sitting there, not moving. They're only staring at the line. It's so much more simple. It's going to even out throughout a career or a season, the good and bad calls.

Whereas goals, I mean, it's such a huge impact in those 90 minutes. It changes everything. That's why they have it in American football, right? They have challenges you can do. I mean, there's so many ways of trying to adjust the system.

Q. You came out missing a few first serves. How do you work on that as the match goes on?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you look for your rhythm, try to make sure you get the right rhythm going. Well, then maybe you start finding the T serves; then you look for the wide serves. But everything happens very quickly. That's why I'm very happy I can rely on a good second serve. I think I won 70% on my second serve today. That was another key on winning the match in straight.

Q. Did it hurt at all to dismantle Melzer so easily and give him quite a beating since he's your friend?

ROGER FEDERER: No, that's just tennis. That's a tennis match. It's no more than that. He even said right after, the match was over at the end, he hopes he doesn't have to wait another 10 years to play me. He was not frustrated.

He was hoping for a second match right after the match was over. That's the kind of guy is. It's wonderful playing on Centre Court. He knows wherever he plays me around the world, it's most likely going to be Centre Court.

I think our games match up well. He probably likes my style of playing, moving forward, not giving him too much chances. I feel the same from his game as well. I think we would match up well if we play together more often.
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Old 06-30-2010, 04:03 PM   #1084
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Default Re: Roger news and articles

Roger, I know you are strong man, you will fight back!!!

GOD Bless you get healthy soon and have a happy hloidays!!
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Old 07-01-2010, 04:34 PM   #1085
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The Day After July 01, 2010 (6:47 A.M.)
We've been here before: Roger Federer loses a match, and suddenly the world has changed. The reality is, tennis has been changing for a while now. Here's another fact: The Federer Era is over.

Before you close your fists and wind up, let me step back. I'm not talking about the end of Federer as a Grand Slam champion. My guess is we'll see him lift another trophy or two before he retires. He's going to play for at least another two or three years, perhaps longer if he maintains his health. But the days of domination are gone. It's one thing for Federer to lose at the U.S. Open or the French Open. But at Wimbledon, where Federer had been nearly unbeatable for eight years? To someone other than Rafael Nadal? When that happened, we always knew, it would be proof that the greatest player of all time had moved into the next stage of his tennis life.

Federer seemed to feel this yesterday, as my colleague Peter Bodo points out in his fine post-match post. That's why I'm willing to give Federer a pass on his uncharacteristic complaining. For anyone who has watched Federer over the years, the quickness with which he alluded to injuries, unprompted, was striking. The remarks revealed one thing: The man was hurting. Every Wimbledon champion knows that his or her time will run out one day. But when it happens, it's a surprise, and painful.

Everyone could see this, and that's why Berdych wouldn't scold Federer (if another opponent had done this, Berdych might have). Here's Berdych: "I don't know if he just looking for some excuses after the match or something like that. I mean, it happened to all of us."

After the match, I ran into Jurgen Melzer, a veteran who lost Federer in the fourth round. He had sympathy.

"Roger is never somebody who comes up with an excuse for losing," Melzer said. "He takes it like a man. If he was hurt, he was hurt."

No doubt he was. Most of the pain was emotional, which is all the more reason to take no offense from his words.
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Old 07-02-2010, 02:31 AM   #1086
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Default Re: Roger news and articles

Quote:
Originally Posted by didadida View Post
The Day After July 01, 2010 (6:47 A.M.)
We've been here before: Roger Federer loses a match, and suddenly the world has changed. The reality is, tennis has been changing for a while now. Here's another fact: The Federer Era is over.

Before you close your fists and wind up, let me step back. I'm not talking about the end of Federer as a Grand Slam champion. My guess is we'll see him lift another trophy or two before he retires. He's going to play for at least another two or three years, perhaps longer if he maintains his health. But the days of domination are gone. It's one thing for Federer to lose at the U.S. Open or the French Open. But at Wimbledon, where Federer had been nearly unbeatable for eight years? To someone other than Rafael Nadal? When that happened, we always knew, it would be proof that the greatest player of all time had moved into the next stage of his tennis life.

Federer seemed to feel this yesterday, as my colleague Peter Bodo points out in his fine post-match post. That's why I'm willing to give Federer a pass on his uncharacteristic complaining. For anyone who has watched Federer over the years, the quickness with which he alluded to injuries, unprompted, was striking. The remarks revealed one thing: The man was hurting. Every Wimbledon champion knows that his or her time will run out one day. But when it happens, it's a surprise, and painful.

Everyone could see this, and that's why Berdych wouldn't scold Federer (if another opponent had done this, Berdych might have). Here's Berdych: "I don't know if he just looking for some excuses after the match or something like that. I mean, it happened to all of us."

After the match, I ran into Jurgen Melzer, a veteran who lost Federer in the fourth round. He had sympathy.

"Roger is never somebody who comes up with an excuse for losing," Melzer said. "He takes it like a man. If he was hurt, he was hurt."

No doubt he was. Most of the pain was emotional, which is all the more reason to take no offense from his words.
Beautifully said. Warm, empathetic, and suportive.

You set a very high standard for both quality of writing and content. Thank you, didadida.
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Old 07-02-2010, 05:58 AM   #1087
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Default Re: Roger news and articles

Quote:
Originally Posted by didadida View Post
The Day After July 01, 2010 (6:47 A.M.)
We've been here before: Roger Federer loses a match, and suddenly the world has changed. The reality is, tennis has been changing for a while now. Here's another fact: The Federer Era is over.

Before you close your fists and wind up, let me step back. I'm not talking about the end of Federer as a Grand Slam champion. My guess is we'll see him lift another trophy or two before he retires. He's going to play for at least another two or three years, perhaps longer if he maintains his health. But the days of domination are gone. It's one thing for Federer to lose at the U.S. Open or the French Open. But at Wimbledon, where Federer had been nearly unbeatable for eight years? To someone other than Rafael Nadal? When that happened, we always knew, it would be proof that the greatest player of all time had moved into the next stage of his tennis life.

Federer seemed to feel this yesterday, as my colleague Peter Bodo points out in his fine post-match post. That's why I'm willing to give Federer a pass on his uncharacteristic complaining. For anyone who has watched Federer over the years, the quickness with which he alluded to injuries, unprompted, was striking. The remarks revealed one thing: The man was hurting. Every Wimbledon champion knows that his or her time will run out one day. But when it happens, it's a surprise, and painful.

Everyone could see this, and that's why Berdych wouldn't scold Federer (if another opponent had done this, Berdych might have). Here's Berdych: "I don't know if he just looking for some excuses after the match or something like that. I mean, it happened to all of us."

After the match, I ran into Jurgen Melzer, a veteran who lost Federer in the fourth round. He had sympathy.

"Roger is never somebody who comes up with an excuse for losing," Melzer said. "He takes it like a man. If he was hurt, he was hurt."

No doubt he was. Most of the pain was emotional, which is all the more reason to take no offense from his words.

yep, that's our Rog, he tells it like it is, kinda like Safin. and Berdych, never liked the guy, but reading his presser, yuk, now i really don't like him.
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Old 07-02-2010, 09:35 AM   #1088
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yep, that's our Rog, he tells it like it is, kinda like Safin. and Berdych, never liked the guy, but reading his presser, yuk, now i really don't like him.
What a bunch of patronizing BS though. And re-spinning Melzer's words to mean Roger's pain was emotional, not physical. I'm pretty sure that's not what Melzer meant.
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Old 07-02-2010, 01:38 PM   #1089
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What a bunch of patronizing BS though. And re-spinning Melzer's words to mean Roger's pain was emotional, not physical. I'm pretty sure that's not what Melzer meant.
Ofcourse Melzer didnt mean anything bad
i hate Berdych
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Old 07-02-2010, 01:55 PM   #1090
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Beautifully said. Warm, empathetic, and suportive.

You set a very high standard for both quality of writing and content. Thank you, didadida.
it was written in the tennis magazine
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Old 07-02-2010, 03:04 PM   #1091
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Old 07-03-2010, 06:59 AM   #1092
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Even at home he is criticized.

http://www.swissinfo.ch/eng/sport/Sw...35858&rss=true
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Old 07-03-2010, 07:04 AM   #1093
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Wimbledon Fourth Round
R. Federer
Monday, 28 June 2010
R Federer Interview - 28 June
Q. Are you a fan of this Monday at Wimbledon where all the singles players are on show?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, yeah. I mean, it's great to be part of it when you make it to the second week, first of all. Secondly, I think it's wonderful for the fans. I always say for fans the best days are like quarterfinal day or last 16s, because then you usually have the big names but you still have enough matches to go look at, not only just on the big courts but also on the grounds. The juniors are also playing.

I mean, I think this is a wonderful day for the fans.

Q. How do you feel you played today?

ROGER FEDERER: I thought I played great. Aggressive right from the start, which I think was key today because I knew Melzer was going to try ‑‑ every chance he was going to get, he was going to hit the ball and come forward as well. You want to counter that and play aggressive yourself. I was able to do that very well today.

Q. Do you feel you can intimidate opponents on this Centre Court because you know it so well?

ROGER FEDERER: I don't play that trick. Honestly, I don't even know how it works. So I just try to play a good match, you know.

I know Jurgen too well to play tricks with him. I always say, you know, if you're not good enough and you have to use stuff like that, then you have issues. So I always say, Try to play your best, and if it's enough, that's great; otherwise you have to go to the practice courts and work harder and get better.

Crowds are wonderful here. Obviously I know every corner of this Centre Court. It helps. I've got the experience from playing so many big matches here. I don't obviously get too overexcited about a match like this. But I also have nerves going into a match like this. It's a guy I never played before. He's a good friend of mine. You don't want to lose.

Q. Any concerns about fitness at all? There was a photograph with some strapping on your thigh the other day. Is that just precaution?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, it was after my first‑round match. MY thigh was hurting a little bit, which already was the case in Halle. In the finals it was hurting me as well.

But honestly now I have no more problems, no more strapping. I'm happy I recovered that.

Q. How does the hot and dry weather change the conditions of the courts?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, this is not hot. This is normal to me anyway. Maybe for England, I don't know. For Switzerland, as well. But we're used to playing in 35, 40 degrees sometimes. This is moderate. Very comfortable to play in. This is kind of a one‑shirt‑change kind of match. That's rather easy.

But, no, obviously when it's nice and warm like this, it travels through the air a little bit. Also maybe glides through the grass a bit more. Then again, I think the difference is more from opening Monday to, you know, second week Monday, the court plays different. You can move better, I have the feeling, because it's not as slippery because the grass almost is gone.

It becomes a bit more of a hard court kind of a feel under your shoes. You get more grip, in my opinion. I think that's a bigger change than actually the weather.

Q. How have slower courts and the heavier tennis balls contributed to the decline of the serve‑and‑volley game in your estimation?

ROGER FEDERER: It's tough to say. I obviously came here in the year when I played Sampras, let's say, I was serve and volleying 80% of the first serve, 50% on the second serve.

I remember once speaking to Wayne Ferreira who I was playing doubles with that year actually. He said he used to serve and volley always first serve, 50% of the second serve. And towards the end of his career at Wimbledon, he used to serve and volley 50% of his first serve and not anymore on his second serve.

You wonder, how in the world has that happened? Have we become such incredible return players or can we not volley anymore or is it just a combination of slower balls, slower courts?

I think it's definitely a bit of a combination of many things. If I look back, I think we definitely had many more great volley players in the game back then. When you do have that, you are forced to move in, as well, because you don't want to hit passing shots against a great volleyer over and over again. But because we don't have that as much anymore, everybody's content staying at the baseline.

A bit unfortunate, I think, because I love guys moving in, like a Melzer match today who throws in the occasional serve and volley. You have to throw in great passing shots. It's unfortunate for the games. Unfortunately, they've slowed down everything, indoors, grass. Everything has become so slow, I think that is a bit of a pity.

Q. What have you missed by having that contrast like Sampras and Agassi?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I used to, thank God, still play in that era where I played against serve‑and‑volley players, chip‑and‑charge guys. It was a completely different game plan. Mindset you felt pressure the whole match because you knew it doesn't matter what surface on a couple of shots here and there. You don't get that feeling anymore as much.

Q. Yesterday this country and the sports world were shocked by some problematic officiating, and there were very loud calls for electronic officiating. Could you talk about how electronic officiating has evolved in our sport and would you call for it in soccer, especially at the goal line?

ROGER FEDERER: Have to be careful. Who is the head of the FIFA? I don't remember. Is he a Swiss guy by any chance (smiling)?

We have, what is it, electronic line calling even though we don't need it. We all know we don't, but we do have it. They should have it, and they don't. So it's a choice the guys have to make at the top, you know.

I do struggle a little bit with soccer at the time because there's so many mistakes from umpires. Don't blame them. They're so far away sometimes from what's happening, and then also so many goals are disallowed that are goals and others are not counted that would be goals. It's frustrating as a fan.

You just hope that all those things go for you when you're like in this kind of a stage of a tournament. They could have been sent home just because of that single mistake, and it's incredible.

I think it's rough, you know. To me it seems like it's just crying for a change, a bit.

Q. In our sport you feel it is best just to leave it in the hands of the linesmen and the chair umpire?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you have to understand, one forehand down the line doesn't change the outcome of the match; whereas one goal changes the entire mindset of a team, of a strategy. You know, you can play defense after that.

Tennis, we don't have that. Guys are sitting there, not moving. They're only staring at the line. It's so much more simple. It's going to even out throughout a career or a season, the good and bad calls.

Whereas goals, I mean, it's such a huge impact in those 90 minutes. It changes everything. That's why they have it in American football, right? They have challenges you can do. I mean, there's so many ways of trying to adjust the system.

Q. You came out missing a few first serves. How do you work on that as the match goes on?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, you look for your rhythm, try to make sure you get the right rhythm going. Well, then maybe you start finding the T serves; then you look for the wide serves. But everything happens very quickly. That's why I'm very happy I can rely on a good second serve. I think I won 70% on my second serve today. That was another key on winning the match in straight.

Q. Did it hurt at all to dismantle Melzer so easily and give him quite a beating since he's your friend?

ROGER FEDERER: No, that's just tennis. That's a tennis match. It's no more than that. He even said right after, the match was over at the end, he hopes he doesn't have to wait another 10 years to play me. He was not frustrated.

He was hoping for a second match right after the match was over. That's the kind of guy is. It's wonderful playing on Centre Court. He knows wherever he plays me around the world, it's most likely going to be Centre Court.

I think our games match up well. He probably likes my style of playing, moving forward, not giving him too much chances. I feel the same from his game as well. I think we would match up well if we play together more often.

so classy
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Old 07-03-2010, 12:26 PM   #1094
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"The commentary in Blick cited the writer’s English colleague who had said that Federer was big-headed, remarking that it was a wonder he had bowed to the Queen of Britain.

Even the Blick journalist conceded that Federer was not particularly modest. He went on to say that Federer was walking a fine line between sounding self-confident and arrogant.
"

bloody hell, can't believe the Swiss press would write something like that... Fed shows up to pay respect to the Queen and gets dissed for it, the current #1 doesn't bother to turn up and he gets a free pass. what is going on here??

so the media discounts Fed's efforts to promote tennis around the world, with the exos with Sampras, Borg & Mcenroe, he always comes out after every practice to spend time with the fans and sign all their stuff, he didn't pick his future wife from a SI Swimsuit catalogue, he doesn't do any of the blatant gamesmanship that other pros do court or abuse the rules, goodwill ambassador for UNICEF,

i mean if he were bigheaded he would never personally go down to south africa and then Ethiopia this March to see the kids for the RF foundation, organise the Hit for Haiti charity fundraising event, did the same back in 2005 for the Asian Tsunami, went back to India to visit the kids in the SOS villages in 07, etc.

So those stuff don't count anymore? doesn't make sense why the Swiss of all pple would kick this man when he's down. and i wonder who that parasite English journo is...
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Old 07-03-2010, 12:31 PM   #1095
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It's always been the case that the media likes you as long as you have success, but when you are down you get kicked even more.

What did people expect? A happy Roger in the media after he had lost in the tournament which means the most to him?

He goes along well with Tomas and I'm quite convinced that he has meanwhile texted him to wish him good luck for the final

A lot of players always mention it that they got messages from Roger when they had a good run at a tournament or were forced out of the game due to injury. They say that they are surprised that Roger follows their careers and lifes that closely.
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