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Old 06-03-2009, 04:18 PM   #241
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Old 06-04-2009, 03:11 PM   #242
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RG: History vs . . . Le Sod?
Posted 06/03/2009 @ 8 :42 PM

We’ve reached the end of the long, dusty, sometimes bumpy, often slippery highway known as the European clay-court season. There have been fabulous sights along the roadside—Nadal-Djokovic in Monte Carlo and Madrid stood out as shining peaks of will and athleticism; we’ll put the snapshots on our Facebook pages—as well as a couple of bizarre and eye-opening locations, like Soderling-Nadal, that didn’t appear on the map. Most surprising of all, however, and something we’ll need to discuss once this trip is over, is how three of the vaunted Big 4 ran out of gas before the finish line.

For now, let’s concentrate on who’s still in the race. Of the eight players left in Paris, there's a little of the familiar—Roger Federer has reached his fifth straight semi at Roland Garros; Dinara Safina and Svetlana Kuznetsova will try to improve on past runner-up finishes—and a lot of the foreign. Did anyone on this planet have Cibulkova, Stosur, or Soderling in their brackets? If you had all three, then you know too much about tennis and need to find a hobby; look into curing cancer for us.

What does this mean for the four semifinals to be played Thursday and Friday? Unpredictability is the first word that comes to mind. We’ll see new faces coping with new situations, and last year’s underdogs, Federer and Safina, will find themselves the favorites this time around. But nothing is so unpredictable that we can’t make a stab at predicting it, right? It just means there’s a higher chance of me being wrong, which, if you’re anything like I am when I read other sportswriters, is what you want to happen in the first place. It’s such a bore when they get it right.

It’s a little late to make the women forecasts—they go on court about 11 hours from now—so I’ll stick with the guys today and get back to the WTA on Friday.

Robin Soderling vs. Fernando Gonzalez

Judging from the way these guys have played over the last couple of rounds, this could be the most vicious slugfest in the sport’s history—it will at least have the most elaborate wind-ups. I feel sorry for the ball, as well for anyone or anything, ball kids, linespeople, the net, that has to be on court with these two guys.

Gonzo owns a 4-3 record over Le Sod and has won their last four encounters, two of which came on clay. But they haven’t faced each other in two years, and you get the sense from their past scorelines that Soderling, while he’s the less-accomplished player, has held his own most of the time.

In this dynamic, that means he’s been able to stand toe to toe with Gonzalez and make his mark with his own long-swinging belts at the ball. They can both win points, and will need to win points, with their serves. They can each light up a forehand, but where Gonzo uses his once-handed backhand primarily as a rally shot, Soderling can be consistently offensive, both from the baseline and off returns of serve, with his two-hander. Gonzalez is the faster player and better athlete. The Chilean is also more comfortable on clay, though the Swede defended and slid surprisingly well in beating Nadal.

This one will be decided by Soderling. Is there more to this tall man's Cinderella story? Will he continue to live in his zone of unconsciousness, where the balls that used to fly away now land exactly where he wants them? Can he keep walking that magical and infinitesimal line between hitting as hard as you can and overhitting? I think he can. I don’t think Soderling's race is run quite yet.

Winner: Soderling

Juan Martin del Potro vs. Roger Federer

The five-set, one-good-inside-out-forehand escape against Tommy Haas will help Federer. It worked that way when he won a five-setter over Andreev at the U.S. Open last year, and it very nearly worked again when he came back from two sets down to beat Berdych in Melbourne. It will lessen his anxiety if he gets behind and make him feel, somehow, that the worst is behind him. He played a much cleaner, looser, unhurried, and assured match against Monfils today. Rarely has Federer transferred his elegantly forceful all-court game so completely to clay. It helped that Monfils, while a dangerous bomb-thrower from afar, is hardly the bullying type. He allowed Federer free rein to create, especially on the key points in the first set tiebreaker. And you know what happens when Federer has free rein.

As I wrote over at ESPN on Wednesday, Roger Federer’s insurance policy right now is “Roger Federer.” If you’re trying to close out a three-of-five-setter against him, you’re not just trying to beat a player, you’re trying to beat a name. It may be an unremarkable name to you and I, possibly the product of a garbled mispronunciation by an ancient stammerer in his family—why isn’t is just “Feder”?; why not go all the way and make it “Federererer”?—but it spells doom for his opponents at the majors. The thought of ending Federer's run here, and his streak of 20 straight Slam semis, is a lot of weight to carry around a tennis court, and three sets is a long time to think about it. You could see Haas buckle under that weight when he double-faulted at 4-4 in the third set of their fourth rounder.

No one has been more obviously spooked by Federer's reputation than del Potro, who lost an embarrassing two-bagel semi to him in Australia. But the long and lean Argentine has taken his career one step upward at a time—he’s beaten Nadal and Murray for the first time in 2009—and will be better prepared for the same stage in Paris. I’ve been impressed by the way he’s carried himself through this event. No panic, no frustration, no ups and downs. He’s stalked the courts patiently and come up with big serves when he’s needed them. Unlike Monfils, I have to believe that del Potro will try to impose his will as soon as he gets a chance and not let Federer run free; he should be able to hurry him in rallies. A lot of it may come down to del Potro’s return—he anticipates well—and whether he can trouble Federer in his service games and make the match a scrappier, more up and down affair than Sire Jacket would like it to be. I’ll give him a set.

Winner: Federer

Final: If it’s Le Sod vs. Roget, the Swede will need to do his best to take control of the rallies ASAP, the way he did with Nadal. I’d give him a shot, as you should all Cinderellas, of staying unconscious for three more sets. But while he’ll go into the match with nothing to lose, if he gets ahead, he’ll suddenly find himself with very much to lose. In the end, Federer couldn’t ask for a better opponent. He’s 9-0 against Soderling and hasn’t dropped even a set to him since 2005 (he’s 12-1 against Gonzalez).

The opportunity to finally win the French and claim the Goat mantle once and for all will put pressure on Federer and motivate him in equal measures. He’s always been a strong closer at Slams, and he’ll have to feel relieved and freed up a bit not having to face Rafa. Plus, there’s the obnoxiously partisan Parisian crowd, which will make either Soderling or Gonzalez feel like they’re facing into the gale-force winds of tennis history and committing a criminal act by trying to fight it. I’d advise both of them to keep their heads down. If they look up past the audience and to the heavens for help, they may catch a glimpse of the scoreboard, with its bright flashing letters spelling out the two words they don't want to see: Roger Federer.

Champion: Federer
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Old 06-04-2009, 03:13 PM   #243
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Roger: Pleased to Meet Me!
Posted 06/03/2009 @ 3 :36 PM




By Pete Bodo

For a while there today, I thought I was going to go nuts. I sit beside Doug Robson (you can also read him in USA Today) in the press room, and there's about eight inches of room between the edges of our flat-screen, digital, Sony TV monitors. His was tuned to Serena vs. Sveta, mine was dialed in to the first set of the match between The Mighty Fed and The Flighty Monf - or, if you prefer, La Monf.

At about the time Federer and Monfils were playing their critical first-set tiebreaker on Chatrier, the women were handing break and match points back and forth out on Lenglen. My eyeballs were flying back and forth while I was trying to trying to keep up with the commentary in French on my box, and nearby Tom Tebbutt was yelling at some editor in Toronto about how well TMF was playing.

Granted, it wasn't the worst place to be on otherwise ordinary Wednesday afternoon in June, and my problem more or less solved itself with surprising speed when Serena gagged and Federer tagged a cross-court volley to do something he hadn't managed in his two previous rounds: win the first set.

Suddenly, the story line was obvious: these were two champions, traveling in two different directions - Serena toward the first-class lounge at Charles de Gaulle airport, and Federer toward, well, daring to go where few if not exactly no men have gone before - a career Grand Slam. There hasn't been much talk about "full flight" Federer these past few months; maybe from now on we should talk about. . . Starship Roger.

But let's look at that women's match first. It was complicated and highly entertaining in the manner of similar WTA brawls (for example, their most recent previous meeting, in the Australian Open of a few months ago). By the time it was done, Williams and Kuznetsova both clutched hanks of each other's hair, each woman had scratch marks on her face, and splintered fingernails. It's futile talking about turning points and momentum shifts in such matches. And while the following analysis, delivered in what is becoming Serena's trademark deadpan, halting, borderline sarcastic drawl, doesn't quite do justice to the gritty nature of the battle (one nasty tumble left Kuznetsova with a patch of clay sticking to her wet hair; she would wear it proudly the rest of the way), it's a pretty accurate description of what happened:

"In the third I had an opportunity and I got really tight, and I pretty much gave it to her (Serena was up a break early and served to stay in the match at 5-6 and was broken). It was like. . .'Here. . .' you know, 'Do you want to go to the semis? Because I don't.' She was like, Okay.' "

Some reports will also emphasize that Serena's praise for Sveta was lukewarm at best, and how she once again bathed in that storied Egyptian river when she said: "Honestly I think I lost because of me, and not because of anything she did. You know, I don't think that makes it easier, but it makes me realize that, you know, had I done different things I would have been able to win."

I don't mind the self-centeredness of this familiar rationalization; she's a highly combative, competitive athlete. What I object to is its careless, unexamined stupidity. I'll bet Serena would be far less inclined to seek comfort in that trope if someone, some day, asked her: Serena, does it ever occur to you that, oh, Virginia Ruano Pascual might have said the same thing after you dusted her, two-and-oh, in the second round? You know, had I done different things, I would have been able to win.

Duh! Serena's crime may not be arrogance, but simple thoughtlessness.

Anyway. . . I sitting just a few feet behind the baseline at Lenglen for the first set of the match and it was a treat, even for a worn-out old guy like me. I savored the great shots executed by these two exceptional talents, which were numerous even when interrupted by occasional bouts of the competitive yips. These are two of the most appealing ball strikers in the game, which means that they strip the two qualifying adjectives out of the term, "clay-court tennis."

If you remember their Australian encounter, you'll know that Kuzzie served for that one, too, at 5-4 in the second - only to choke it away. The letdown opened the door to a 6-1 in the third win by Serena. The big difference today was that Kuznetsova, while gagging frequently and freely at various points, never quite surrendered to the subversive fatalism that runs like veins of coal through her otherwise colorful thoughts and feelings. She didn't exactly banish doubt, she just managed it a hail of a lot better than she has on previous occasions. And for that she was rewarded.

In any event, the other closely-watched match of the day played out as differently as could be imagined. This morning, I posted some thoughts on how the "French issue" might affect this match, and my reasoning was flawed. I assumed (albeit unconsciously) that Federer/Monfils would be a shootout - maybe nothing quite so wild west as Sveta-'Rena (is anything?), but a good grapple in the red dirt. It was no such thing because Federer played a first set that would have entitled him to sit down on the next changeover and say to himself: Roger Federer? Pleased to meet me!

Federer came out firing on all cylinders, and you could almost visualize him ticking the items off a mental to-do list in that critical first set (and let's remember he hasn't won one of those here since the second round):

- Get your first serve in, often check

- Play aggressive, but don't take unnecessary risks, check

- Use your drop shot, check

- Make him work to hold, check

- Win set, to win over the crowd, check

- Remember pickles and chocolate-chip cookie dough ice cream for Mirka (just kidding).

As TMF completed this list, we were left with images of tennis's version of sugar plum fairies, the Roger Federer of yore. Oh, there was a misstep here and there - jawing at umpire Mohammed Lahyani about missing that bad call by a linesman on a ball that basically landed at the foot of Lahyani's's chair at 2.3 mph was one of them. It isn't often that Federer gets booed, but he did then (by a few partisans, anyway).

Then there was that uncomfortable break-point situation at 5-5, resolved when Federer stayed in a quality rally long enough to tease a forehand error out of Monfils and quell the threat. And what was up with being set point down in the tiebreaker, with a second serve to hit against a Frenchman in Paris? A crisp overhead dispatched that menace, after which it was clear sailing. At one point, Federer hit a gorgeous winner, started walking back toward the baseline and, seeming to remember something, he threw in token, half-hearted fist pump.

It was like he was thinking: I don't need to do this crap anymore, but what the hail, for old time's sake. . .

Given Federer's multiple skills, and the depth of his tool box, it's sometimes easy to forget the extent to which, like any mortal tennis player, he tends to make his own life much easier when he's got a good serving groove going. That was never more obvious than it was today, and it seemed to me the key factor in the match. Although his 57 per cent conversion rate for the match (Monfils was one percentage point higher) may leap out at you, Federer's overall serving efficiency was praiseworthy. You know that the man is letting it rip when he ends up with his knees practically touching his abs as he follows through and launches forward.

The critical error Monfils made - and it was one that underscored that this was, after all, only his second Grand Slam quarterfinal - was losing his taste for the war after Federer won the first big battle. It was a pity, because Monfils handled the situation beautifully. He played a fine first set; whatever emotions he felt never distracted him his realistic game plan or his efficient, maturely calibrated stroking combinations. He played at a very high level, and if he failed to sustain it, the reason is more likely to have been inexperience than the inability to keep up that standard.

Monfils' confidence and focus wilted under the afternoon Parisian sun in the second set, and so did the crowd's willingness to offer their hearts and lungs to the distracted young warrior. But as this was Federer 2.0 again, many of them gladly hopped the razor-wire and bolted for the camp of the enemy. It was as if they were thinking, Hey, how many more times are we going to get the chance to be part of something that, if it comes to pass, would be as historic as a Federer win at Roland Garros?

Monfils played his way out of the match in the second set, and by the time he lifted his spirits and got into the chest-pounding, yelling, fist-pumping territory, it was too late. He wasn't going to fool Federer, he wasn't going to fool the crowd, and he wasn't going to fool himself. It was over.

Read the Federer presser - it contains some real gems, and his tone and overall attitude suggests that Federer's most perilous moments here might be behind him. Here's a question I posed in the presser:

The game and even the attitude you showed in that first set, some of us think we haven't seen that from you in recent times. Did you feel that way too? Did you feel you're back on a track that hasn't been running as straight as it has in the past?

He replied, "Well, I thought I played great in Madrid, you know. I was mixing up my game really well. I think these last four matches have been rather on the difficult side, just because I had some tough starts to the matches. Instead of maybe going ahead a break I was down a break or down a set. You know, being down a set is never really a comforting feeling. That's why for me it was important to get off to a better start today, and thank god I got the first set. For the first time I could play a bit more relaxed match. I think I showed it today. I was able to hit through the ball more. Everything just started to click. That's something I haven't had a whole lot at this tournament yet."

I wrote after the Haas match that there appears to be a fated quality to Federer's drive at Roland Garros this year, and his proudest fans ought to be happy to hear that he feels it, too. Of course, he may not want to go there - not in his own conscious mind, and certainly not in public even if he did entertain the thought. But read this riff, which he went on in response to a question about feeling the support of the crowd here:

"Yeah, I mean, I feel it since a few years now, to be honest with you. But this year even more extreme. When I walk on the streets or drive in the transportation or I go for dinner, everybody is like, This is your year. You've got to do it. They're screaming from their scooters and out of the car. They even get out at the red lights and want me to sign an autograph or take a picture. It's quite incredible these last couple of weeks."




As much as I love torturing Federer fans and could leave you with nightmares about jinxing your man by predicting that there's no way he loses this title, I'll leave it at that.

I mean, how can anyone not hope that Federer wins this one?
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Old 06-04-2009, 03:30 PM   #244
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thanks!
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Old 06-04-2009, 05:46 PM   #245
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Link: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/ten...im-Henman.html


French Open 2009: Roger Federer deserves to make history, says Tim Henman

Tim Henman doesn't really 'do' angry, but ask him if Roger Federer, the French Open favourite, is on the slide and he positively bristles.

Federer, who faces Juan Martin Del Potro in the semi-finals at Roland Garros, is two wins away from tennis history. A 14th grand slam title would equal Pete Sampras' record and give Federer a prestigious clean sweep of all four majors.

It would also make predictions about Federer's demise seem significantly premature.

"People don't appreciate how good Federer is," Henman told Telegraph Sport. "They say 'oh, that was a good shot', and you think no, hang on, that was an unbelievable shot. He just made it look easy.

"Federer won three majors in a year three times. No one has ever done that. There's two ways to go from there. You either win the grand slam or you come down a bit, and realistically you can only drop from that level.

"But the guy is 27. He's hardly over the hill. He's made 19 consecutive grand slam semis. I think the best before that was nine or something. It's a joke how good he's been. He's the best player I've ever seen, or played against. I'm not a massive fan of comparisons through the generations, but if you asked me to pick one I'd say he's the best player ever."

Many pundits cited this year's defeat against Rafael Nadal in the Australian Open final - which left Federer in floods of tears - as the moment power shifted in men's tennis. But Henman reads nothing into such a raw display of emotion.

"Roger's a really good friend of mine, and he's so laid back and down to earth," said Henman.

"I beat Federer in the final at Basle [Federer's home town] three or four years ago and he was crying his eyes out. When he won Wimbledon in 2003 he was bawling his eyes out. He's just a really emotional guy. He's honest enough to say 'this is who I am'."
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Old 06-04-2009, 06:57 PM   #246
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Tim nice words from him.
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Old 06-04-2009, 08:03 PM   #247
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I always appreciate the words from former players because they see things in a way that most tennis writers don't
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Old 06-04-2009, 08:04 PM   #248
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Quote:
As much as I love torturing Federer fans and could leave you with nightmares about jinxing your man by predicting that there's no way he loses this title, I'll leave it at that.

I mean, how can anyone not hope that Federer wins this one?


Quote:
Originally Posted by trickcy View Post
Link: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/sport/ten...im-Henman.html


French Open 2009: Roger Federer deserves to make history, says Tim Henman

Tim Henman doesn't really 'do' angry, but ask him if Roger Federer, the French Open favourite, is on the slide and he positively bristles.

Federer, who faces Juan Martin Del Potro in the semi-finals at Roland Garros, is two wins away from tennis history. A 14th grand slam title would equal Pete Sampras' record and give Federer a prestigious clean sweep of all four majors.

It would also make predictions about Federer's demise seem significantly premature.

"People don't appreciate how good Federer is," Henman told Telegraph Sport. "They say 'oh, that was a good shot', and you think no, hang on, that was an unbelievable shot. He just made it look easy.

"Federer won three majors in a year three times. No one has ever done that. There's two ways to go from there. You either win the grand slam or you come down a bit, and realistically you can only drop from that level.

"But the guy is 27. He's hardly over the hill. He's made 19 consecutive grand slam semis. I think the best before that was nine or something. It's a joke how good he's been. He's the best player I've ever seen, or played against. I'm not a massive fan of comparisons through the generations, but if you asked me to pick one I'd say he's the best player ever."

Many pundits cited this year's defeat against Rafael Nadal in the Australian Open final - which left Federer in floods of tears - as the moment power shifted in men's tennis. But Henman reads nothing into such a raw display of emotion.

"Roger's a really good friend of mine, and he's so laid back and down to earth," said Henman.

"I beat Federer in the final at Basle [Federer's home town] three or four years ago and he was crying his eyes out. When he won Wimbledon in 2003 he was bawling his eyes out. He's just a really emotional guy. He's honest enough to say 'this is who I am'."


Why is it so hard for others to understand this?
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Old 06-04-2009, 08:15 PM   #249
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Quote:
Originally Posted by recessional View Post
Why is it so hard for others to understand this?
Perhaps because they simply don't want to?
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Old 06-04-2009, 10:19 PM   #250
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Three or four years ago? LOL, Tim's delusional. Try eight.
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Old 06-05-2009, 04:51 PM   #251
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R. FEDERER/G. Monfils

7-6, 6-2, 6-4

An interview with:

ROGERFEDERER

THE MODERATOR: Questions in English, please.

Q. Simple question: How did you feel?

ROGER FEDERER: Sure, I was very happy to be back in thesemis here, and having played a good match against Gael. I think it's been my most consistent match ofthe tournament so far, and of course it comes at the right time because I knewthe danger of Gael.

Q. What was your impression of his game? Do you think he suffered a bit from the home crowd? Depression?

ROGER FEDERER: We're all nervous at this stage of thecompetition. I felt it. Yesterday I felt it, and I felt it againtoday in the warmup, when I warmed up before the match. I was tired, I was nervous, and I didn't feelreally good.

Then once out on court,you know, I get my act together with the experience. You know, I think things will be allright. Sure, maybe he's put too muchpressure on him. I doubt it, you know,because it's part of our job and we're used to it.

He definitely didn't play the best ofmatches in the second, but I think the first set was very high quality, and sowas the third. So I still think heplayed a pretty good match.

Q. Howwas the crowd for you? I had theimpression the French crowd is almost behind you.

ROGER FEDERER: I think it was fair, you know. Of course, I'm delighted to see to whatextent they are supporting me. You know,I feel like they've almost adopted me, you know. I obviously, you know, thanked them for that,and I'll try to come up with some other good performances hopefully.

Q. Against Del Potro in the semis.

ROGER FEDERER: That's great. You are watching the matches. Yeah, it's a good matchup. I'vehad some success against him, especially in Australia. I played a great match.

That's not the kind ofmatch I'm looking at. I'm looking moreof in Madridit was a closer match. I think claysuits his game even more, and he's really improved a lot in the last year orso. I'm sure it's going to be adifficult match.

Q. It looks as if Gael Monfils had some very warm words for you at the end of the match. Do you get the sense a lot of people are pulling for you this week, that they'd love to see you finally doit on Sunday?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, I feel it since a few yearsnow, to be honest with you. But thisyear even more extreme. When I walk onthe streets or drive in the transportation or I go for dinner, everybody islike, This is your year. You've got todo it.

They're screaming fromtheir scooters and out of the car. Theyeven get out at the red lights and want me to sign an autograph or take apicture. It's quite incredible this lastcouple of weeks.

It just shows me that everybody is watchingthe French Open here, and it's great to get the support. You know, once out inthe stadium it's amazing. I mean, wedon't have a grand Slam in Switzerland,but I definitely feel at home in the Grand Slams, and especially here.

Q. How do you deal with that yourself knowing thatyou're only two matches away from finally realizing your dream? It must be exciting, and clearly every nowand again you have to let yourself think about that.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I mean, it's also one of the reasonswhy I was nervous going into this match, because, you know, the whole storiesof, you know, Nadal losing, Murray losing, Djokovic losing, maybe opening upthe draw a little bit.

Obviously they alsoplay with my mind, even though it doesn't affect me yet. Now it does because I'm not playing Djokovicbut I'm playing Del Potro. But even thatwould have been an okay draw as well playing Novak. I've also had some good success against him.

It's nice feeling the support. You know, it can only help a player, to behonest. I'm very thrilled and excited tobe back in another semis and giving myself the opportunity. Doesn't mean because I have a great recordagainst all the players left in the draw that, you know, I'm going to win this,but I'll definitely try everything I possibly can to do it.

Q. Thegame and even the attitude you showed in that first set, some of us think wehaven't seen that from you in recent times. Did you feel that way too? Didyou feel you're back on a track that hasn't been running as straight as it hasin the past?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I thought I played great in Madrid, you know. I was mixing up my game really well. I think this last four matches I think havebeen rather on the difficult side, just because I had some tough starts to thematches. Instead of maybe going ahead abreak I was down a break or down a set.

You know, being down a set is never really a comforting feeling. That's why for me it was important to get off to a better start today,and thank god I got the first set. Forthe first time I could play a bit more relaxed match.

I think I showed it today. I was able to hit through the ball more. Everything just started to click. That's something I haven't had a whole lot atthis tournament yet.

Q. Whenyou talk about the nervousness you felt, tension and stuff right before thematch, was that something that maybe you needed actually to be able to respondthe way you did?

ROGER FEDERER: I mean, I don't like it, but I know that onceon center court for the match I'll be okay. That's where I think experience helps me in a big way. If I would have never been in a quarterfinal***efore, I think I would have maybe crumbled under the pressure or played awrong game plan or mentally been fragile.

But knowing I've beenin this position so many times, and it doesn't matter if I'm zero nervous or100% nervous, I know I'll always play a decent match in the quarterfinals stageof a Grand Slam.

Q. That's 20 Grand Slam semis in a row for you now, but you talk aboutbeing nervous. Are the nerves muchgreater this time, because this is the one you so desperately want to win?

ROGER FEDERER: That's what you guys say. No, I mean, I get nervous from time to time,you know, on some matches. There's no reasonbehind it, you know. But when you maybesometimes want to do maybe too well, that happens. Or just because you know it could be a toughcrowd or maybe you're not 100%, you know, sure about your game yet.

That's how I feltbefore this match, for instance, you know. But I could go into the semifinal match feeling zero nerves, youknow. That's not always a good sign,either. For me, it's good to be able togo through those moments where I still do feel nervous. That means I care for the game and I want tostay around for a long time.

Q. Earlier in the year when you weren't playing your best, kind of pointout what you think was preventing you from doing that? And were you positive that your best stuffwas just around the corner?

ROGER FEDERER: I mean, I thought I played great in Australia. For some reason, just because I lost in five,people think I played terrible at the Australian Open. It's not the case. I played great in Australia and ran into Rafa whoplayed phenomenal tennis. UnfortunatelyI didn't play a great fifth set, but he took advantage and got it.

After that, I agree that many times I had the match on my racquet, like against Murrayin Indian Wells, Djokovic in Miami, and so forth, and also in Rome.

But I didn't play that many tournaments yet,let's not forget. I had a back problem Ihad to deal with. You know, I just hadto get back into the tournament swing.

That's why I was actually prettyhappy the way I've always been playing. I think it would have been different if I would have lost first andsecond round all the time, but it wasn't the case. I always played semis or finals, basically.

For this reason, I always knew therewas no need to panic. It was justimportant to keep on working extremely hard and do the right things, and I'mhappy that the hard work is paying off, you know, more and more.

But still I have some more work todo, you know, to stay where I am rightnow and hopefully get the French Open title and then hopefully move on to thegrass in a great spirit.

Q. Yousaid that people were screaming at you at red lights and getting off theirscooters. Have you ever had this kind ofemotional, sort of raw emotional support? And secondly, do you think that's a little bit dangerous?

ROGER FEDERER: Not really. I enjoy it, to be honest. They'reall very happy to see me, you know. Ifelt this way now for a couple of years now, and in New York as well where I gotunbelievable, tremendous support. Ithink they really wanted to see me do well, you know, after maybe sort of arocky season last year.

I think they reallywanted me to win the US Open. I felt ita little bit in New York,to be honest.

Q. Your next match will be against Juan Martin Del Potro in semifinal. Could you please tell me something about thismatch, your feeling about this match, about Del Potro?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I think he's improved in incredibleways since, let's say one year ago. Ithink he was only ranked 50 in the world this time last year. Just shows how quickly things can change intennis.

With a lot ofconfidence and a good game plan and good physique and good mental, you can govery far in tennis. But it takes a lotof hard work, and I think that's what he has put into. You know, at his young age to already achieveregular quarterfinals and semifinals of Slams is a great effort.

I expect a very difficult match against JuanMartin. I have a lot of respect forhim. Yeah, I have a good record againsthim, but it doesn't mean a thing right now because it's too big of a match, toodangerous, and he's playing too well at this tournament to underestimate him.

THE MODERATOR: French questions, please.

Q. You were very consistent in your game right from the first rally, so howdid you prepare for this match mentally to be in the match at all times?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I hoped I would start better thanduring the last matches when I put myself in difficult situation either becauseof my opponent or because of my game. But quite fortunately today the tiebreak was good. I played in a very aggressive way.

I managed to go by thetactic I had planned. When I can dothat, I feel very confident, and I felt confident. And then my shape was getting better andbetter all along the match. I'm veryhappy with my performance today.

Q. Was experience important today?

ROGER FEDERER: Maybe. I didn't talk about the match with Gael afterwards. I didn't listen to what he said. But as far as I'm concerned, whether I'm nervous or not before such a match, I know that these are key moments, and these are the key moments when I play the best.

I have new opportunityto reach the semifinals here in Paris,and I can do better.

Q. You said it at least 10 times today that you were nervous. Were you nervous because he was a French guy,because people said it was the most difficult match for you on your way to thetitle? Was it "the" opponentyou had to defeat to win the title?

ROGER FEDERER: No, those guys reaching semifinals deservemore than those who are not. Maybe it'sa combination of everything, but it can also be a feeling you have, you know,deep within yourself.

You think, okay, I'mnervous. I don't know why. You can't sleep well, even though before itwasn't a problem. But you don't manageto eat well, you feel a bit dizzy, and you don't know exactly why. You know, there are days like that on thetour. That happens.

It's also true that there's a lot ofpressure with all those who lost before, and I was facing a French guy. So quite normal I had a bit of pressure, butthat made no difference once I was on the court.

Q. Whendid you understand that you actually won the match? Was it during the second set or during thethird set when you had this forehand down the line?

ROGER FEDERER: No, that was when I had a break game at 5-4. I knew I was in an optimal position, andyet you always have a huge respect for your opponent. You can't help but thinking, well, with hisstyle, with the support of the crowd, he can still win the third set, and thenwe'll have to play a fourth set and it's going to be hard.

So it's 5-4, 30-Love,and you feel a bit more relaxed than if you have to play a tiebreak.

Q. In English you said it was your best match here in Paris. Maybe your best match on clay this year. Why would you say that? What inyour game are you particularly happy about today?

ROGER FEDERER: A bit of everything. I managed to implement my tactics. I wanted to be aggressive, and I managed tobe aggressive, even if I made mistakes at the beginning. But I went by my plan and it worked out, soI'm happy.

I had good coverage ofthe courts. I'm happy. I know that Gael is the kind of player, youknow, when he wants, he can play incredible tennis. When he doesn't, he doesn't.

He has these ups and downs, so that makes itdifficult to play him. But today itworked out well, so I'm extremely happy about it.

Q. Youmight be playing a final against a Swedish guy. What can you tell us about Soderling's game?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, wonderful. He's defeated Ferrer, Nadal, and Davydenko,one after the other, not even playing five sets. I think it was four sets, four sets, andthree sets. I just played him in Madrid. It was an easy match, two sets. But he's in pretty good shape, so he's gotlots of chances in semifinals.

Q. A week ago, would you have imagined you'd be the super favorite of thetournament? If we told you that like 10days ago, would you have believed us?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, at this stage, you know, I expected Iwould be in semifinals, but I was not expecting Rafa to be out before thesemifinals.

But once you've reachedthe semifinals, those four guys have an opportunity to win the tournament.

Q. That's a huge performance. That'syour 20th semifinal in a Grand Slam tournament. That sounds crazy. What do youthink about it?

ROGER FEDERER: It's the "in a row" that seemsincredible to me. Twenty semifinals isincredible, but twenty semifinals in a row? It's even more incredible, even to me. Sometimes I lose sight of it because of all the tournaments and matchesI play all along the year. You losesights of these records, but that's probably the one I'm most proud of.

I still hold it. So, yes, that's big. That's huge. I'm really proud of it.
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Default Re: Roger news and articles

Fabulous Federer stands firm to make final
Friday, June 5, 2009
By David Tutton


Roger Federer edged closer to tennis immortality on Friday after standing firm in the face of a Juan Martin Del Potro onslaught to win in five gruelling sets 3-6 7-6(2) 2-6 6-1 6-4. In one of the all-time great French Open semi-finals, the second seed drew on all his experience, class and courage to grind down an adversary who looked in control and on course for victory for long periods, before tiring noticeably.

The Swiss great now knows he is one match from making history. Should he beat Robin Soderling in Sunday’s final, Federer will become only the sixth man in history to win all four Grand Slam titles. He will also equal Pete Sampras' all-time record of 14 Grand Slam titles.

Playing his 200th Grand Slam match and, incredibly, 20th consecutive Grand Slam semi-final, the Swiss was made to fight all the way by fifth seed Del Potro. Playing in his first-ever Grand Slam semi, the Argentinean steamrolled his illustrious elder for two of the first three sets but proved unable to sustain his barrage of booming serves and pummelling ground strokes as the match drew into a fourth hour.

Federer in contrast upped his game at just the right time, drawing level at one set all when under pressure and then making the most of the Argentinean’s dip in form in the fourth to drive his advantage home. The fifth set was all about who could deal with the fatigue and the pressure, and at that game Federer is a past master. A brilliant inside-out forehand sealed the match after 3 hours 29 minutes to send Federer and his admiring fans into raptures.

Early dominance

The match was an epic, and like all epics could have gone either way. Del Potro began as he meant to go on, crashing down aces from a great height (16 in all to Roger’s 5) and thrashing winners all over the court (55 to Federer’s 50). The force of his groundstrokes was a sight to behold, and try as he might Federer was unable to prevent a break, first in the fifth game and then again in the ninth. The opener was wrapped up 6-3 in 38 minutes.

Things were looking ominous for the Swiss, but he is not one of the all-time greats for nothing. If he could not find a way past the Argentinean’s booming serve, he would hang in there and wait either for an opportunity to arise or for his opponent to miss. The latter finally occurred in a high pressure second set tiebreak, when Del Potro netted twice and hit long to hand him the set 7-6(2).

That proved to be crucial, because the 20 year old was right back on hard-hitting form in the third set, which he took 6-2 in 36 minutes, breaking Federer twice in the process. As in the first set, there was little the former world number one could do about it.

Turning tide

Then, at last, Del Potro showed signs of weakening. His hitherto impeccable first serve began to malfunction and his groundstrokes to misfire. As a result, Federer gained his first break points since the opening set in the first game of the fourth set, failed to capitalise, but made no mistake in the fourth game and again in the sixth to seize the set 6-1 in 38 minutes.

Federer now had the bit between his teeth. He began running around his backhand to fire crosscourt winners and upped his first serve percentage to keep his opponent under pressure. He also used the drop shot to great effect as the conditions became heavier.

It was no surprise when the Swiss broke Del Potro in the opening game of the fifth set and then led 3-1. But just when we were all thinking it was all but over, Del Potro fought back, finding the corners again to level at 3-3. That proved to be a last hurrah for the brave youngster. Federer broke back immediately to lead 4-3 and served out for the set at 5-4.

One match away

Federer has now equalled Ivan Lendl’s all-time record of 19 Grand Slam finals and is set to appear in his fourth consecutive Roland Garros final on Sunday. With Rafael Nadal, his nemesis of the past three years, safely out of the tournament, and only the unheralded Swede Robin Soderling standing between him and his Holy Grail, Federer will be feeling confident he is nearly there.

But he also knows that Soderling has been playing awesome tennis all fortnight, and that nothing, least of all immortality, should be taken for granted…

-------------------------

source: from the Roland Garros site
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Default Re: Roger news and articles

R. FEDERER/J. Del Potro

3‑6, 7‑6, 2‑6, 6‑1, 6‑4

An interview with:

ROGERFEDERER

THE MODERATOR: Questions in English, please.

Q. How tense was it?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, it was a tough match, no doubt. I thought he came out of the blocks reallystrong with his serve and the way he was setting up his shots, especially withhis forehand, which can, you know, miss sometimes.

It wasn't the casetoday, so it was quite a bit of pressure. I also thought he had the upper hand from the baseline. He was serving better, so he obviouslydeserved the lead.

It was important for me to stay with himthrough the second set and save myself into the breaker, because I wasn'tgetting many break opportunities. Thankgod my serve started to get better as the match went on.

I think once I got that second set,you know, I knew I was always going to be in a shot. The longer the match went, I was alwaysconfident with my, you know, with my physical abilities and my mental abilitiesthat I was going to be able to turn it around in a tough situation.

So I'm very happy to have made it,once again.

Q. Twothings: In years past you've kind ofdisdained the dropshot. Today it playedvery well for you. You maybe hit 20, 25winners off that side. In the final twosets, it seemed in the more athletic, physical points that it played in yourfavorite, also.

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I thought the conditions definitelyslowed down midway through the fourth set or so when the clouds came in, thecooler weather came in.

I also think that mighthave helped me, you know, as well as getting more into his service games andinto his rallies. I knew if I were ableto break him that things could definitely fall my way, and that's exactly whathappened.

I think I definitely started to play a bitbetter. I was able to play moreconsistent and also mix it up well. Thenalways, again, use the dropshot. It'sdefinitely been an important shot for me this tournament so far.

Q. Youhad a huge match in the second round against Acasuso and another one againstHaas and another one today. Is it evengreater satisfaction for you to be in the French final this time given thehardships you've had to endure along the way?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, absolutely. It feels great coming through tough matcheslike this, you know. It's moreemotional. It's more satisfaction, eventhough I'm ‑‑ I love matches when I can really dominate an opponent.

But this is also agreat feeling of coming through this way, you know, not the easy way, showingdifferent qualities. It's not alwayssomething I've actually had a chance to show, because matches were over tooquickly sometimes. It's good for me, somy career hopefully is going to be longer because of those matches, in the longrun.

I still feel fine, you know. Going to rest up tomorrow, practice a littlebit, and get ready for the tough final.

Q. Thefact is, picking up on that, almost all your matches, apart from Monfils, youhave played better and better the longer the match has gone on. Is that experience? Is that finding it more difficult to get intoa rhythm early? It's happened about fivetimes now.

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah. Look, I don't know. I think I'vedefinitely had a tough draw. Lookingback, I've played against quality players who play well on clay. It's maybe their best surface. They always got out of the blocks prettygood, you know, which made it hard for me.

Against Monfils it wasobviously key to win that first set, so it was again today. It's in every match the same thing, but it'simportant that, you know, I canreact now. There was a time when I waslosing quite a bit of three‑set matches. You know, obviously they're not physical or anything, but for somereason I wasn't able to come back in those.

Here we are in the best‑of‑five setscenario. Maybe I'm just more relaxedknowing that, you know, as time goes by I'm only going to get stronger, and thehard work is paying off.

It's nice, because I practice forhours and hours and hours and I don't get tired, you know. So then to be able to show it also on a matchcourt in a big opportunity like this, it's fantastic.

Q. Yourlast hit make you win the match and you go to the final on Sunday. Your last hit hit my camera really hardly.

ROGER FEDERER: I hit what?

Q. My camera. I was taking photo ofyou. I was in the hole behind thebaseline.

ROGER FEDERER: I hope you're okay (laughter.) Risky job.

Q. On Sunday you will play with Soderling, so your opponent is not RafaNadal anymore. What do you feel aboutthe match on Sunday? Will that be mucheasier for you, or what do you think?

ROGER FEDERER: Um, look, there's no easy Grand Slamfinals. It's very simple, because theone who is on the other side of the net has also won six matches and isdefinitely in the shape of his life.

I cannot obviouslyunderestimate Robin, even though I've beaten him I think in the five matcheswe've played against each other. Butobviously it's nice to see someone else for a change in the French Openfinals. I've been there before. I don't know if it's an advantage or not,because I've never been able to win.

I'm sure, you know, pressure is big for bothplayers, you know. Not only for me, butalso for him. It's his first big step ina Grand Slam. I'm sure we're going toplay some good tennis, because I thought he played we will really well todayagainst González.

Q. Howdangerous is Soderling? In what way ishe dangerous for you?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean, he was pretty famous for beingdangerous on indoor court, you know, just because he had a big serve. He has big shots off both sides, forehand andbackhand. I always knew also he hadcapabilities on clay, you know.

But maybe because hewas so dangerous on indoors you never really give him maybe the respect on aslower courts. But he's beaten suchquality players here during his last couple of weeks that you've got to givehim credit for coming through those. They were not easy matches, especially mentally for him, and alsophysically.

The way he came through today was impressiveafter being down a set and being able to just to turn around like this. He is definitely ‑‑ he's playing the tennisof his life. I'm sure it's going to be ahard final, but I'm ready for the challenge.

Q. Youtalked to us in Romebefore that tournament started about the physical work that you've beendoing. You're a little bit secretive,but you said you had been doing a little bit of physical work. Could you just perhaps give us an impressionof what you were doing there and how important that has been in this clay courtrun?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I mean I've always been workinghard. It's not like it's the first timein my life I've started to work hard. People sometimes overreact. Butat the same time, it's also I think important to let the people know what youare actually doing, you know, when you're not at a tournament, you know.

I work extremely hardwhen I'm away from the tournaments. WhenI'm at the tournament I pace myself, because most importantly is that I'mrested in those events. That's you whenyou se me warmup. I'm more laid backbecause I've already put in the hard work once I get there.

It was a lot of getting used to the sliding,the longer rallies, the four‑hours‑in‑a‑row practice sessions. Those kind of things. Just getting ‑‑ serving for a long time,running around for a long time and just making it really a match situation in afive setter of a French Open.

That's what I'm trying to do, andit's nice obviously that's been able to pay off. It's been a good clay court preparation I'vehad, and I thought I should play well in Romealready. Unfortunately I didn't beatDjokovic in the semis, which I think I should have.

But ever since, I haven't beenlooking back at the defeats. Also I'mvery confident right now.

Q. Whenyou get into a five setter against Del Potro who has been firing the ball well,very promising, doesn't have the experience, do you go out in the fifth say,Show me what you got; I've been here; let me see what you have?

ROGER FEDERER: Yeah, I definitely feel more confidentagainst a younger player. I rememberwhen I was younger going to a fifth set is always a bit uneasy, you know, justbecause you haven't been there that much. You're hoping so much to play well, and I think in a fifth set there'snot, how you say ‑‑ you can't just start hitting crazy shots. There is much more mental and physical thingsthat come into a match like this.

Obviously at this age Ido feel better going into a fifth set than I did before.

Q. You have a good relationship with Laver. I wonder in you've talked to him lately before the tournament?

ROGER FEDERER: Rod Laver?

Q. Yeah.

ROGER FEDERER: Don't have his phone number. I didn't see him here, but, I mean, we getalong well when we see each other. It isso rare, and it's usually once a year. Ijust guess it's common sense that, you know, when you've been at the top of thegame, for him and for me, that you relate and you like each other.

I'm very respectfultowards the older generation, you know, everything that they were able toachieve. You know, when people reach astatus like he did, you know, who get massive stadiums named after him and therespect that he gets from his other players. You only hear good things about him. A legend like he is, it's understood that I have the biggest respect forhim.

Q. He admires you greatly. I talkedto him the other day.

ROGER FEDERER: That's nice. Well, you have a connection. That's nice. I wish I had it.

THE MODERATOR: French questions, please.

Q. Isit one of the most moving and difficult semis that you've ever played?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, yes. I can't remember a five‑set match that I've played that was somoving. Well, maybe. I've played several five‑set matches. You know, Safin was one of those, but thisone I won. So it's important to me tostay calm, yet it's all about emotions that tend to overwhelm you.

It's this feeling, thisincredible feeling to win this match. You know, I was down one set and then down two sets to one. It's incredible to get into the match andthen end this way.

Even though I was sad for him, because, youknow, he's a young player. You alwaysthink that there aren't that many opportunities, that many chances for youngerplayers, you know. So I was a bit sadfor him when I won.

I respect him awfully because hemade considerable progress, and I'm certain he's going to be a great player inthe future.

Q. Whatabout the support of the French crowd? Do you feel something special this year? I have the impression that everybody is for you.

ROGER FEDERER: Yes, of course. They were really great with me, and theyprobably waited for this moment. They wantedme to do something magical. It took me acertain while before I did it. It wasprobably due to Del Potro's game. It wasan incredible match, I can tell you.

I had to wait longbefore I could do this, because when I needed the support of the French crowdthey were here with me supporting me. AsI said before, the crowd was very emotional.

Q. Several days ago you talked about 2006 and 2007 when you were totallycontrolling the game. You weredominating the game. This time I had theimpression it's a fight for you. Haveyou learned something from this match?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, yes. As I said in 2006 or 2007 when I had to play five‑set matches I said, Ican't remember when the last or latest five‑set match was. You know, when you go from practicing tomatches, it's difficult to know where you stand.

I always knew I wouldbe strong physically and mentally, as well. But, you know, it's a test. Afive‑set match is a test. When there aretough moments, quarterfinals, semifinals, finals, when it's a five‑set match,that's when you can find the answers you need to find.

So I've never really tried to play a five‑setmatch on purpose to know where I would stand. But today with experience, I'm older, I've got more information, I knowwhat I can do physically and mentally. So it's simpler for me today than in the past, even though of course itis a fight.

I like it, because there weremoments when I thought it was quite easy.

Q. Now,you've said you know where you stand today. So is this more reassuring?

ROGER FEDERER: Yes, of course. You know, to end a match or rather to endthis, you know ‑‑ when you are playing a Grand Slam match, what happenedbefore no longer counts. It's thefeelings that count.

When you reach thefinal, all questions have been answered. You know where you stand. Thereare no pending issues. I know thatphysically I have zero problems on Sunday, and this is what counts. This is what's going to reassure me I feelgood.

Q. Soderling is totally fit here today in Roland Garros. Is that something that would worry you herefor the finals? Soderling is reallytraining and practicing. He's fit. Is this something that's bothers you?

ROGER FEDERER: No, I totally respect what he's done sofar. What he's done is that he's playedgreat matches. I watched some of those,you know, the big matches he played. Well, of course, it is a surprise.

You know, it's not justa quick win and then you reach the finals in a Grand Slam. It's an incredible tournament he's had sofar.

But it's still open for both of us. It's not ended yet. So I'm really happy for him, because he'smanaged to come through, to stand out. SoI hope I'm going to stop him now.

Q. Now,today you've played against a very big server, and what about this? What about the break points?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, I had two break points at the beginningof the match. I thought that's a goodstart, and then no more break points during two sets. Usually it happens on grass or hardcourts,but on clay this was a bit frustrating.

So that's true. I've gone through difficult moments today,but I had to remain calm because I knew the public was waiting for aturnaround, a moment for me. But Icouldn't do it, because as I said before, you know, Juan Martin was playingreally well.

Q. It was 3‑All in the fifth set, and then he didn't serve very well. He couldn't serve his first balls. Do you think that physically something wentwrong with him, or mentally?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, this might happen, you see. You can't practice on this. Well, of course it is surprising. I think he couldn't play eight first servesduring this game. Well, maybe I couldhave broken. It wouldn't have been eightpoints but four points.

But anyway, it issurprising; that's true. But this mighthappen. The conditions were slower. Perhaps he felt pressure. Perhaps he was tired. These things happen. I don't think he should worry about this.

Q. Will you not miss Rafa Nadal on Sunday?

ROGER FEDERER: No, not really. Not really. Maybe for you you're going to miss him, but not me.

Q. Well, this was like a meeting, a special appointment. It had been the case for three years.

ROGER FEDERER: Four years. Four years.

But I've played againsthim 20 times, so it's always nice to play against somebody else. You know, I'll still play against Nadalseveral times in the future, so that's okay. I'm happy to play against someone else.

Q. You've said that Sunday's match is going to be very open, but could wesay that you are the favorite for the finals?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, it's up to you. Well, yes, it's up to you. I've never lost ‑‑ I was never defeatedby him, and I was there during other Roland Garros finals but I never won.

Well, yes, of course Ithink that clearly I'm the favorite, but this doesn't mean much. You know, such a final with pressure on bothsides, you see. He doesn't know what aGrand Slam final is, but I know, and I've played so many times that this couldbe good for us.

But also, you see, he's got nothing tolose. This is a very open match.

Q. Duringthe tournament, there were very tough moments. You've played against Monfils, against others. Do you have the impression that this year isyour year? There are signs outthere. Don't you think so?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, ask me the same question again Sundayevening, because for the time being ‑‑ well, yes, it's okay for me. I've gone through very hard moments duringthe tournament. I've overcome them, yetthere is a leap forward to consider.

I was very happy toplay all these matches on the central court this year. This is something which is not really usualor normal. But, you know, it's also dueto the opponents I was playing against. I was playing on central court. So this is good for me, because I could practice. I was prepared for each match.

I knew that this was the central court I wasplaying on. This is something I liked, Ienjoyed, and I hope I'll play a good match on Sunday. But as I said before, please ask me the samequestion Sunday evening.

Q. Sundayyou can go down in the books if you win the only title that you've not yet wonfor a Grand Slam. You can go down in therecord books. What do you feel aboutthis? Is it fear? Is it that you're excited?

ROGER FEDERER: Well, not fear. Excited, yes, of course I'm excited, becauseI know that these moments will not happen every single day. Yet I'm quite relaxed. I've played so many finals, you see, GrandSlam finals, major tournaments, major finals. I've seen that several times already, so I'm not going to get tooexcited over this.

You know, I'm not goingto say, Okay, if I don't win this year I'm never going to win. You know, I've always done my best here atRoland Garros. I have all my chances inthe future, as well. So what I'll tryand do is focus on the match. I'll do mybest, play my best tennis on clay, and I hope that I can win the cup.
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Old 06-06-2009, 06:07 AM   #254
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Default Re: Roger news and articles

Thanks a lot for posting the interview, Mrs.B
I think it's a pretty good one
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mrs. B View Post

Q. Yourlast hit make you win the match and you go to the final on Sunday. Your last hit hit my camera really hardly.

ROGER FEDERER: I hit what?

Q. My camera. I was taking photo ofyou. I was in the hole behind thebaseline.

ROGER FEDERER: I hope you're okay (laughter.) Risky job.


Quote:
ROGER FEDERER: Don't have his phone number. I didn't see him here, but, I mean, we getalong well when we see each other. It isso rare, and it's usually once a year. Ijust guess it's common sense that, you know, when you've been at the top of thegame, for him and for me, that you relate and you like each other.

I'm very respectfultowards the older generation, you know, everything that they were able toachieve. You know, when people reach astatus like he did, you know, who get massive stadiums named after him and therespect that he gets from his other players. You only hear good things about him. A legend like he is, it's understood that I have the biggest respect forhim.

Q. He admires you greatly. I talkedto him the other day.

ROGER FEDERER: That's nice. Well, you have a connection. That's nice. I wish I had it.
I always like hearing him speak about the former players.

Quote:
Q. Will you not miss Rafa Nadal on Sunday?

ROGER FEDERER: No, not really. Not really. Maybe for you you're going to miss him, but not me.

Q. Well, this was like a meeting, a special appointment. It had been the case for three years.

ROGER FEDERER: Four years. Four years.
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Old 06-06-2009, 12:41 PM   #255
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Default Re: Roger news and articles

the bottom Q & A is hilarious. Mikey already has it as his sig.
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