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Old 06-20-2009, 06:37 AM   #376
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It was logical to lose one day and Rafa deserved it, absolutely.
Classy Roger.
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Old 06-20-2009, 11:35 AM   #377
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Originally Posted by FedFan_2007 View Post
Classy Roger.
No. Arrogant twat/prick Roger.
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Old 06-20-2009, 03:15 PM   #378
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Roger Federer disappointed Rafael Nadal had to pull out of Wimbledon

June 20, 2009 Roger Federer admits he was disappointed by Rafael Nadal's withdrawal from Wimbledon because he would have relished the chance to take on his great rival in another epic final.

Nadal, the world number one, opted to pull out of the All-England Club tournament after conceding that the knee tendinitis which has bothered him for several years was too painful to survive a gruelling two-week grand slam.

The Spaniard's dramatic five-set victory over Federer in the Wimbledon final last year, regarded as one of the greatest matches of all time, shattered the Swiss star's air of invincibility on the grass courts of south-west London.

Nadal's decision not to defend his title leaves Federer as firm favourite to win Wimbledon for the sixth time and beat Pete Sampras's record of 14 grand slam titles.

But, although he could have been forgiven for letting out a yelp of joy when he heard the news, Federer insists he felt a slight sense of anti-climax as it meant a temporary end to the rivalry.

"It's disappointing for me, of course, because I'd love to play him. He's my main rival," Federer said at a pre-tournament press conference.

"We've had some wonderful matches over the years, and especially the one here last year was the one that obviously stands out. So that we can't repeat that is obviously sad.

"We played the last four years against each other in Paris. We played the last three years against each other here at Wimbledon. So we definitely won't see the same finals again."

Federer, the world number two, had a feeling Nadal would withdraw after a brief chat with the Spaniard on Wednesday.

"We had a 10 second chat. He congratulated me for Paris and I asked him how his knee was. He was like, 'it's okay'. So I kind of knew it wasn't great, because he's very honest to me. So I knew that something could be coming up.

"I heard he was gonna have a press conference on Friday and I guess I was slightly prepared that he wouldn't play, so then it doesn't come as such a big surprise. It's obviously very disappointing for the tournament, and also for myself."

Nadal's premature exit has presented Federer with a golden opportunity to retain his title and regain the world number one spot but there is no chance of the pressure getting to him.

Ending his long wait to win the French Open after so many painful defeats to Nadal in Paris has lifted Federer's mood to such an extent that he believes he will go into the tournament completely relaxed.

"I don't feel like I have extra pressure now having to win the tournament," he said.

"There's a lot of weight off my shoulders since Paris. So I'm entering tournaments a little bit more relaxed these days."

When Federer, who has reached the last 20 grand slam semi-finals, steps onto Centre Court for his first round match against Taiwan's Yen-Hsun Lu on Monday it will be his first tennis since beating Robin Soderling in the Roland Garros final.

He missed the grass-court tournament at Halle last week to let the emotions of winning the French Open settle down and now he is refreshed and ready to go.

"I know when to take a break and when not to. I was mentally drained because I felt like I had to play like four finals at the end of Paris because of the pressure," he said.

"There's such a relief and happiness once it was all over that for me it was almost impossible to change it all around again and start a tournament from scratch again like two days after.

"I've been practising really well. The weather has been good as well and I feel like I'm ready to go."

http://www.foxsports.com.au/story/0,...-23216,00.html
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Old 06-20-2009, 03:28 PM   #379
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"We had a 10 second chat. He congratulated me for Paris and I asked him how his knee was. He was like, 'it's okay'. So I kind of knew it wasn't great, because he's very honest to me. So I knew that something could be coming up.
That is so Swiss.
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Old 06-20-2009, 04:37 PM   #380
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“It’s extraordinary for me because you figure everybody would like someone else to win, but maybe it’s the way I react to winning, the way I am respectful to the others and how fair I am because the players have voted for me five times to win the Stefan Edberg Sportsmanship Award. What I can say is, ‘Thank you very much, thank you for being happy for me.’ It does you good as a player to hear that once in a while.”
Who wants to bet that, if this article is posted in GM, people will just be all "pfff arrogant prick thinks he's so great" again?

Quote:
“I suffered in Melbourne; nobody enjoys crying on the stage. In Miami I started well in the event, I had beaten Andy [Roddick] and I felt I would have the better of Novak [Djokovic] in the semi-finals, and it was going fine for a while when all of a sudden I was in a slump. I couldn’t hit the ball in the court any more. I had chances early in the second set, but my serve wasn’t clicking, my forehand and backhand went. It was a nightmare. Do you know what? I was just so sick and tired of playing so bad that when I missed that easy forehand I said, ‘It’s OK, just let it out.’ I was actually surprised how hard I crushed my racket.


And he did actually play better after that... it was just a little too late, unfortunately.

Quote:
Federer, the world number two, had a feeling Nadal would withdraw after a brief chat with the Spaniard on Wednesday.

"We had a 10 second chat. He congratulated me for Paris and I asked him how his knee was. He was like, 'it's okay'. So I kind of knew it wasn't great, because he's very honest to me. So I knew that something could be coming up.

"I heard he was gonna have a press conference on Friday and I guess I was slightly prepared that he wouldn't play, so then it doesn't come as such a big surprise. It's obviously very disappointing for the tournament, and also for myself."
I read about Fed's presser on the Wimbledon site, but it didn't mention much regarding his reaction to Nadal's withdrawal, just the bolded part, which was a little "...uh?" considering what Fed had said earlier about Nadal's injury. But this article also mentions them talking briefly, which makes much more sense.
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Old 06-20-2009, 04:49 PM   #381
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thanks!
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Old 06-20-2009, 07:57 PM   #382
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No. Arrogant twat/prick Roger.
Nadine -
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Old 06-20-2009, 08:05 PM   #383
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Nadine -
Sarcasm. I was having am inderct dig against those GM people who continually claim he's an arrogant twat.
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Old 06-21-2009, 04:27 AM   #384
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Roger Federer - 20 June 2009
Saturday, 20 June 2009

Q. Can I ask you where you were when you heard the news about Rafa last night, what your immediate reaction was and what your reaction is now?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I was here. I heard he was gonna have a press conference at 7:00 p.m. around 5:00 or so. You know, I didn't know if he was just going to announce that he was going to be playing or not playing. I guess that was the question.

So I guess I was, you know, slightly prepared that he wouldn't play, so then it doesn't come as such a big surprise. So it's obviously very disappointing for the tournament, and also for myself.
Q. Are you emotionally ready for Wimbledon now after the massive win in the French Open less than two weeks ago?
ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I feel, you know, good. I feel like I'm playing very well at the moment. On the grass, it didn't take me much time to get used to the conditions on grass. I mean, never really does.

But it was good to take a week off, you know, get away from it all and enjoy the time at home and recover. I feel like I'm ready to go here.

Q. Do you feel a weight of expectation that's come back onto you? Did you feel it when Nadal lost at the French, and do you feel it now that he's pulled out here? Do you feel expectations have gone back onto your shoulders, perhaps?
ROGER FEDERER: No, I mean, you can't compare what happened at the French with this. You know, we were in the middle of a tournament during Paris, you know, when he lost. You know, I've never won Paris before, so it's a completely different situation.

I've already beaten, you know, Rafa here twice in finals, so I know I can, you know, beat him here. I just think it's very disappointing that he can't play.

But I don't feel like I have extra pressure now having to win the tournament or trying to. I mean, anyway, there's a lot of weight off my shoulders since Paris.

So I'm anyway entering tournaments, I guess, a little bit more relaxed these days.

Q. The fact that you didn't play a tournaments two years ago between the French and here, does that give you more assurance about how you'll be this year?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, yeah, maybe a touch, you know. But at the same time, I know when to take a break and when not to. You know, when to push for another tournament. This one was just hard.

You know, I was mentally drained because I felt like I had to play like four finals at the end of Paris because of the pressure. You know, there's such a relief and happiness once it was all over that for me it was almost impossible to change it all around again and start, you know, a tournament from scratch again like two days after.

So, I mean, I always know that I'm gonna be in good shape, because in practice you can't simulate matches as well in a way. You know, you can practice even harder, and that's what I'm trying to do this week. I've been practicing really well. The weather has been good as well, and I feel like I'm ready to go.

Now obviously the results will only show. I'm definitely missing those big pressure moments of having to face breakpoints and all these kind of things. But you get similar feelings in practice sometimes. So I feel like I'm playing well enough to do very well here.

Q. Does it surprise you that Bjorn, all five years, he didn't play a tournament between the French Open and Wimbledon?
ROGER FEDERER: Not really, no. It's possible, yeah.

Q. Do you consider Andy Murray to be your principal threat now that Rafa is out?
ROGER FEDERER: No, I mean, I always said Andy I think is a wonderful grass court player, and he showed a little bit last year even though he was not very close with Gasquet in that one match where he fought very brave.

But, no, you know, I think with the success he's had on hard courts, you know, the last let's say especially last year where he's been very, very solid and very, very good. I always knew that Andy was going to be, you know, one of the toughest ones to beat on grass next to Rafa and Djokovic, and I think even like Del Potros, Tsongas, Gonzálezs, and now even Soderling.

There are so many guys around who are dangerous and up and coming still. Maybe it's hard for them to win the tournament, but on any given day they can create a huge upset. Then you have the usual suspects: Roddick I think is going to be so difficult to beat again because he's playing better. And other players, so it's being to be an interesting championship, I think.

Q. In your experience, the huge pressure of being a Briton at Wimbledon, do you think that will help him or cramp his style?
ROGER FEDERER: Time will tell really. I mean, seems like he handled it well last year. Again, he handled it well in Queen's, so seems like it's going to be okay for him.

Q. You and Tiger Woods both have 14 major titles. What are the other similarities that you see between the two of you?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, success, I guess. I mean, I don't know what else to say. I mean, like we've been at the top for a very long time. We've been when you talk about golf, you talk about Tiger; when you talk about tennis, you talk about me.

So it's something we have, you know, something similar there. Our mindset, our approach. You know, we're very driven. We try to not only just play well, but we try to dominate, you know, if we can. There is obviously many similarities in this regard.

Q. To what degree is the majors record on your mind going into this tournament, and how do you hope it will affect you, if at all?
ROGER FEDERER: Uhm, the focus is on the first round and the first point, you know. But trying to regain my Wimbledon crown, I guess, so that stands over trying to beat, you know, Pete's record right now.

But I guess once I come down to the semifinals or finals, hopefully, you know, in like 10, 12 days, you know, then hopefully that's also gonna start creeping into my mind.

But right now, just trying to regain my Wimbledon crown. It would be a dream come true, of course.

Q. Could I ask you in which way is Rafael Nadal's absence for you disappointing?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, it's a little bit similar to Paris. We played the last four years against each other in Paris. We played the last three years against each other here at Wimbledon. So we definitely won't see the same finals again.

So that's disappointing for me, of course, because I'd love to play him. He's my main rival. We've had some wonderful matches over the years, and especially the one here last year was the one that obviously stands out.

So that we can't potentially maybe repeat that, uhm, is obviously sad. But it gives me it just shows me how lucky I've been, you know, that I haven't been injured over all those years, you know, that I've been able to keep it up.

Even though I was No. 1, the one people were going after, I was there, I was not injured very often, and I was able to keep it up. It just shows it goes so quick.

So it's unfortunate. I'm sad for him, because it must have been a very difficult decision to make.

Q. Did you see him at all during the week here?
ROGER FEDERER: Uhm, on Wednesday maybe, just briefly.

Q. Did you chat at all?
ROGER FEDERER: Chat? 10 second chat maybe (smiling). He congratulated me for Paris. It was good to see him. I asked him how his knee was. He was like, it's okay. So I kind of knew it wasn't great, because he's very honest to me. So I knew that something could be coming up.

Q. Can you compare trying to tie an all time record versus trying to break an all time record? Is there any different pressure?
ROGER FEDERER: I don't know if it's got that much to do with it. Let's say in Paris, it was just trying to win my first Paris, you know. Then obviously if it happens at the same time, you know, now that I was able to tie sort of let's say Agassi's or Laver's, those four different majors, or the 14 of Sampras, it was maybe very fitting that it all happened at once, you know.

But, you know, I didn't particularly enter the French trying to tie Pete's record again. I was just trying to win my first Roland Garros, you know. It's very a different approach. I think when you're down lower, you know, you have eight, nine majors maybe and you're trying to get up there, this is when you're maybe forcing it more. You're trying to say, All right, I need to get a few to pick it up there.

Since I been very close, I knew I had kind of some time on my side. I knew if things fell into place that I was gonna win more majors, you know. So same thing here. I don't feel any pressure having to beat Pete's record right now this week, but I know that things are looking good for me.

If I win Paris, there's obviously a very good chance I can also win Wimbledon without, you know, underestimating any of the opponents, because they're all playing very well, as well. They want to win the tournament here, as well.

Q. One player who pushed you really hard at the French was Juan Martin Del Potro. How do you see his game translating to the grass? Perhaps any danger with his movement or anything like that?
ROGER FEDERER: Well, I played him here actually a few years ago on Court 1. I beat him in straight sets. Of course, he's a different player to a few years ago. Even last year I think he lost quite early to my friend Stanislas Wawrinka in straight sets maybe, as well.

So I think with confidence, you know, that can help in a big way. He's improved his serve a lot, which is obviously an important key on grass. And that's why I see him also having a run here on this type of surface.

Sure, he doesn't have the experience. That could work both ways. So I think the beginning is important for him, you know, getting through the first week, because this is where the grass is maybe probably the most difficult for him to move on.

Q. You're known as a very sporting role model. In the matches you've lost to Andy Murray, it seems you've been a little bit irritated, I don't know, by his style, or maybe it was just to lose the matches. Is there anything about his game or his style that irritates you?
ROGER FEDERER: Just that he's very good, otherwise not a whole lot.

Q. Nothing particular about the way he plays?
ROGER FEDERER: No. I mean, he's a very gifted player, you know. He has wonderful feel. He's a great tactician. I always said that, you know. And he's finally proved it because it took him some time, you know. That was the disappointing part, I thought, that it took him longer than I expected, you know. So I was wrong with my prediction, because I expected him to do better a few years ago.

But, you know, everything is coming together for him now and he's been rock solid for, you know, over a year now, almost two years now. So, uhm, he's there where he belongs, absolutely.

Q. Do you think, if you and Andy did reach the final, a big if...
ROGER FEDERER: Big if, yes.

Q. Do you think the head to head advantage he's got over you will be a factor?
ROGER FEDERER: Speculation. I don't really want to answer that. Really there's no point to talk about it. Sorry. Love to talk about it, but not there yet.

Q. What sort of impact do you think, if it's used, the roof will make on Centre Court? How will it change the atmosphere there?
ROGER FEDERER: I think it's actually gonna I'm not gonna say it makes the atmosphere better, but might be more intimate because, you know, the sound will stay within the stadium. You're not looking for rain. Looking forward to experience it.

Q. You'd love to play?
ROGER FEDERER: I'd love to play, yeah, sure, indoors. I've played in Halle, you know, in Germany, indoor grass sort of because they've also got the sliding roof, and it worked very well. They even had to once close it during the finals. We stayed on court, they shut the roof, and we continued on. Then the big rain came.

The atmosphere, you know, remained great. Even got a bit more, you know, intense, the whole thing. I'm sure it's gonna be really, really nice.

I went to see Centre Court the other day. You know, it didn't lose anything of the whole history part. It still remains, you know, the best court in the world. I'm excited to going out there on Monday.
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roger is the best
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Old 06-21-2009, 10:24 AM   #385
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Wha-unhhh! A Defense of the Tennis Grunt
Wesley Morris, Boston Globe
(http://www.boston.com/bostonglobe/id..._grunt/?page=3)
June 21, 2009

...snip

Grunting has altered the strategic landscape of tennis, whether we like it or not. But purists can take heart: there is still Roger Federer, who plays with power, finesse, a chess master’s agenda, and, as Navratilova noted during her rant, zero noise. When he was winning everything, his opponents’ grunting no longer sounded like an advertisement of power. It began to sound like men struggling just to stay in the game. Nadal changed that - a grunter who could beat Federer physically and then mentally - but one starts to worry that Nadal’s audibly Herculean effort will eventually wear him down, if not out.

Federer’s failure to grunt, in other words, can be seen not as retro, but as an impressive adaptation to the evolution of the game. In a world of grunters, it may be the quiet man who is king.
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Old 06-21-2009, 03:10 PM   #386
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thanks!
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Old 06-22-2009, 07:57 AM   #387
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Un-see to see
Adrian Mendonza / June 22, 2009
Business Standard (http://www.business-standard.com/ind...to-see/361739/)

For the last seven successive seasons, Federer has held not just the tennis lover’s imagination, but that of a fair bit of humanity. So, what’s so special about him (aside from the fact he wins grand slams the way you and I might sip coffee?) And why talk about the man when this is not a piece on tennis, but on advertising?

The answer to both those questions is a much proffered, but often misunderstood reason - creativity. We were all born to be extraordinary and that’s why we gravitate towards what we perceive as creative. And frankly, in spite of a zillion definitions, just what is creativity? I believe it’s about seeing what everyone sees, in a new way. It’s about un-seeing the mundane and the mediocre. The way Federer makes us un-see tennis. The way some ads make us un-see a product.

Six years ago in 2003, Honda ‘Cog’ was created. That unending 2-minute piece of wizardry, where 100 (or was it 200) parts fell tantalizingly into place to create a car. Twisting, turning, swaying and skipping to result in pure visual sorcery. You may have seen countless car ads, but if you saw ‘Cog’ even once, it would stick. Simply because it made you un-see. It revealed a car like never before. And went on to win every advertising award.

Six years ago in 2003, Roger Federer burst into our mind space too, winning his first Wimbledon title. Playing tennis in a very ‘Cog’ way. Come to think of it, Federer is not just about tennis, he’s about sorcery and wizardry. You will never find Roger play in a blur, whizzing maniacally from one side of the court to the other, grunting and crushing the tennis ball like it is something that is to be overpowered or vanquished. Instead, he always seems to have time on his hands, caressing, cajoling and almost loving the tennis ball to do his bidding. Surprising you with his style. Finding the most gratifying angles with his silken touch. Raising the sport to a level of fine art.

Because if you really think about it, do we love Federer just because he is one of the greatest ever tennis players? There have been other great champions too, but have we loved them with the same care and tenderness? Why is it, that a loss for Federer brings pain worldwide? I have come to see just one reason for this.

Federer makes us see tennis like never before. He makes us un-see the mundane and the mediocre. He is all about grace and goodness and giving joy through the game he plays. The kind of joy one feels when gazing upon a beautiful painting, listening to an intense piece of music, or viewing a magically crafted piece of communication. As human beings we are all artists. We all want to leave behind a more beautiful world.

And every time Roger Federer steps onto court, he paints a picture of our real purpose in this life.

(The author is National Creative Director, Dentsu Marcom)
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Old 06-22-2009, 08:09 AM   #388
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Default Re: Roger news and articles

^^^^
Wow, I couldn't put it any better. Roger is an artist.
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Old 06-22-2009, 04:22 PM   #389
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thanks!
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Old 06-23-2009, 07:16 AM   #390
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Default Re: Roger news and articles

Dressing Roger
Posted 06/22/2009 @ 4 :06 PM

by Pete Bodo

Mornin'. Wimbledon is underway, right? Everyone is getting back into 14-days-in-the-tennis-hole watching mode, warming up that right-handed move to the bowl full of orange food (How can Cheetos be bad for you if they're just crunchy air?), the faster-than-Twitter skitter on the keyboard or (if you're lucky enough) the remote. . . It's time to warn the neighbors - that scream or bellow they're going to hear is not you killing the cat, it's you agonizing over the fact that Agnes Szavay just had her serve broken to go down a set and a break!

Given all this, it's really strange to recognize that for a handful of people, Wimbledon isn't just beginning - it's already over. The Wimbledon website doesn't provide scorecards (although you can find those ever valuable if not entirely convincing match stats), so I'm not entirely certain I've got this right, but judging by the scores I believe that the first player to lose at Wimbledon was Petra Cetkovska, who was beaten in an hour and seven minutes in the first match of the first day on Court 5 by Anastasia Pavlyuchenkova, 6-2, 6-2.

A moment of silence for Petra, please. Her Wimbledon of 2009 is over before it ever really began, and certainly long before it began for most players and the lion's share of tennis fans. I've often thought it must be an awful bummer to be out of Wimbledon an hour into it, and that's probably one good reason to keep doubles and mixed on the program. It affords downtrodden players the opportunity to hang around and savor the unique atmosphere at Wimbledon, and to bask in their glory as top tennis professionals in tennis's equivalent of the fur trade's legendary Rendezvous. If it weren't for doubles, all of Monday night you might be hearing the plop-plop-plop of bodies falling into the Thames from any of London's picturesque and historic bridges. Fog or no fog.

Cetkovska is a 24-year old Czech, and she's only escaped the first round at a major twice in eight attempts, although one of those occasions looks almost like a career run: She got to the fourth round at Roland Garros in 2008, which makes you wonder if those were all live bodies she elbowed out of the way - especially because her favorite shots are the volley and serve, and her surfaces of choice are hardcourt and grass. Hmmmmm. . . you could forgive Cetkovska if she went home, looked in the mirror, and hissed, "Petra, I don't even know who you are anymore."

But while it's fun fooling around with these details, let's remember that Cetkovska is (or has been, according to ranking) one of the best 50 women tennis players. . . on the face of the earth. Which gives her a degree-of-distinction I certainly can't match, even if you can. So I'm glad she still has doubles, although it isn't what you would call major comfort - she has yet to win her first doubles match at a major.

But hey, the doubles doesn't really get going for a few more days and, given the customary Wimbledon rain delays, Petra might have locker room privileges for at least two or three more days - plenty of time to for her to take advantage of the perks offered to main draw players, and to be accosted by giggling school kids with their autograph books as she makes her way through the crowds jammed into the walkways while carrying her giant racket bag and looking tres cool in her predominantly-whites. She may also get to rub shoulders in the player's mess with her favorite player, Roger Federer, whom she likes because, in her own words, "He's a great player and a good person."

Federer may be a great player and a good person but his latest fashion statement once again suggests that he wants to be taken for some kind of a swell - which is probably not even remotely close to the truth, but if Roger can't control the message, who can? This latest get-up is something you expect to see on a cruise ship host - check that - someone playing the part of one in a campy television show. It's distressing that Federer, who (admirably enough) claims to love "tradition" should be party to what amounts to a grotesque parody of it. Who's he trying to be, Big Bill Tilden - or some Don Ho cut loose on the greensward?

What's most surprising to me is that Roger doesn't seem to get it. I suspect that the Nike designers and marketing folks must come to him and fill him up with a bunch of hooey about what an "ambassador" he is for all things traditional and he goes all weak in the knees and capitulates to one cockamamie fashion disaster after another. The 14-time Grand Slam champ and budding fashionista turns commercial chump and, like some unsuspecting kid brother, lets his sister and her friends play dress-up with him. What next, lipstick and mom's pumps?

I bring this subject up partly because it has deja vu written all over it, and I'm not just talking about the ongoing process of Roger's dandification. Remember Andre Agassi's early years? Nike dressed Andre up in a series of Bozo the Clown outfits, driven by what probably was a similar urge to overstatement. In context, this goes by the name of client positioning and identification, and unless the client in question is very savvy, the drive to secure him in a niche - and the existence of a niche takes over the process.

In Andre's case, the niche was colorful young rebel, wreaking havoc on a game for old men and ladies prancing around in white. We saw where it led (hot pink spandex running leggings under charcoal gray shorts, among other things) The only thing Nike didn't do in its effort to capture "market share" among mall rats was pass out a free pack of cigarettes with every shirt they sold. And all that hurt Andre among those who didn't see through the ghastly commercial realities of it all.

In Roger's case, the niche is proud and unapologetic snob (or what that talented rebel caught and re-educated early enough could become, kind of like Bob Geldof). And in any event, it's a different, older and wealthier demographic. Roger seems to be standing up to be counted as a lucky, privileged Porsche-driving, mummsy-loving, polo-watching, country club dandy.

Why would anyone want to be portrayed as either of those creatures, you might be inclined to wonder, and are there enough of either type to warrant dumping so much Big Money into these campaigns? That's where it gets a little tricky, but also strategically nuanced. I noticed in the comments the other day that someone remarked that you can't even buy half the stuff you see Roger swanning around in, so what's the point?

I have to confess that I personally never went out to try to find an R/F manpurse, or a blazer with the astrological signs and laurel wreaths all over it, but doesn't it make sense that the stuff isn't available? I mean, if every Tom, Dick and Harry could go out to Target and pick up a Roger Federer Wimbledon blazer, what would that do for Roger's snob appeal, or the underlying theme of these campaigns, which is that he's Roger Federer and you're not?

On the other hand, if you really identify with The Mighty Fed, and have made your peace with the idea that you are not now, nor ever will be, be mistaken for a guy as classy and steeped in tennis tradition as Roger, you can express your fan-love and low self-esteem by scurrying off to the Nike store to buy a really nice $40 white t-shirt with the RF logo on the chest (and it's even bigger than that annoying polo player on the Ralph Lauren shirts, woo hoo!). That ought to be good enough for you, because like we said - he's Roger Federer and you're not.

To some degree, Nike must have been paying attention when its prized tennis client was hobnobbing at all those fashion shows with Anna Wintour. Nobody wears those bizarre costumes you see models parading on the catwalks either, right? They're "art", right? None of you regular folks need to buy or wear that stuff; the t-shirt or, if you must put on airs or want to get closer to the flame, $65 tennis polo ought to be just fine.

Well, I think it's great that Roger is trying to be mindful of tradition and all that, but we've passed the tipping point on that one. And while I'm not a big golf fan, it seems to me that Nike came a lot closer to getting it right with that other budding immortal, Tiger Woods. Every time I've caught a glimpse of Tiger on a golf course, he's been dressed in really appealing and completely appropriate gear - stuff that's elegant in a streamlined, sporty, functional way. How come Nike declined to dress Tiger in Bobby Jones-style knickers, with a cabbie cap? Could it be that Tiger just said, "No way!"

Roger may enjoy all this elaborate role-playing in a harmless way; down deep he probably thinks it's really cool that he can go out there looking so Brideshead Revisited and still leave opponents bleeding from the eardrums. But I think these costumes really send an awful, reactionary message, and can't help but think that Roger's being naive. It may be cool to look like an utter weenie and then kick buttski left and right, rubbing the dirt of your greatness in everyone's face. But at the end of the day, too many people are going to see Roger's kit and think: Guy's a heckuva tennis player, but he looks like such a weenie. I guess that's still what tennis is all about.

In the big picture, Roger Federer deserves to have a better image than that, and tennis certainly could be better represented as a sport that transcends all the socio-economic associations and stereotypes Federer's recent costumes conjure up. Roger, you're being used. Man up, call and ask Tiger about it
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the recipe is simple yet but extremely rare:buckets of athletic ability coupled with gallons of mental tenacity are the core ingredients that produce a Tiger Woods,a Michael Jordan...a Roger Federer


roger is the best
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